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ANNUAL REPORT 



THE PRESIDENT 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



1906-07. 



PHILADELPHIA : 

THE JOHN C. WINSTON CO. 
1908 






Corporation. 

Board of Trustees. 

Academic Year, 1906-07. 

David Scull,. 

President. 

Henry Tatnall,* Edward Bettle, J 

Treasurer. Secretary. 

Charles Hartshorne. Thomas Scattergool . | 

David Scull. Henry Tatnall.* 

Albert K. Smiley. James Wood. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. Rufus M. Jones. 

Howard Comfort. Alexander C. Wood. 

Justus C. Strawbridge. M. Carey Thomas. 
Francis R. Cope, Jr. 

Board of Directors. 

Academic Year, 1906-07. 

David Scull, 

Chairman. 

Henry Tatnall,* Edward Bettle, Jr., 

Treasurer. Secretary. 

Charles Hartshorne. James Wood. 

David Scull. Rufus M. Jones. 

Albert K. Smiley. Alexander C. Wood. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. M. Carey Thomas. 

Howard Comfort. Francis R. Cope, Jr. 

Justus C. Strawbridge. Annie Crosby Emery Allinson. 

Thomas Scattergood.! Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 

Henry Tatnall.* Mary E. Garrett. 

Executive Committee. 
Howard Comfort. Rufus M. Jones. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. M. Carey Thomas. 

James Wo'od. Francis R. Cope, Jr. 

Annie Crosby Emery Allinson. 

.Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 
Henry Tatnall.* Justus C. Strawbridge. 

Alexander C. Wood. M. Carey Thomas. 

Howard Comfort. Mary E. Garrett. 

Finance Committee. 

Alexander C. Wood. Charles Hartshorne. 

Mary E. Garrett. 

Library Committee. 
Edward Bettle, Jr. Howard Comfort. 

Rufus M. Jones. 

Religious Life Committee. 

Rufus M. Jones. David Scull. 

James Wood. 

* Resigned from Board of Trustees and Board of Directors, May, 1907. Alexander 
C. Wood, appointed Treasurer and Chairman of Committee on Buildings and Grounds, 
t Died April 18, 1907. 



Officers of Administration. 

academic year, 1907-08. 

President, 

M. Caket Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Assistant to the President, 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Dean of the College, 
Marion Reilly, A.B. 
Office: The Library. 

Wardens and Assistant Advisers to the Freshman Class, 
Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Pembroke Hall. 
Alice Anthony, A.B., Denbigh Hall. 
Virginia Tryon Stoddard, A.B., Radnor Hall. 
Elizabeth Farris Stoddard, A.B., Merion Hall. 
Harriet Jean Crawford, A.B., Rockefeller Hall. 
Bertha Margaret Laws, A.B., Pembroke Hall. 

Secretary, 
Anna Bell Lawther, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Recording and Appointment Secretary, 
Ethel McCoy Walker, A.M. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Acting Librarian, 
Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S. Office: The Library. 

Director of Athletics and Gymnastics, 
Constance M. K. Applebee. Office: The Gjonnasium. 

Comptroller, 
James G. Forrester. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Business Manager, 
Alexander H. Campbell. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Junior Bursar, 
Bessie Livingstone. Office: Rockefeller Hall. 

Visiting Physician of the College. 
Ella B. Everitt, M.D. Office hours, daily, 10 to 12, 1807 Spruce Street, 
Philadelphia; Bryn Mawr College Gymnasium, Mondays and Thurs- 
days, 4 to 6. 

Attending Physician of the College. 
Thomas F. Branson, M.D. Office hours, daily, 8 to 9.30 and 2 to 3, 
Rosemont, Penna. 



Academic Appointments 

academic year. 1907-08. 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the College and frofessor 
of English. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1877; studied at the Johns Hopkins University, 1877-78; Uni- 
versity of Leipsic, 1879-82; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1882; Sorbonne and College 
de France, 1883; Dean of the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College and Professor of Eng- 
lish, 1885-94. 

Charlotte Angas Scott, D.Sc, Professor of Mathematics. 

Lincoln, England. Graduate in Honours, Girton College, University of Cambridge, 
England, 1880; B.Sc, University of London, 1882; Lecturer on Mathematics in 
Girton College, 1880-84; lectured in connection with Newnham College, University 
of Cambridge, England, 1880-S3; D.Sc, University of London, 1885. 

George A. Barton, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Literature and Semitic 
Languages 

A.B., Haverford College, 1882, and A.M., 1885; studied under the direction of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Hebrew, 1885-86; Harvard University, 1888-91; Thayer Scholar, 
Harvard University, 1889-91; A.M., Harvard University, 1890; Ph.D.. Harvard 
University, 1891 ; Director of the American School of Oriental Study and Research 
in Palestine, 1902-03. 

Joseph W. Warren, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

A.B., Harvard College, 1871; University of Berlin, 1871-72; University of Leipsic, 1872- 
73; University of Bonn, 1873-79; M.D., University of Bonn, 1880; Assistant and 
Instructor in Physiology, Harvard Medical School, 1881-91; Lecturer in Medical 
Department of the University of the City of New York, 1885-86; Lecturer in Physi- 
ology, University of Michigan, 1889. 

Elmer P. Kohler, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., Muhlenberg College, 1886, and A.M., 1889; Johns Hopkins University, 1889-91; 
Fellow in Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 1891-92; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University. 1892. 

Florence Bascom, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1882, B.Sc, 1884, and A.M., 1887; Johns Hopkins Uni 
versity, 1891-93; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1893; Assistant in Geology and 
Instructor in Petrography, Ohio State University, 1893-95. 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D., Assistant to the President and Associate in 
Mathematics. 

Reading, England. B.Sc, University of London, 1893, Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 
1896, and B.A., Trinity College, Dublin, 1905; Graduate in Honours, First Class, in 
the Cambridge Mathematical Tripos, 1892; Graduate Student in Mathematics, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1892-93, and Fellow in Mathematics, 1893-94; Holder of the Mary 
E. Garrett European Fellowship, and Student in Mathematics, University of Got- 
tingen, 1894-95. 

Wilmer Cave Wright, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Shrewsbury, England. Girton College, University of Cambridge, England, 1888-92 ; 
Classical Tripos, 1892; Fellow in Greek, Brvn Mawr College, 1892-93; Fellow in 
Latin, University of Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in Greek, 1894-95; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1895; Reader in Greek and Latin, University of Chicago, 1895-96. 

James H. Leuba,* Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Education and 
Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. B.S., University of Neuchatel, 1886; Ph.B., Ursinus College, 
1888; Scholar in Psvchology, Clark University, 1892-93; Fellow in Psychology, 
Clark University, 1893-95; Ph.D.. Clark University, 1896. 

* Granted leave of absence for the year 1907-08. 



Fongek DeHaan, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish. 

Leeuwarden, Holland. Ph.D., Johns Hopkina University, 1895; Instructor in Moderu 
Languages, Lehigh University, 1885-91; Fellow in Romance Languages, Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1893-94; Assistant in Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1893-95; Instructor in Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins University, 1895- 
96; Associate in Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins University, 1896-97. 

Albert Schinz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French Literature. 

Neuch&tel, Switzerland. A.B., University of Neuchatel, 1888, and A.M., 1889. Licen- 
tiate in Theology, 1892; Student, University of Berlin, 1892-93; University of Tubin- 
gen, 1893; Ph.D., University of Tubingen, 1894; Sorbonne and College de France, 
1894; Privatdocent, University of Neuchatel, 1896-97; Instructor in French, Clark 
University, 1897-98; Instructor in French, University of Minnesota, 1898-99. 

Arthur Leslie Wheeler, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893; Scholar and Student in Classics, Yale College, 1893-96; 
Ph.D., Yale University, 1896; Instructor and Tutor in Latin, Yale College, 1894- 
1900. 

Lucien Foulet, Professor of French Literature. 

Saint Laurent d'Oingt, Rhone, France. Licencie' fes Lettres, University of Paris, 
1896; Ecole normale superieure and the Sorbonne, 1896-97 :_ University of Cam- 
bridge, England, and University College, London, 1898; Licencie d'Anglais, Univer- 
sity of Paris, 1898; Ecole normale supe'rieure and the Sorbonne, 1899. 

Henry Nevill Sanders, Ph.D., Professor of Greek. 

Edinburgh, Scotland. A.B., Trinity University, Toronto, 1894, and A.M., 1897; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1903; Fellow in Greek, Johns Hopkins University, 1897- 
98; Lecturer in Greek, McGill University, 1900-02. 

William B. Huff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1889; A.M ; , University of Chicago, 1896; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1900; Lecture Assistant in Physics, Johns Hopkins University, 
1899-1900, Assistant in Physics, 1900-01, and Instructor in Physics, 1901-02. 

William Roy Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

A.B., University of Texas, 1897, and A.M., 1898; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1903; 
Acting Professor of History and Political Science, University of Colorado, 1900-01; 
Lecturer in History, Barnard College, 1901-02. 

J. Edmund Wright, M.A., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Liverpool, England. Graduate in Honours (Senior Wrangler) in the Cambridge Mathe- 
matical Tripos, 1900, and First Division, First Class, Mathematical Tripos, Part II, 
1901; Smith's Prizeman, 1902; Fellow of Trinity College, University of Cambridge, 
England. 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, A.B., Lecturer in English. 

A..B.. Bryn Mawr College, 1893; University of Oxford, England, and University of 
Leipsic, 1893-94, Sorbonne and College de France, and University of Leipsic,1894-95. 

Clarence Carroll Clark, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1896; Ph.D., Yale University, 1903; Scholar in 
Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins University, 1896-97; Instructor in Modern 
Languages, Toledo, Ohio, 1897-99: Scholar in English, Yale University, 1901-02; 
Student in Oxford, Cambridge, and Berlin, 1902-03. 

Karl Detlev Jessen, Ph.D., Associate in German Literature. 

Winnemark, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. A.B., University of Chicago, 1896, and 
Fellow in German, 1897-98; Ph.D., University of Berlin, 1901 ; University of Chicago, 
1895-98; University of Kiel, 1899; University of Berlin, 1898-99, 1899-1901 ; Acting 
Professor of Modern Languages, Eureka College, 1896; Instructor in German, Iowa 
State University, 1897; Instructor in German, Harvard University, 1901-03, and 
Lecturer on German Literature and Aesthetics, 1904. 

Tenney Frank, Ph.D., Associate in Latin. 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1898, and A.M., 1899; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1903; 
Fellow, University of Chicago, 1899-1901; Assistant and Associate in Latin, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1901-04. 

David Hilt Tennent, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology. 

S.B., Olivet College, 1900; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1902-04; Bruce Fel- 
low, Johns Hopkins University, 1904; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1904. 



Nettie Maria Stevens, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Morphology. 

A.B., Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 1899, and A.M., 1900; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1903. Student in Hopkins Seaside Laboratory, Pacific Grove, Summer, 1897; 
1898, 1899, and 1900; Graduate Scholar in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1900-01; 
Holder of the President's European Fellowship, and Student, Zoological Station, 
Naples, and University of Wiirzburg, 1901-02; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1902-03, and Research Fellow in Biology, 1903-04; Carnegie Research Assistant, 
1904-05. 

Carleton Fairchild Brown, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 
Philology. 

A.B., Carleton College, 1888; A. M., Harvard University, 1901, and Ph.D. 1903. 
Shattuck Scholar, Harvard University, 1901-03; Instructor in English, Harvard 
University, 1903-05. 

Caroline Louise Ransom, Ph.D., Associate in the History of Art and 
Classical Archeology. 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1896; A.M., University of Chicago, 1900 and Ph.D., 1905; 
Fellow, University of Chicago, 1898-99, 1903-05; Student in Berlin, London, Paris, 
and Athens, 1900-03. 

James Barnes, Ph.D., Associate in Physics. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia. B.A., Dalhousie University, Honours in Mathematics and 
Physics, 1899, and M.A., 1900; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1904. Holder 
of 1851 Exhibition Science Research Scholarship, 1900-03; Fellow, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1903-04, and Assistant in Physics, 1904-06. 

Richard Thayer Holbrook, Ph.D., Associate in French Philology and 
Italian. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893; Ph. D., Columbia University, 1902. Sorbonne, College 
de France, Ecole des Chartes, 1893-94, 1895-96; Student in Italy and University of 
Berlin, 1894-95; Student in Spain, 1901; Tutor in the Romance Languages and 
Literatures, Yale University, 1896-1901, and Columbia University, 1902-06. 

Robert Matteson Johnston, M.A., Associate Professor of History. 

B.A., University of Cambridge, 1889, and M.A., 1900. Lecturer in History, Harvard 
University, 1904-07; Mt. Holyoke College, 1904-06; Simmons College, 1905-06. 

Theodore de Leo de Laguna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., University of California, 1896, and A.M., 1899; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1901. 
Teacher in the Government Schools of the Philippine Islands, 1901-04; Honorary 
Fellow and Assistant in Philosophy, Cornell University, 1904-05; Assistant Profes- 
sor of the Philosophy of Education, University of Michigan, 1905-07. 

Charles Clarence Williamson, Ph.D., Associate in Economics and 
Politics. 

A. B., Western Reserve University, 1904; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1907. Assist- 
ant in Economics and Graduate Student, Western Reserve University, First 
Semester, 1904-05; Scholar in Political Economy, University of Wisconsin, 1904- 
05; Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin, 1905-06; University Fellow in 
Political Economy, Columbia University, 1906-07; Research Assistant of the 
Carnegie Institution, 1905-07. 

George Shannon Forbes, Ph.D., Associate in Chemistry. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1902, A.M., 1904, and Ph.D., 1905. Lecturer in Physical 
Chemistry, Harvard University, 1905-06; John Harvard Fellow, and Student in the 
University of Berlin, 1906-07. 

Daniel Webster Ohern, Ph.D., Associate in Geology. 

A.B., Drake University, 1898: A.M., University of West Virginia, 1899; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1907. Assistant in Greek, University of West Virginia, 
1899-1901, and Instructor in Greek, 1901-03; Assistant in Geology, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1903-05; Scholar in Geology, 1905-06, and Fellow in Geology, 1906-07. 

Hans Weyhe, Ph.D., Associate in German. 

Dessau, Germany. Ph.D., University of Leipsic, 1903; University of Munich, 1897; 
University of Leipsic, 1897-99; University of Berlin, 1899-1901. 

Marion Reilly, A.B., Dean of the College and Reader in Philosophy. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901; Graduate Student, Brvn Mawr College, 1901-02, 
1903, 1903-06; Newnham College, University of Cambridge, Spring, 1907. 



Clarence Errol Ferree, A.M., M.S., Lecturer in Psychology. 

B. S., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1900, A.M., 1901, and M.S., 1902. Fellow in Psy- 
chology, Cornell University, 1902-03; Assistant in Psychology, Cornell University, 
1903-07. 

Clarence D. Ashley, LL.M., LL. D., J.D., Non-Resident Lecturer in Law. 

A.B., Yale University, 1873; University of Berlin, 1876-78; LL.B., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1880; J.D., New York University, 1903; Professor of Law, Metropolis Law 
School, 1891-95; Professor of Law, New York University, 1895-1903; Vice-Dean of 
the Faculty of Law in charge of the Evening Division of the Law Department 
of New York University, 1895-96; Dean of the Faculty of Law, New York Uni- 
versity. 1896-1908. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., N on-Resident Lecturer in English Diction. 

Tynemouth, England. M.A., University of London, 1900. Special Lecturer in 
Elocution, Johns Hopkins University, 1901; Special Lecturer in Elocution, Uni- 
versity of California, 1902. 

Rose Chamberlin, M.A., Reader in German. 

Great Yarmouth, England. M.A., Trinity College, Dublin, 1905; Graduate in Honours, 
Newnham College, University of Cambridge, England, 1886 (Mediaeval and Mod- 
ern Languages Tripos, First Class). 

Harriet Randolph, Ph.D., Demonstrator in Biology and Reader in 
Botany. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1889; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1889-90; 
University of Zurich, 1890-92; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1892. 

Katharine Fullerton, A.M., Reader in English. 
A.B., Radcliffe College, 1900, and A.M., 1901. 

Regina Katharine Crandall, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Smith College, 1890; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1902. Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in History, 1894-96; Assistant in History, 
Smith College, 1896-99; Instructor in History. Wellesley College, 1899-1900. 

Orie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1888. Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1903. Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1901-03, and Fellow in English, 1903-04. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1897. Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1896-97, and Fellow in English, 1897-98. College de France, First Semester, 
1898-99. 

Abby Kirk, A.B., Reader in Elementary Greek. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1892. Reader in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-98. 

Marion Parris, A.B., Reader in Economics and Politics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901. Graduate Student, Brvn Mawr College, 1902-05, 
Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1905-06; Bryn Mawr College Research Fellow 
and Student in Economics and Politics, University of Vienna, 1906-07. 

Helen Ward, A.B., Reader in English. 

A.B., Radcliffe College, 1900. Graduate Student in English, Radcliffe College, 1902-04. 
Bertha Marion Pillsbury, A.M., Reader in English. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1895: A.M., Radcliffe College, 1898. Radcliffe College, 
1896-98, 1906-07. Instructor in English, University of Illinois, 1904-06. 

Grace Maxwell Fernald, Ph.D., Reader in Education and Demonstrator 
in Psychology. 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1903, and A.M., 1905; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1907 
Mt. Holyoke College, 1903-04; Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-06 • 
Fellow in Psychology, University of Chicago, 1906-07. 

Maud Downing, A.B., Reader in Semitic Languages. 

A.B., University of Toronto, 1902. Graduate Student, University of Toronto 1902- 
03 ; Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-07 



Grace Mead Andrus de Laguna, Ph.D., Reader in Philosophy. 
A.B., Cornell University, 1903, and Ph.D., 1906. Sage Scholar in Philosophy, Cornell 
University, 1903-05; Alice Freeman Palmer Fellow of Wellesley College, 1905-06. 

Clara Leonora Nibolay, Ph.D., Reader in Elementary French. 

Berlin, Germany. L.L.A., St. Andrew's Universitv, 1900; A.M., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1901, and Ph.D., 1907. University College, Nottingham, England, 1892- 
97. Student in France and Germany, 1903. 

Bertha Cornelia Norris, A.B., Reader in Latin. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904. 

Frances Lowater, B.Sc, Ph.D., Demonstrator in Physics. 

Nottingham, England. B.Sc, University of London, 1900; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr Collegei 
1906: University College, Nottingham. 1888-91, 1892-93; Newnham College, Uni- 
versity of Cambridge, England, 1891-92; Fellow in Physics, Bryn Mawr College 
1896-97, and Graduate Scholar in Physics, 1897-98; Secretary of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1898-99. 

Gertrude Langden Heritage, A.M., Demonstrator in Chemistry. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1899. Graduate Student in Chemistry, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1896-97, 1898-1900, and Graduate Student in Mathematics and Chem- 
istry, 1897-98. 

Una McMahan, A.B., Demonstrator in History of Art and Classical 
Archaeology. 

A.B., Smith College, 1894. Graduate Student in Greek and Classical Archaeology, 
University of Chicago, 1894-95, 1896-99; University of Berlin, 1900-01; Ameri- 
can School of Classical Studies, Rome, 1902-04; Studied in Oxford, 1906, 1907. 

Anna Bell Lawther, A.B., Secretary of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1897. Assistant Bursar, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-1900; 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99, 1904-05; Warden of Merion Hall, 
1904, 1904-05. 

Ethel McCoy Walker, A.M., Recording Secretary and Appointment 
Secretary. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1894, and A.M., 1904. Graduate Scholar in Archaeology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1902-04; Recording Secretary, 1904-06, and Appointment Sec- 
retary, 1905-07. 

Isadore Gilbert Mtjdge,* Ph.B., B.L.S., Librarian. 

Ph.B., Cornell University, 1897. B.L.S., New York State Library School, 1900. 
Reference Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Economy, University of 
Illinois, 1900-03. 

Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S., Acting Librarian. 

B.L., University of Nebraska, 1885; B.L.S., New York State Library School, 1902. 
Acting Librarian and Adjunct Professor of Bibliography, University of Nebraska, 
1892-97; Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Economy, University of Illinois, 
1897; Classifier, Iowa State University, 1898; Second Assistant Librarian, Los 
Angeles Public Library, 1898-99 and Librarian, 1900-05. 

Edna Lucy Goss, B.L.S., Head Cataloguer. 

B.L.S., University of Illinois, 1902. Reference Assistant, Library of the University 
of Illinois, 1902-03; Cataloguer, Library of the University of California, 1903-05; 
Librarian, Illinois State Laboratory of Natural History, 1905-06. 

Marian Cinderella Bell, A.B., B.L.S., Assistant Cataloguer. 

A.B., University of Nebraska, 1904; B.L.S., University of Illinois, 1906. Assistant in 
School of Education Library, University of Chicago, Summer, 1906. 

Bessie Homer Jennings, Special Cataloguer. 

Graduate, Drexel Institute Library School, 1900. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

Emma Isabella Sisson, Assistant Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

Mary Warren Taylor, Keeper of Gymnastic Records. 

* Granted leave of absence for the year 1907-08. 



10 

Ella B. Everitt, M.D., Visiting Physician of the College . 
Thomas F Branson, M.D., Attending Physician of the College 
John H. Musser, M.D., Consultant Physician in Cardiac Cases. 
George dk Schweinitz, M.D., Consultant Oculist. 
Helen Mttrvhy, M.D., Examining Oculist. 



TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL KEPOKT. 

To the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College: 

The President of the College respectfully submits the 
following report for the twenty-second academic year of Bryn 
Mawr College, from October 1, 1906, to September 30, 1907. 

Important changes took place in the membership and 
constitution of the governing boards of the college during 
the year 1906-07. 

The death of Mr. Thomas Scattergood of Philadelphia, 
a member of the Board of Trustees and also of the Board of 
Directors of Bryn Mawr College, occurred at Naples on the 
18th of April, 1907, in the sixty-sixth year of his age. 
Mr. Scattergood was elected a member of the Board of Trus- 
tees in 1894, and a member of the Board of Directors in 
1906, and from the time of his election in 1894 until his 
death was an active member of the Einance Committee and 
also of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. Except 
when prevented by illness, he was seldom, if ever, absent from 
meetings of the board or of the committees on which he 
served, and his sound judgment and wide financial experi- 
ence were of great assistance to the college. His earnest in- 
terest and valuable services will be deeply missed. The 
memorial resolutions passed by the Board of Trustees and by 
the Board of Directors will be found in Appendix XI of this 
report. 

Mr. Henry Tatnall of Philadelphia, who had been 
elected a Trustee in 1894 and a member of the Board of 
Directors in 1906, and had served the college as Treas- 
urer since 1894, as a member of the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds since 1894, and as Chairman of the Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds since 1904, resigned from both 
boards in May, 1907, on account of pressure of other business. 
His resignation was accepted with much regret. 

At a meeting of the Trustees held October 19th, 1906, 

11 



the Board of Directors of the Trustees of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege was organised in accordance with the changes made in 
the charter of the college in the preceding year, and the fol- 
lowing sixteen Directors were elected to serve for the ensuing 
year: Charles Hartshorne, David Scull, Albert K. Smiley, 
Edward Bettle, Jr., Howard Comfort, Justus C. Strawbridge, 
Thomas Scattergood, Henry Tatnall, James Wood, Rufus M. 
Jones, Alexander C. Wood, M. Carey Thomas, Francis R. 
Cope, Jr., Annie Crosby Emery Allinson, Elizabeth Butler 
Kirkbride, and Mary E. Garrett. Mrs. Allinson and Miss 
Kirkbride had been nominated, as provided for in the char- 
ter, by the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College to 
the Trustees for election as Directors, Mrs. Allinson to serve 
as a Director for six years and Miss Kirkbride to serve as a 
Director for three years ; and in accordance with the pro- 
visions of the charter authorising the election of a sixteenth 
director at large, Miss Garrett was elected by the Trustees 
to fill this position. 

The new Board of Directors met for the first time on 
]STovernber 16th, 1906, and assumed the governing and admin- 
istrative control of the college committed to it by the Board 
of Trustees. 

By the change which thus went into operation the 
graduates of the college were for the first time directly repre- 
sented in its control and for the first time also women were 
adequately represented in the Board. Erom the opening of 
the college in 1885 until 1902, when the President of the 
College was elected a Trustee, the Board of Trustees con- 
sisted entirely of men, and until the present year no other 
woman had been elected to the membership on the board. In 
this feature of its organisation Bryn Mawr College was 
unique, all other colleges for women having women on their 
governing boards. It is a matter for sincere congratulation 
that this important change in the government and adminis- 
tration of the college was made unanimously by the Board of 
Trustees. 

The organisation of privately endowed colleges and uni- 
versities in the United States is sui generis, and very differ- 
ent from the organisation of institutions of learning in other 



13 

countries. To all intents and purposes, privately endowed 
colleges are financially and academically independent of the 
government of the country, state, or city in which they are 
situated, and for this reason the possibilities of educational 
development, or of educational decline, are very great. Their 
boards of government are usually self -perpetuating, and as the 
services given by the members of these boards are entirely 
voluntary and without emolument of any kind the continu- 
ance of privately endowed institutions depends upon the self- 
sacrificing devotion and initiative of their trustees, or 
directors. For this reason it is highly desirable for such 
boards to secure as members a fair proportion of deeply- 
interested alumnse, whose ideals of scholarship have been 
formed by the college or university on whose governing boards 
they are later to serve. 

In France, Italy, and other European countries the uni- 
versities are state institutions, their instructors are state 
officials, and their academic standards are regulated by the 
state. This is true even in Germany, where the professors 
have the right of nominating to the state individual instruc- 
tors for appointment to professorships. In England the con- 
stitution of Oxford and Cambridge is more like that of 
our private foundations. They are free corporations orig- 
inally founded on an ecclesiastical basis governing themselves 
through their professors or lecturers, subject, however, to the 
control of their graduates. Although they operate under the 
general supervision of parliament, the state has nothing to do 
with their ordinary administration. They differ, however, 
from private university foundations in the United States in 
that their source of authority is in reality the majority vote 
of their masters of arts. They are not governed by self- 
perpetuating life boards. London University, Liverpool Uni- 
versity, Manchester and other newer foundations are corpora- 
tions operating under acts of parliament subject to the 
approval of the sovereign. London University, for example, 
is governed by a council operating under statutes and regula- 
tions approved by parliament, consisting of twenty-one mem- 
bers chosen from among the life governors or donors, the 



14 

proprietors or subscribers to the university, and the fellows 
or distinguished students of the university. 

In the United States, if we select from the list of the 
453 so-called colleges the 58 colleges which by common con- 
sent would rank first in educational standards, numbers of stu- 
dents, and endowment, we find that 39 of the 58 are private 
foundations, and that these 39 are by far the most important 
educational institutions in the United States, only six of the 
larger state universities coming into competition in these 
respects with the private foundations. It is noticeable that 
the two privately endowed universities recently founded in the 
west, Chicago and Leland Stanford, Jr., have given a great 
educational impetus to Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois and 
California, the four state universities in their immediate 
neighborhoods. Our state universities are governed immedi- 
ately by the state, their boards of regents being chosen 
directly by the people or the legislature, or by state officials. 
The state university of Michigan, for example, is governed 
by a board of nine regents, eight elected by popular vote, 
and the president of the university. The state university 
of Wisconsin is governed by a board of fifteen regents, thir- 
teen elected by the state legislature, and the state superin- 
tendent of public instruction and the president of the uni- 
versity ex-ojficio. The state university of Illinois is governed 
by twelve regents, nine elected by popular vote, two state 
officials and the president of the university. The university 
of California is governed by twenty-three regents, six state 
officials, the president of the university and sixteen regents 
appointed by the governor. 

A careful study of the development of privately endowed 
universities and their influence on state universities seems 
to me to show conclusively that the future of higher educa- 
tion in this country rests chiefly with the privately endowed 
institutions, and in the main with their self -perpetuating gov- 
erning boards. It becomes, then, a matter of vital educa- 
tional importance to organise these boards so that they may 
represent the most enlightened and progressive opinion. Such 
boards must not be so large as to make full and free dis- 
cussion impossible, or to necessitate committee management, 



15 

,-■,.. 

nor must they be so small that varied interests, especially 
the interest of the graduates of the college in their alma 
mater, cannot be adequately represented. I believe that in 
the organisation of our Board of Directors an important step 
has been taken in the solution of this problem. 

The Faculty of Bryn Mawr College met with a great loss 
in the death of Professor David Irons, Professor of Philoso- 
phy. Professor Irons died suddenly on January 23, 1907, 
after an illness lasting only a few hours. Although he had 
not been well for the past three or four years, his death was 
wholly unexpected. He was born in Dundee, Scotland, in 
1869, and was a distinguished graduate of the University of 
St. Andrews, where he took the degree of Master of Arts with 
honors in 1891, and afterwards won the Ramsey Scholarship, 
which he held from 1891 to 1892, and the Ferguson Scholar- 
ship, which he held from 1892 to 1894. He held a Fellow- 
ship in Philosophy at Cornell University in 1892, and studied 
at the Universities of Berlin and Jena from 1893 to 1894. 
He took the degree of doctor of philosophy at Cornell Univer- 
sity in 1894, and held the positions of Lecturer in Philosophy 
in Cornell University from 1894 to 1896, Acting Professor of 
Philosophy in the University of Vermont from 1896 to 1897, 
and Instructor in Philosophy in Cornell University from 
1897 to 1900. In 1900 he came to Bryn Mawr College as As- 
sociate in Philosophy and head of the department of philoso- 
phy. He was appointed Associate Professor in 1902, and 
Professor of Philosophy in 1905. His chief interest was in 
ethics. In 1903 he published a study on the Psychology of 
Ethics, and he was the author of a number of articles and 
reviews in the Philosophical Revieiv and other philosophical 
periodicals. A memorial service was held in Taylor Hall 
at three o'clock on January 26th, attended by the Directors, 
academic staff, and students of the college. The Rev. Charles 
Mellen Tyler, Sage Professor of the History and Philosophy 
of Religion, in Cornell University, a former teacher and 
personal friend of Professor Irons, conducted the service. 
Professor John Grier Hibben, Stuart Professor of Logic in 
Princeton University, another personal friend, Professor 



16 

George A. Barton, on behalf of the Faculty of Bryn Mawr 
College, and the President of the College were the other 
speakers. In Appendix XII to this report will be found 
the memorial resolutions adopted by the Board of Directors, 
the Faculty, the Alumnse Association, the Graduate Club, 
and the Undergraduate Association of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege. The Undergraduate Association and the Graduate Club 
purchased for $500 Professor Irons' library of 541 volumes, 
an unusually complete collection of English philosophical 
works of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and pre- 
sented it to the college as a memorial of their affection and 
gratitude. 

Two of our senior professors, Professor Hermann Col- 
litz and Professor Charles McLean Andrews, resigned at the 
close of this academic year to accept professorships especially 
created for them in the Johns Hopkins University. Their 
loss to the college will be very great. 

Professor Hermann Oollitz, Ph.D., was called to Bryn 
Mawr from a privatdocentship in the University of Halle in 
the autumn of 1886 as Associate Professor of German Lit- 
erature and Language ; in 1897 he was elected Professor of 
Comparative Philology and German, which chair he has held 
until the present time. During these twenty-one years he 
has devoted himself unremittingly to the interests of the col- 
lege, and has also written and published extensively in his 
special field of work. Many graduate students of teutonic 
philology and German have studied with him and have testi- 
fied to the inspiration they have received from working under 
an active investigator in comparative teutonic philology. 
Professor Collitz is the most eminent scholar in this field in 
the United States. 

Professor Charles McLean Andrews, Ph.D., was elected 
Associate in History in Bryn Mawr College in the autumn 
of 1889, Associate Professor in 1894, and Professor of His- 
tory in 1898. He has been in the service of Bryn Mawr 
College for the past eighteen years. During this period Pro- 
fessor Andrew's courses in minor and major history, and his 
post-major and graduate work have been elected by many 
eager and well-trained students. He has been eminently sue- 



17 

cessful as a teacher in both graduate and undergraduate work. 
He has taken great pains to train his students, and has 
followed their later work after they have left the college with 
a sympathy and interest which are very rare. Professor An- 
drews has also added much to the reputation of the college 
by his published work, and is at the present time one of the 
chief authorities on colonial history in the United States. 

Miss Helen Strong Hoyt, A.M., Bryn Mawr College, re- 
signed the readership in English which she had held for nine 
years, at the close of the year. Much of the present excellent 
organisation of the work in English composition is due to her 
initiative and interest. She will be greatly missed in the 
English department. 

A full list of other changes in the faculty and staff of 
the college, and the academic history of the new members of 
the faculty may be found in the first appendix to my report. 

In the reorganisation of the work in history made neces- 
sary by the resignation of Professor Andrews it was decided 
to appoint an historian who had specialised in European his- 
tory, as Dr. William Roy Smith, our Associate in History, 
is interested in American history. In addition to the appro- 
priation usually made to the department of history, the Direc- 
tors appropriated the sum of $1,000 for the purchase of books 
on European history. 

Eor the first time since October, 1897, when the chair 
in psychology was established, adequate facilities were pro- 
vided for the work in psychology in the new library building. 
A gift of $1,000 from Miss Garrett, a member of our Board 
of Directors, made it possible for Professor Leuba to equip 
his new laboratories with the necessary psychological appa- 
ratus. In granting Professor Leuba leave of absence for the 
year 1907-08, the Directors acting on his recommendation 
appointed as his substitute an experimental psychologist, 
Clarence Errol Eerree, A.M., M.S., a pupil of Professor 
Edward Bradford Titchener, of Cornell University, and later 
an instructor in his laboratory. After Professor Leuba's 
return Mr. Eerree will organise undergraduate and graduate 
instruction in experimental psychology. 



18 

For several years past it has become evident to our scien- 
tific faculty, and especially to our professors of chemistry, 
that courses in physical chemistry must be provided. For 
the past two years instruction in this subject has been 
given by Dr. David Wilbur Horn of the department of 
chemistry, but the development of the work has been much 
hampered by lack of a proper laboratory and an adequate sup- 
ply of apparatus. George Shannon Forbes, Ph.D., a pupil 
of Professor Theodore W. Richards of Harvard University, 
and a former demonstrator in his physical chemical labora- 
tory, was appointed by the Board of Directors to fill the 
vacancy in chemistry caused by Dr. Horn's resignation. A 
laboratory for physical chemistry was provided in Dalton 
Hall during the summer, and a gift of $600 for apparatus 
will make it possible to give a satisfactory graduate course in 
physical chemistry during the ensuing year. 

For the past seven years, indeed from the year 1899, 
when a committee of the faculty drew up the present Merit 
Law (which was passed by the Faculty and approved by the 
Trustees in the same year, but did not come into full opera- 
tion until June, 1902), it has been evident to the faculty 
and the officers of administration, including the wardens of 
the halls of residence, that special pains must be taken to 
raise the academic standards of the body of undergraduate 
students. Not only the Merit Law, but many other regula- 
tions of the faculty have been passed with this object in 
view. The faculty's legislation of the past few years shows 
a strongly marked tendency not to permit exceptions to the 
rules of the faculty, but to insist upon the students individu- 
ally and collectively accepting, the standards of the faculty in 
academic work. In December, 1905, the Merit Law was 
added to and extended, and these additional provisions were 
duly approved by the Board of Trustees. These requirements 
came into operation during the academic year covered by this 
report. Every student who at the end of her junior year, or in 
February of her senior year, has received grades below merit 
in as many as one-half of the hours that she has taken out of 
the total of 120 hours which must be offered for the bachelor's 



19 

degree is required to take one additional year in order to grad- 
uate. During this additional year and during the year which 
would have been her senior year had she been graduated in 
four years, she is put on probation and her work is carefully 
planned and watched by the petition committee of the fac- 
ulty. She is given by this committee as nearly as possible 
twelve hours, a certain number of which shall count towards 
her degree, and in addition she is required to take a certain 
amount of specialised work in small classes which does not 
count towards her degree, but which will enable the petition 
committee to judge whether she is studying seriously. A brief 
summary of the practical working of the Merit Law and of 
these additional provisions may be found on page 50 of the 
report of the Assistant to the President, through whose office 
all such faculty rules are put into operation. Also in 1905, 
the Trustees passed a rule, to go into operation in the year 
1906-07, that no student who has not obtained the grade of 
merit in as many as one-half the hours which she has taken 
out of the 120 hours required for the bachelor's degree may 
be permitted to take part in any college entertainment requir- 
ing preparation, or to hold any lucrative office in the gift of 
the college; and in January, 1906, they extended this rule to 
cover also nominations for any executive office in the Students' 
Association for Self-Government, the Undergraduate Associa- 
tion, the Christian Union, the League for the Service of 
Christ, the Editorial Board of The Lantern,, and the Students' 
Building Committee. 

In view of the above action taken by the Trustees and 
Faculty, it is worthy of note that at the luncheon given at the 
President's house to the graduating class of 1907, the senior 
who had been elected European Eellow stated, with the 
approval and assent of the other members of the class, that 
since the close of their sophomore year, that is, since June, 
1905, it had seemed to them that the academic standards of 
the college had appreciably risen and that it had again 
become the custom among the students, as opposed to the 
practice during their freshman and sophomore years, to talk 
over with one another subjects discussed in their lectures or 
in the scientific laboratories. 



20 

Although an excellent beginning in raising the standard 
of work and thought among the undergraduates has been 
made, careful attention must be given to the subject through- 
out the next few years. 

The college officers of administration are the same as in 
1894-95, whereas the number of students has increased by 
54 per cent. It became evident several years ago that we had 
outgrown our organisation. It has become impossible for the 
President of the College and the Assistant to the President, 
even with the assistance of the wardens as assistant advisers 
to the freshmen, to give the students the necessary advice in 
regard to their selection of courses, or to follow them as 
they should be followed with personal advice and counsel 
throughout their academic courses. 

This matter of personal advice is probably the most 
difficult problem to be solved in college education in the 
United States. Various colleges have attacked it in differ- 
ent ways. In some colleges the students are divided up 
among the members of the faculty, who act as student ad- 
visers, but careful examination of the working of this system 
leads me to believe that it does not accomplish satisfactory 
results. The first interest of scholarly and productive mem- 
bers of a progressive faculty is in their teaching and research 
work, and even if the plan works well when it is first begun, 
the inevitable tendency seems to be for the members of the 
faculty either to neglect the interests of the students com- 
mitted to their care, or to become involved in so much admin- 
istrative work that they lose their position as productive 
scholars. Such a solution could not in any case be consid- 
ered at Bryn Mawr, both because of the scholarly reputation 
of its faculty and because a majority of them are men, many 
of them unmarried. It has sometimes been suggested that 
older students might direct the work of younger students, but 
this would be at best a makeshift, because, as far as possible, 
experience should direct inexperience, and there are many 
mistakes that are common to youth as such, and these mistakes 
would be made almost as frequently by older as by younger 
students. A year ago Princeton University adopted the 



21 

radical plan of adding forty-seven so-called preceptors (among 
whom are two former members of our Bryn Mawr College 
Faculty) to its teaching staff, with the rank of Assistant Pro- 
fessor and salaries averaging from $1,800 to $2,000 a year, 
paid from the interest of a fund raised by its alumni for the 
purpose. Each preceptor meets a little group of about twelve 
students frequently for reports and conferences on the courses 
they are taking, and prescribes and talks over with them re- 
lated reading. This experiment is now in its second year of 
trial and is said to work well. Apart, however, from its 
expense, which puts it out of the question for Bryn Mawr, it 
remains to be seen whether such personally conducted students 
will prove to have the native independence of mind developed 
in the best students by more independent methods of instruc- 
tion, and also whether preceptors of the kind Princeton has ap- 
pointed — and of the kind colleges must obtain if the system 
is to work well — will be content to remain long as precep- 
tors. The probability is that these preceptors will wish to 
deliver lectures like the other members of the Princeton 
faculty, and the question to be answered by experience is 
also whether, if they are not permitted to do so (and it 
will be impossible under the' true preceptorial system), they 
will not deteriorate in mental quality like many of the 
Oxford and Cambridge dons who coach immature students 
for five to six hours a week for many years consecutively. 

In order to meet the situation at Bryn Mawr, at least in 
some measure, the President of the College recommended 
to the Executive Committee in May, 1906, that Marion 
Eeilly of Philadelphia, a graduate of Bryn Mawr College in 
1901, who has since that time been pursuing her grad- 
uate studies in mathematics and philosophy in our graduate 
school with the intention of taking the degree of doctor of 
philosophy, should be appointed Adviser to the Students and 
Reader in Philosophy for the year 1907-08, and that the 
Directors of the College should look forward to reviving the 
office of Dean of the College, which had been done away with 
in 1894, when the former dean was elected to the office of 
President of the College which she is now holding. This 
action was approved by the Executive Committee, and it 



22 

was arranged between Miss Reilly and the President of 
the College that she should spend the greater part of the 
year 1906-07 abroad completing her studies and that 
part of this time should be spent by her in residence at 
]STewnham College, Cambridge, so that she might become 
familiar with residential life in English woman's colleges. 
In May, 1907, the Board of Directors appointed Miss Reilly 
Dean of the College and Reader in Philosophy, the ap- 
pointment to take effect in 1907-08. Necessary and service- 
able as this appointment cannot fail to be, it must be remem- 
bered that it will only partially solve the question of giving 
the undergraduate students the necessary advice and assist- 
ance in their college life. It will be impossible for the new 
Dean of' the College to supervise even in moderate detail the 
study, reading, and arrangement of work of more than the 
150 or 200 juniors and seniors, who will be under her 
special care. It will still be necessary for the President 
of the College and the Assistant to the President to spend 
as much time in advising students as they have hitherto spent. 
The Directors should look forward to appointing in the near 
future two or three assistant advisers to aid the Dean of the 
College in her duties. 

The work of the tabulation of students' courses, the num- 
bers of students attending each of the college classes, the ar- 
rangement of the schedule of lectures, the apportioning of the 
lecture rooms, the announcement of courses of lectures, the 
publication of the college programme, graduate pamphlet, and 
notices of lectures and other public functions, the formulation 
and the enforcement of rules enacted by the Directors and 
by the Faculty, and the keeping of accurate academic statis- 
tics — in short, all the work which in the modern subdivision 
of administrative work in colleges and universities is as- 
signed to the different faculty deans — is now done, and ad- 
mirably done, by the Assistant to the President. The organi- 
sation of the college, however, as regards the careful watching 
of the work of the students needs to be strengthened, and 
the appointment of the Dean of the College will be of great 
assistance in this direction. 



23 

During the past few years it has also become clear to all 
those familiar with the administrative work of the college that 
the administrative officers, especially on the business side, 
have not kept pace with the growth of the college or the 
great increase in the number of college buildings which has 
taken place in recent years. Since 1905, when Miss Fred- 
erika M. Kerr resigned the office of bursar, which she had 
held for seventeen years, it has proved impossible to secure 
for the salary appropriated to this position by the Directors a 
bursar with sufficiently wide financial experience to relieve 
the President of the College from the constant weight of 
financial anxiety. It has been necessary for the president in 
recent years, especially during the construction of the power 
plant, Rockefeller Hall, and the Library, to spend almost one- 
third of her time in supervising and following the work of 
the bursar's office. Likewise the organisation of the busi- 
ness side of the college was entirely insufficient to care 
for our increased material plant and equipment. The col- 
lege buildings have more than doubled in value since 1904, 
and represent at the present time an expenditure of 
$1,463,299. Our college campus has also been greatly ex- 
tended. In 1904 all that part of our grounds lying between 
Radnor Hall and Low Buildings and also the present site of 
the Library, and the lawns stretching between the Library 
and Rockefeller Hall and across the Kennedy lot to Yarrow 
were uncared for. The supervision and care of the buildings 
and grounds has up to the present time been performed 
through the president's office with the competent assistance 
of Miss Caroline Lewis, Superintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds, who began her work at the college in 1897 
as private secretary to the president and was practically in 
charge of the buildings and grounds from this time. She 
was appointed Superintendent by the Trustees in the year 
1901. Miss Lewis has, however, been able to give only 
thirty-three Hours a week to this work. Indeed it would have 
been impossible under existing conditions to keep the build- 
ings and grounds in their present state of efficiency had not 
Miss Lewis's devotion to the college been supplemented by 
that of our head engineer, Mr. George C. G. Gray, who 



24 

has been in the service of the college since 1896, and has 
taken entire charge not only of the heating plant, but also 
of the plumbing and electric lighting. We also owe much 
in recent years to the faithful service of Mr. William H. 
Foley, who entered the service of the college in December, 
1904, as Assistant Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 
The reorganisation of the material side of the college had 
been postponed from year to year on account of the addi- 
tional expense involved, but in the beginning of the year 
covered by my report it seemed to the Trustees and to the 
President of the College that the time had come when the 
situation must be faced and the President of the College re- 
lieved by the appointment of two additional officers, a Comp- 
troller of Accounts who should be competent to take entire 
charge of the bursar's office and also to assist the Treasurer 
and Finance Committee in whatever ways they might direct, 
and a Business Manager, whose office hours should coincide 
with the hours of the numerous employees of the college, 
who should take charge of the buildings and grounds. The 
Trustees of the College had reached this conclusion before 
the Board of Directors was organised, and in appointing these 
two officers for the ensuing year the Board of Directors acted 
on the recommendation forwarded to them from the Trustees. 
Mr. James G. Forrester, who was at the time of his appoint- 
ment filling the position of manager of the Imperial Trusts 
Company of Canada, was appointed Comptroller; and Mr. 
Alexander H. Campbell, who was at the time of his appoint- 
ment holding the position of curator of St. Paul's School in 
Concord, 1ST. H., which post he had filled for the past eighteen 
years, was appointed Business Manager. Mr. Forrester began 
his duties in July, 1907, and Mr. Campbell on September 
23rd, 1907. Miss Lewis resigned her position as Superin- 
tendent to take effect September 30, 1907, and accepted again 
the position of Private Secretary to the President of the Col- 
lege which she had given up to become Superintendent at 
the request of the Trustees, in 1901. Our sincere thanks 
are due her for the unremitting attention she has given to our 
buildings and grounds during the past ten years of her faith- 
ful service. 



25 

After a careful consideration of the whole subject, the 
Directors decided that it was necessary to raise the price of 
board for all students in the college from $175 to $200, begin- 
ning with October, 1907. As the students are in residence 
exactly thirty-three weeks, this makes the price of board $6.06 
per week. In order that this increase may not prevent 
students of moderate income from attending the college, it 
was decided at the same time to reduce the rents of sixty 
rooms from $125 to $100, thus making the total cost of board 
and residence in these rooms the same as it has hitherto been 
for students occupying less expensive rooms, namely $300. 
An effort will be made to distribute equally throughout the 
six halls of residence these cheaper rooms. Students who are 
unable to pay more than the minimum price for board and 
residence will be required to file a statement to this effect in 
the secretary's office, and the lowest priced rooms will be re- 
served for such students. As this reduction will make the 
total room rent yielded by the sixty rooms in question less 
by $1,500, it was further decided to raise the rent of a suf- 
ficient number of the larger single rooms and more attractive 
double suites $25 a year, so as to make the increase in their 
rental equal the decrease in the rental of the cheaper rooms. 
Tables of the room rents as they are during this year, and as 
they will be according to the arrangement for 1907-08, are 
appended. 

The room rents in 1907-08 will amount to only $175 
more than in 1906-07, so closely has the balance between the 
average increase and the average decrease been observed. 
The cost per year, including infirmary fees, for under- 
graduates living in the sixty cheaper rooms is $505. The 
cost per year for other undergraduates occupying single rooms 
is $530, although of course many are living more expensively 
in double or single suites. 



26 



I. Table of Room Rents in the Year 1906-07. 



Rents. 


100 


125 


150 175 


200 


225 


250 


300 


350 


400 


Total 


Pembroke East 


9 


15 


12 


4 





16 


4 


10 








70 


Pembroke West 


9 


13 


10 


2 





16 


6 


6 


4 





66 


Rockefeller . . . 


8 


16 


3 


9 


4 


16 


12 


8 


3 





79 







5 


8 


36 


2 








1 





1 


53 


Denbigh 


17 


8 


12 


10 


11 


8 


3 











69 


Radnor 


8 


35 





8 











4 








55 




*51 


92 


45 i 69 

! 


17 


56 


25 


29 


7 


1 


392 



^Reserved for graduate students. 



II. Table of Room Rents as Rearranged March, 1907. 



Rents 


75 


i 

100 125 


150 


175 


200 


225 


250 


275 300 350 Total 


Pembroke East 


9 


11 


8 


7 


4 





4 


12 


4 


6 


4 


69 


Pembroke West 


9 


10 


4 


5 


6 





4 


14 


4 


6 


4 


66 


Rockefeller 


8 


14 


2 


3 


3 


10 


16 


12 





8 


3 


79 


Merion 





5 


4 


5 


16 


16 


3 


1 








5 


55 


Denbigh 


17 


10 


3 


6 


5 


12 


8 


7 


1 








69 


Radnor 


8 
*51 


10 
t60 


18 
39 


5 
31 


4 
38 


6 

44 



35 


1 

47 



9 


3 
23 



16 


55 


393 



"Reserved for graduate students. fReserved for poorer students. 



27 

In the academic year 1900-01 the tuition fee was raised 
from $125 to $150 and board from $150 to $175, and again 
in the year 1903-04 the tuition was raised from $150 to 
$200, so that since 1900 the total cost of board, room rent 
and tuition has been raised from $400 to $500 for stu- 
dents needing to economise, and to $525 for all other students. 
This increase does not represent the rise in the cost of living 
which has taken place during these seven years. It was, 
however, sufficient to lessen the numbers of undergraduate 
students, in the year 1902-03, when the higher charges began 
to be felt by incoming students, as will be seen by reference 
to table 'No. I in the report of the Assistant to the President. 
It is probable that the present increase will check our growth 
for a few years, but this is not to be regretted, as we have at 
the present time only thirty-seven unoccupied rooms in the 
college. 

No change has been made in the price of board and room 
rent for graduates, which remains as in 1885, the increase in 
board having been balanced by a corresponding reduction in 
room rent. Practically all graduate students are fitting 
themselves by further study for the profession of teaching, 
and in most cases have earned by teaching the money to pay 
for this further study. It would therefore be a serious error 
in educational policy to increase their expenses, and would 
defeat one of the objects which the Founder of the college 
specifies in his will when he says that he wishes Bryn Mawr 
College "to educate teachers of a high order." 

The new schedule of entrance examinations adopted by 
the Faculty and approved by the Directors, will go into 
operation in the spring examinations of 1908. The time of 
examinations has been extended from five to eight days. The 
advanced matriculation examinations in Minor Latin, Trigo- 
nometry and Solid Geometry have been placed on Monday and 
Tuesday of the second week, and the three examinations in 
Greek, which are taken by the smallest number of students, 
have been placed on Monday of the first week. This change is 
made so that in future it will not be necessary for candidates 



28 

to be in the examination room more than three hours on any 
morning, or more than two hours on any afternoon. 

• Important changes in the calendar of the college year, to 
go into operation in 1907-08, were made by the Faculty and 
approved by the Directors. These changes removed certain 
irregularities in beginning and ending the Christmas vaca- 
tion, and made the number of working days in each semes- 
ter as nearly as possible equal. The holiday now given 
on Washington's birthday was cancelled and this holiday was 
added to the one day's vacation hitherto given at the begin- 
ning of the second semester, thus securing for the students a 
vacation of three days between the ending of the examina- 
tions of the first semester and the beginning of the second 
semester. It was also adopted as a principle that work should 
begin after the summer, Christmas and Easter vacations as a 
rule on Wednesday or Thursday, and that the college should 
close as nearly as possible on Wednesday of the week before 
Christmas, thus giving the students time to make their Christ- 
mas preparations without taking the time from their college 
work. Except Thanksgiving, all vacations will now close in 
the middle of the week and students will no longer be tempted 
to travel or unpack their trunks on Sundays. The Eaculty 
also adopted registration under penalty of punishment at the 
beginning of the second semester. 

Various fees and charges imposed by the Directors came 
into effect during this year, as follows : for every division of 
the entrance examinations cancelled and repeated a fee of 
five dollars ; for every entrance condition taken after a 
student has received a certificate of admission a fee of three 
dollars ; for every change of room from one hall of residence 
to another a fee of ten dollars ; for every change of room in 
a hall of residence a fee of five dollars ; for each diploma, in- 
cluding graduation expenses a fee of ten dollars additional, 
or twenty dollars in all; for every examination deferred on 
account of illness, or as a penalty by the Eaculty for late 
registration a fee of five dollars. Hitherto only conditioned 
and advanced standing examinations have been charged for. 



29 

The Directors further ordered that all fees paid by students 
for examinations of any kind, with the exception of entrance 
examination fees, should be added to the appropriation for 
books for the library for the current year. 

In certain college matters it has been very difficult to 
regulate the actions of the students without the assistance 
of fines. For example, in the preceding twenty years it had 
proved practically impossible to induce students by persuasion 
or admonition to hand in their registration of courses in time 
for the office to plan the work of the different departments. 
After the Directors passed the rule authorising the imposition 
of a fine of five dollars for late registration of courses, which 
went into effect in the college year 1905-06, there was no 
further difficulty. There had been constant trouble in the 
gymnasium both because students had neglected to take the 
required hours of exercise and drill, and because they 
failed repeatedly to keep their appointments for measure- 
ments and strength tests with the Director of Athletics and 
Gymnastics and the Visiting Physician. On recommendation 
of the President of the College and the Director of Athletics 
and Gymnastics the Directors authorised the imposition 
of a fine of one dollar for each period of exercise omitted 
during the college year, and in addition passed a rule requir- 
ing the student to make up the missing periods of exercise 
for which she had been fined within two weeks after the end 
of gymnastic work in the spring, under penalty of being re- 
quired to exercise for double the number of periods missed 
and of paying an additional fine of two dollars for each 
doubled period. These rules were also extended to non-resi- 
dent students, who are thus for the first time required, under 
penalty, to take the required amount of exercise. A fine was 
also imposed on students who missed their physical examina- 
tions, and on those who came late. The rules concerning 
fines went into operation in the second semester of the year 
covered by my report, and at once solved the difficulties 
with which we had been struggling since the opening of the 
college. Not only were practically all required periods of 
exercise taken within the required time, but students came 



30 

promptly to the gymnasium for their physical measurements. 
In the year 1905-06 it took the Director of Athletics and 
Gymnastics and her assistant 136 hours to measure the same 
number of students who were measured in 85 hours after the 
rule concerning fines went into operation. This saving of 
time was due solely to the promptness with which the students 
kept their appointments. It was voted by the Directors that 
the fines imposed for gymnastic work should be appropriated 
for the purchase of apparatus and equipment for the gym- 
nasium. 

Mrs. Anna Woerishoffer of ISTew York City founded, 
in connection with our graduate school, the Anna Ottendorfer 
Memorial Research Fellowship for the Study of Teutonic 
Philology and German Language and Literature in memory 
of her mother, the late Anna Ottendorfer. She handed over 
to the Trustees one hundred shares of United States Steel 
preferred stock of the par value of $10,000, which at present 
yields $700 a year. This fellowship is to be open for com- 
petition to women capable of independent research who are 
graduates of Bryn Mawr College or any other college of 
good standing and have completed at least one year of grad- 
uate work in Bryn Mawr College. It is a very welcome gift 
and is the first true research fellowship founded at Bryn 
Mawr College. 

This year marks the completion of the building opera- 
tions begun in June, 1902, when the trustees, alumnae, and 
friends of the college succeeded in raising $250,000 for the 
library, and thus secured Mr. John D. Rockefeller's generous 
gift of $250,000, which, through his great kindness and the 
interest and sympathy of his son, Mr. John D. Rockefeller, 
Jr., was later increased to $455,000. A legacy of $50,000 
left to the college by the late Mr. Joseph E. Gillingham en- 
abled the trustees to complete the north wing of the library 
building. The building of this wing was begun in May, 
1906, and finished in February, 1907. In the summer of 
1906 about 50,000 books were moved from Taylor Hall into 
the stack and seminary rooms of the new library building, 
and we began using the main library building and the 



31 

south wing when the college reopened in the autumn. In 
February, 1907, the seminary libraries were moved into the 
north wing. 

The library is built of gray stone in the so-called col- 
legiate Gothic, or Jacobean Gothic, style of architecture 
of the period of 1630, this being the date of Wadham 
College, Oxford, which was selected as a model for the 
building. The library forms three sides of an enclosed 
quadrangle surrounded with cloisters. The Class of 1901 
gave the stone fountain in the centre of the quadrangle and 
the electric motor operating it. The main east front, 
174 feet long, faces Taylor Hall at a distance of about 
150 feet. Its principal entrance is opposite the tower door 
of Taylor Hall and is connected with it by a broad cement 
walk. The main building contains a three-story stack with 
accommodations for 88,000 volumes, and above this a large 
reading room extending over the entire main building, with 
large north and south end windows and eleven large windows 
in the long east front and in the garden front to the west. 
The tracery of these windows is copied from the windows 
of the dining hall of Wadham College, the President of the 
College having obtained the permission of the Warden of 
Wadham to send a photographer from London to take large 
photographs of them. The entrance porch is an exact 
copy of the entrance porch of Oriel College, Oxford, as it is 
shown in photographs and drawings before it was rebuilt 
after the fire in 1752. The reading room contains desks for 
136 readers. Each desk is screened to a height of two feet, 
as in the British Museum reading room, to secure privacy. 
ISTo books of reference are kept in the reading room. The 
alumnse of the college gave two thousand dollars to panel 
the reading room in oak after the design of the Wadham din- 
ing hall. The teakwood doors leading into this room and the 
carved teakwood screen in which they are set were given by the 
undergraduate students who were studying in the college in 
the year 1904-05, as a memorial to Mary Helen Ritchie, 
former Secretary of the college, who died during this year. 
The Class of 1899 has raised $1,000 for the gift of a large 
bronze clock to be placed in the main reading room connected 



32 

with a master clock which is intended to control the clocks in 
all the college buildings. 

Beyond the reading room in the south wing are the news- 
paper and magazine rooms. In the corresponding north wing 
is the art seminary and lecture room, containing the collec- 
tions of photographs, vases and coins. On the floor below, 
on either side of the stack, are offices for the librarian and 
cataloguers, a study room for non-resident students, four cloak 
rooms, and two telephone closets. The north and south wings 
run parallel, about two hundred feet in length, and contain 
twelve seminary rooms for Greek, Latin, English, German, 
French, Italian, Spanish, philosophy, mathematics, history, 
economics, Semitics, and psychology, two seminary lecture 
rooms accommodating about fifteen students each, four inter- 
view rooms, a reading room and library for the use of the 
Students' Christian Union and League, twenty-four professors' 
offices arranged so that two offices adjoin the seminary room 
in each department, and the office of the Dean of the College. 
In addition, the first floor of the south wing contains two large 
laboratories for experimental psychology, a seminary room, 
a professor's office, a photographing room, and a lecture room 
seating thirty students. The basement in the north wing 
contains rooms for the Monograph Committee of the Faculty, 
the Alumnse Association, the Students' Association for Self- 
Government, and fire-proof safe rooms for the records and 
archives of the college. The library was built and furnished 
at a cost of $342,120.82, and we have in hand gifts, amount- 
ing to about $4,000, which will be used next summer to 
complete the decoration of the building. 

The library with members of the library force in attend- 
ance is open continuously from eight o'clock in the morning 
until ten o'clock in the evening on week-days and from two 
o'clock until ten on Sundays. It is also heated and lighted 
all night, for the convenience of professors who wish to use 
their offices or seminary rooms, each member of the faculty 
being provided with a pass key. 

The library has proved admirably adapted to its purpose, 
and the facilities it has offered, together with the new rules 



33 

adopted by the Library Committee, have greatly increased its 
usefulness and the circulation of books. Reference is 
made to the Librarian's report for further details. 

In assigning the offices to members of the faculty the 
Directors requested that each professor occupying an office 
should give at least two consultation hours a week, announc- 
ing in the college publications and on the bulletin boards the 
hours when students would be at liberty to come for confer- 
ence and consultation. These consultation hours have been of 
great assistance to the students in their academic work. 

After moving the library out of Taylor Hall, the Direc- 
tors restored Taylor Hall to the condition in which it was 
originally. The doors between the central room and the east 
and west rooms on either side, which had been used as the 
library, were closed, the central room was converted into a 
professors' consultation room, and the west room, now called 
D, was seated with 85 desks, and the east room, E, with 81 
desks. On the third floor all the partitions which had sub- 
divided it into seminary rooms were taken out and two 
large lecture rooms were made exactly the size of those 
on the second floor, one of these rooms, H, being seated 
with 169 desks and the other, K, with 81 desks. The for- 
mer professors' consultation room was converted again 
into a lecture room, L, and seated for 25 students. In the 
south wing the historical and political science seminary on 
the third floor is now used for office records and files. Tay- 
lor Hall now contains the following lecture rooms : A, 37 
seats; B, 25 seats; C, 40 seats; D, 85 seats; E, 81 seats; 
F, 169 seats; G, 81 seats; H, 169 seats; K, 81 seats; L, 25 
seats ; whereas during the time it was used for the library it 
contained only 5 lecture rooms and 3 small seminary rooms. 

Important improvements were made in Merion Hall, 
the oldest college hall of residence. The suite next to 
the drawing room on the first floor was changed into a 
students' sitting room. The warden's bedroom on the second 
floor and the bedroom adjoining were made into a large dou- 
ble suite, and a bedroom and private bathroom for the 
warden were made from the adjoining bedroom and sitting 
room. The former students' sitting room was changed into 



34 

a double suite for two students, and the room above it, which 
had been used for two students without being subdivided, was 
subdivided and made into a double suite. The serving 
pantry was greatly enlarged, and the direct heating, which 
had given constant trouble in Merion from pounding in the 
pipes was changed to indirect and eleven rooms were put 
under thermostatic control. The plumbing throughout the 
hall was completely renewed. These changes cost $4,180.48, 
which, by vote of the Directors, will be paid for from the 
increased annual rental of the double suites. 

During the year a new professor's house, Dolwen, was 
built for Professor Arthur Leslie Wheeler, on College Hill 
next to Tan-y-Bryn, at a total cost of $9,000, which sum 
the Alumnse Association of the college loaned to the trustees 
at 4% per cent interest from the endowment fund which they 
are raising for the college. 

Certain changes were made in flat A of Yarrow East in 
order to give more rooms and a comfortable dining room. 

The Athletic Association raised the sum of $41.74 
to complete the upper hockey field and 325 to concrete the 
lower athletic field so as to be able to play later in the season 
and in wet weather. This work was done during the summer. 

The College undertook the management of the skating 
pond. Four electric arc lamps were erected. The pond was 
surrounded by a wire netting. A gate house was built and a 
gatekeeper employed. Tickets were sold for one dollar to 
members of the college and two dollars to school girls in the 
neighborhood. Men, except members of the faculty, were 
excluded from the pond. It is hoped that the skating pond 
will soon meet the expenses of maintenance. 

The Board of Managers of Low Buildings, with the 
approval of the Low Buildings Association, made extensive 
alterations in Low" Buildings during the summer and autumn 
of 1906 at a cost of $1,706.92. The Association borrowed 
$1,000 to meet these expenses, which amount, together 
with the $706.92 additional cost, has been since repaid 
out of income. The former kitchen was divided across the 
middle, and the half nearer the coffee room was turned into 
a pantry, as the former pantry was entirely inadequate. The 



35 

range was moved to the other side of the kitchen and an ex- 
tension was built into the yard, enlarging the kitchen and 
making in addition a servants' dining room, a storeroom, and 
a refrigerator room ; a bedroom and bathroom for the men 
servants and a laundry were built in the basement; the dis- 
used kitchen, servants' room and pantry of the first floor 
apartment in the west wing were converted into a bedroom 
and office for an assistant housekeeper ; the servants' entrance 
was made available for trunks, all trunks having hitherto 
been brought in through the main front entrance; a door 
was cut into the hall so that it would no longer be necessary 
for servants to go through the coffee room in order to answer 
the door-bell; the porches, which had begun to rot, were re- 
built and repaired at a cost of $42.50; and certain defects in 
the working of the heating system, including the installa- 
tion of a fresh air duct, were remedied at a cost of $53.50. 
An extension to the northeast wing was begun in May, 1906, 
and completed and occupied by October 8, 1906. This ex- 
tension consists of a housekeeping apartment of five rooms on 
two floors, a kitchen, a servant's room, a bathroom, and two 
porches; and on the third floor a sitting room and two bed- 
rooms with private porch. The apartment is now occupied 
by Professor and Mrs. J. Edmund Wright, and the suite by 
a former student and her mother. This extension cost $3,385, 
the money for which was loaned to Low Building Association 
by Dr. Isabel Maddison and Mrs. J\ Edmund Wright. 

Our experience during the past two years has proved to 
the administration of the college, the two physicians in at- 
tendance, and the wardens that a new infirmary is almost a 
necessity. The special attention of the Directors is called to 
the reports of the Attending Physician and the Visiting Phy- 
sician of the College, which emphasise the very unsatisfac- 
tory conditions under which students who are ill must be 
cared for. 

An extension to the gymnasium is equally needed, 
and an effort should be made to enlarge it as soon as possible. 
The area of working floor space is only 1,716 square feet. 
From forty to sixty students are required to use this floor 
space at one time. The dressing room space is entirely inade- 



36 

quate, about one and one-half square feet being allowed to 
each student. From sixty to ninety students use at the same 
time for egress and ingress a small hallway twelve feet five 
inches by fourteen feet ten inches, which also contains a tele- 
phone booth, table, chair, water cooler, and a large cloak 
rack. The skirts and coats of forty students are often thrown 
in heaps on the floor because there is barely rack room for 
twenty students. The cramped conditions have become almost 
intolerable. Private dressing rooms for physical appoint- 
ments and an enlarged and ventilated measuring room are 
sorely needed. There are practically no bathing facilities. 
The four shower baths are used in connection with the swim- 
ming pool only. 

In connection with gifts made to the library and other 
gifts which have been generously offered to the college by dif- 
ferent classes, the Board of Directors passed the following 
important resolution on April 19, 1907 : "In view of the im- 
portance of architectural and artistic unity, all gifts affecting 
the architectural appearance of college buildings and grounds, 
or the inside decorations of academic buildings, should be de- 
signed under the direction of the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds for the approval of intending donors." 

The Directors invited the Friends' Summer School of 
Religious History to meet at the college from June 14th to 
June 22nd, 1907. The school met in Taylor Hall and the 
library, and Pembroke East and West were kept open for 
those who wished to reside on the campus. Miss Martha G. 
Thomas and Miss Patterson, the warden and housekeeper of 
Pembroke, presided over and managed the hall. The Stu- 
dents' Christian Union also held a conference at the same 
time in connection with the Friends' Summer School of Re- 
ligious History, and the Directors granted permission to the 
members to reside in Radnor Hall. Miss Virginia Stoddard 
and Mrs. Miller, the warden and housekeeper of Radnor, 
presided over and managed the hall. Our thanks are due to 
the two wardens and the two housekeepers, who generously 
gave up part of their summer vacation to act as hostesses on 
behalf of the college. 



37 

The Colonial Dames met on May 3, 1907, in the cloister 
of the library to dedicate a tablet to commemorate Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Duane Gillespie in whose honor they had founded a 
scholarship at Bryn Mawr College. 

The annual conferring of degrees took place on June 
6th, the address being delivered by His Excellency the British 
Ambassador, the Eight Honorable James Bryce, on "Has the 
Education of Women Distinctive Aims ?" Seventy-one stu- 
dents received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Eight students 
received the degree of Master of Arts ; one having received the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts of Bryn Mawr College in 1893, 
one in 1902, three in 1905, and three in 1906. One student 
was recommended for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

The Alumnse Association of Bryn Mawr held its annual 
meeting at the college in Eebruary. After the meeting the 
Alumnae Association lunched at the Deanery on the invita- 
tion of the President of the College to meet the Academic 
Committee. 

The attention of the Directors is especially called to the 
full information in regard to the working of the college dur- 
ing the past year given in the appendices to this report. The 
appendices contain the list of reappointments and changes in 
the instructors and officers for the year 1907-08 ; a list of 
the fellowships and scholarships awarded for the year 1907- 
08 ; the names of candidates receiving degrees during the 
year ; a list of the speakers who have addressed the college ; a 
list of the college preachers during the year ; the gifts made 
to the college during the year ; the titles of the scientific pub- 
lications of the faculty during the year; a tabular summary 
of the courses of instruction; and reports made to the 
President of the College by the Assistant to the President, 
the Librarian, the Directors of Athletics and Gymnastics, the 
Attending Physician of the college, and the Visiting Phy- 
sician of the college. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. Caret Thomas. 
December 20, 1907. 



38- 

Report of the Assistant to the President. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to submit to you a statistical report on 
the students of Bryn Mawr College for the academic year 
1906-07, and also an account of the regulations of the Direc- 
tors and Faculty which were administered through my office. 

The entire number of students enrolled during the year 
was 437. There were seventy-five graduate students, includ- 
ing fellows. The number of graduates was over 17 per cent 
of the whole number of students. 

/. Comparative Table of Number of Graduate and Under- 
graduate Students from 1885 to 1907. 

v Graduate Undergraduate Total 

xear. Students. Students. Number. 

1885-86 8 36 44 

1886-87 10 54 64 

1887-88 8 70 78 

1888-89 16 100 116 

1889-90 22 100 122 

1890-91 12 120 132 

1891-92 27 142 169 

1892-93 34 168 202 

1893-94 .43 200 243 

1894-95 49 234 283 

1895-96 52 246 298 

1896-97 46 243 289 

1897-98 49 275 324 

1898-99 67 287 354 

1899-1900 53 334 387 

1900-01 48 348 396 

1901-02 53 383 436 

1902-03 70 377 447 

1903-04 62 384 446 

1904-05 63 378 441 

1905-06 79 377 456 

1906-07 75 362 437 



39 

Statistics of Graduate Students. 
II. Geographical Distribution of Graduate Students. 

The seventy-five graduate students enrolled during the 
year came from the following states and countries: 

Pennsylvania . . 25 Alabama 1 

New York 7 District of Columbia .... 1 

Indiana 4 Illinois 1 

Maryland 4 Maine 1 

Ohio 4 Mississippi 

Kansas . 3 

Massachusetts 3 



1 
Missouri . 1 

]STew Hampshire . 1 

ISTew Jersey 1 

Connecticut 2 g(mth Dakota 1 

Towa • • ' • • 2 England 1 

Kentucky 2 Germany 1 

North Carolina 2 Canada 2 

Rhode Island 2 — 

Wisconsin 2 75 

These seventy-five graduate students may be classified 
as follows : three non-resident, holding European fellowships, 
(two studying abroad, while one has deferred the holding of 
the fellowship) ; one, holding a European fellowship studying 
at Bryn Mawr College and counted as a graduate scholar; 
ten holding resident fellowships ; twenty-four holding grad- 
uate scholarships ; eight members of the college staff, and 
thirty-one graduate students holding no official appointment 
from the college. Eifty were resident and twenty-five non- 
resident. 

III. Number of Years of Graduate Study. 
31 in their first year of graduate study. 

13 in their second year of graduate study. 

14 in their third year of graduate study 
3 in their fourth year of graduate study. 
6 in their fifth year of graduate study. 

3 in their sixth year of graduate study. 

4 in their seventh year of graduate study. 
1 in her ninth year of graduate study. 

75 



40 
TV. Studies Elected by 72 Graduate Students in Residence. 

Under each subject all the graduate students electing 
work in that subject are included. 

Students. Percentage. 

English 20 27.7 

Latin 16 22.2 

French 11 15.3 

Greek 11 15.3 

History 9 12.5 

German and Teutonic Philology. . . 8 11.1 

Mathematics 8 11.1 

Physics 8 11.1 

Archaeology 6 8.3 

Italian and Spanish 6 8.3 

Philosophy 6 8.3 

Semitic Languages and Biblical 

Literature 8 8.3 

Chemistry 5 6.9 

Biology 4 5.6 

Education 2 2.8 

Economics and Politics 2 2.8 

Sanskrit 2 2.8 

Geology 1 1.4 

Statistics of Undergraduate Students. 
V. Geographical Distribution of Undergraduate Students. 

The 362 undergraduate students enrolled during the 
past year came from the following states and countries 

Students 

Pennsylvania . . . .132 

New York 63 

Illinois 28 

Massachusetts .... 24 

New Jersey 18 

Maryland 14 

Ohio 14 

Connecticut 5 



Per cent 




Students ] 


3 er cent 


36.4 




5 


1.3 


17.4 




5 


1.3 


7.6 


Virginia . . . 


5 


1.3 


6.6 


Minnesota . 


4 


1.1 


4.9 


Nebraska . . 


4 


1.1 


3.8 


California . 


3 


.8 


3.8 






.8 


1.3 




3 


.8 



Per 
cent 




Students 


Per 

cent 


.8 


Florida . . 


1 


.2 




Kentucky . 


1 


.2 


.8 


Mississippi 


1 


.2 


.8 


New Hamps 


mire. . 1 


.2 


.5 


Oregon . . . 


1 


.2 


.5 




1 


.2 


.5 




2 


.5 


.5 




1 


.2 


.5 


Germany . 


1 


.2 


.5 




■ 




.2 


Total . . 


362 





A\ 



Students 

Rhode Island .... 3 
District of Colum- 
bia 3 

Wisconsin 3 

Arkansas 2 

South Carolina . . 2 

Colorado 2 

Iowa 2 

Kansas 2 

Texas 2 

Delaware . 1 

These 362 undergraduates may be classified as follows: 
314 resident, 48 non-resident, 356 candidates for a degree, 6 
hearers. 

Of the 356 candidates for a degree 72 were Seniors and 
68 of these received their degree in June ; 92 were Juniors ; 
96 were Sophomores, and 96 were Freshmen. 

In addition to those who graduated 47 undergraduates 
left during the year, or at its close, for the following reasons : 

On account of ill health 10 

To go to another college 1 

On account of ill health and unsatisfactory 

work 3 

Heavily conditioned (three of these were 

required to leave) V 

Needed by family 11 

For financial reasons 1 

Married 1 

To travel abroad 1 

To study music 1 

On account of death of parents 2 

Excluded from degree 1 

Asked to leave on account of unsatisfactory 

conduct 1 

Work for degree could be completed with- 
out attendance 3 

Reasons not stated 4 

Total 4? 



42 

The students "who left were from the following classes: 
Seniors, 3 ; Juniors, 11 ; Sophomores, 17 ; Freshmen, 16. 

Statistics of Graduate and Undergraduate Students. 

The distribution of the 434 graduate and undergraduate 
students in residence among the several departments is given 
in Appendix IX. 

VI. Denominational Affiliations of Graduate and Under- 
graduate Students. 

Affiliations. Graduate. Undergraduate. Total. 

Episcopal 21 129 150 

Presbyterian 10 80 90 

Unitarian 3 28 31 

Congregational 12 15 27 

Methodist Episcopal 8 14 22 

Friends 5 15 20 

Jewish 2 18 20 

Baptist 4 15 19 

Eoman Catholic 12 12 

Lutheran 3 7 10 

Universalist 9 9 

Christian Science 3 3 

Dutch Eeformed 3 3 

Moravian 2 1 3 

Protestant Reformed ... 2 1 3 

Church of Christ 3 3 

United Brethren 1 1 

Union Evangelical 1 1 

None 10 10 

75 362 437 

Statistics of Senior Class. 

At Commencement, June, 1907, the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts was conferred on 71 students, five of whom completed 



43 



the requirements in February, 1907. 
analysed as follows : 



Their courses may be 



VII. Length of Course of Senior Class. 



Number of 
Students. 


Years Spent 
on Course. 


Entered. 


Semesters absent 
from College. 


63 


4 


October, 1903 


None 


1 


3% 


October, 1902 


2 


1 


4 


October, 1902 


1 


1 


4 


October, 1901 


4 


1 


4 


October, 1902 


2 


2 


4% 


October, 1902 


JSTone 


2 


3 


October, 1904 


ISTone 



71 

119 students entered the college as freshmen in October, 
1903. Of these 63, or 52.9 per cent, ^graduated after the 
regular four-year course. 

The average age of the class graduating in June was 22 
years and 7. 6 months ; of the class graduating in February, 
24 years and 4 months. 

The median age of the class graduating in June was 22 
years and 8 months ; of the class graduating in February, 24 
years and 3 months. 



VIII. Groups Ele< 

English and French 

Latin and French 

English and Philosophy . . 
History and Economics 

and Politics 

Chemistry and Biology. . . 
Latin and Mathematics . . . 

German and French 

Latin and English 

Economics and Politics and 

Philosophy 

Greek and Latin 

English and German .... 



cted hy the Senior Class. 

8 Latin and German 3 

8 Mathematics and Physics. 2 
7 Greek and Mathematics ... 1 

Latin and Italian and 

7 Spanish 1 

6 French and Italian and 

5 Spanish 1 

5 History, Law and Econom- 
4 ics and Politics 1 

Philosophy and Physics. . 1 
4 Mathematics and Chemis- 
3 try 1 



71 



44 

Statistics of Freshman Class. 

■ The Freshman class numbered 94, all entering in Oc- 
tober. Eighty-seven were resident and seven non-resident. 

IX. Table of Conditions of Freshman Class. 

Clear 19 

Clear except punctuation or spelling 27 

1/2 condition 6 

1 condition 11 

11/2 conditions 4 

2 conditions . . . 4 

21/2 conditions 3 

3 conditions 7 

31/2 conditions 1 

4 conditions 2 

5 conditions 2 

Honorable dismissal from other colleges. . 8 

Total 94 

Freshmen entering the college without conditions, 22.09 
per cent; entering with conditions in punctuation and spell- 
ing, 31.4 per cent, or 53.49 per cent entering with no condi- 
tions except punctuation and spelling; Freshmen conditioned 
in punctuation, 42 ; conditioned in spelling, 13. 

Since this was the first class to enter under the new 
regulations the percentage of those entering with no condi- 
tions was noticeably high. 

X. Comparative Table of Percentage of Freshmen Entering 

Without Matriculation Conditions, October, 

1890— October, 1906. 

This table includes only those entering in October of 
each year and takes no account of conditions in punctuation 
and spelling. Up to 1897 the proportion of students enter- 



45 

ing free from conditions to all the entering students, includ- 
ing honorable dismissal students, was taken. After 1897 the 
students who entered on honorable dismissal were not counted 
in taking the percentage. It is therefore misleading to com- 
pare the two sets of percentages. 

In 1890 25.0% In 1898 26.9 % 

In 1891 22.8% In 1899 31.73% 

In 1892 32.0% In 1900 38 ' Y8 % 

ln 1893 26 - 17 ° In 1902 37.97% 

1111894 19 - 3 ^ In 1903 35.29% 

In 1895 19 -°% In 1901 50.00% 

In 1896 21.8% In 1905 51.81% 

In 1897 31.8% In 1906 53.18% 

XI. Table of Preparatory Schools that Prepared 86 
Freshmen. 

(Arranged according to sections of country in which the 
college offers matriculation scholarships. Eight Freshmen 
entered by honorable dismissal from other colleges.) 

New England States: 

Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn 3 

Miss Winsor's School, Boston, Mass 3 

Miss Ingol's School, Cambridge, Mass 2 

The B. M. C. Durfee High School, Fall River, Mass. 1 

The Hingham High School, Hingham, Mass 1 

Milton Academy, Milton, Mass 1 

Miss Wheeler's School, Providence, R. 1 1 

12 

1st Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of Miss 
Haskell's School, Boston, Mass. (This student deferrred en- 
tering the college, so her school is not included in the above 
list.) 



46 

2nd Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of Miss 
Winsor's School, Boston, Mass. (This student also deferred 
entering the college.) 

New York, New Jersey, and Delaware: 

Brearley School, New York City 6 

The Balliol School, Utica, N. Y 5 

Miss Spence's School, New York City 3 

The Asbury Park High School, Asbury Park, N. J. . 1 

The Dearborn-Morgan School, Orange, N. J 1 

The Hornellsville High School, Hornellsville, N. Y. . 1 

The Ogdensburg Free Academy, Ogdensburg, 1ST. Y. . 1 

The Fenimore Cooper School, Albany, N. Y 1 

The Ossining School, Ossining, N. Y 1 

The Princeton School, Princeton, N. J 1 

The Veltin School, New York City 1 

22 

1st and 2nd Matriculation Scholarships won by pupils 
of Brearley School, New York City. 

Pennsylvania and Southern States: 

The High School for Girls, Philadelphia, Penna. . . 11 

The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Penna 9 

The Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Penna. . 6 

The Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Penna. . 3 

The Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md 3 

The Misses Kirk's School, Rosemont, Penna 3 

The Friends' School, Washington, D. C 2 

The High School, Norristown, Penna 1 

The Calhoun-Chamberlain School, Montgomery, Ala. 1 
Miss Edith Child's Preparatory Classes, Philadel- 
phia, Penna 1 

Ivy House School for Girls, Germantown, Phila- 
delphia, Penna 1 

The Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, Penna 1 

Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh, Penna 1 



47 

Miss Hills's School for Girls, Philadelphia, Penna . . 1 

Miss Keyser's School, Philadelphia, Penna 1 

The Memminger JSTormal School, Charleston, S. C. . . 1 
Pennsylvania College for Women, Preparatory De- 
partment 1 

The High School, Pittsburgh, Penna 1 

Miss Sayward's School, Overbrook, Penna 1 

The High School, Radnor, Penna 1 

The Misses Sergeant and Miss Bent's School, Har- 

risbnrg, Penna 1 

The Southern Female College, Petersburg, Va 1 

Miss Stahr's School, Lancaster, Penna 1 

Swarthmore Preparatory School, Swarthmore, 

Penna 1 

The Collegiate School for Girls, Philadelphia, 

Penna 1 

St. Timothy's School, Catonsville, Md 1 

The High School, Kensington, London, England. . . 1 

57 

The 1st and 2nd Matriculation Scholarships were won 
by two pupils of the Girls' High School, Philadelphia, whose 
averages were exactly even, one-half the total value of the 
two scholarships being given to each candidate. 

Western States: 

The Bartholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati, 2 

Ascham Hall, Chicago, 111 1 

The High School, Sioux City, la 1 

Miss Butler's School for Girls, Cincinnati, 1 

The Girton School, Winnetka, 111 1 

The Oak Place School, Akron, O 1 

Mr. Powell's School, Grand Rapids, Mich 1 

The University School for Girls, Chicago, 111 1 

Miss Houghteling's School, Chicago, 111 1 

Miss Loring's School, Chicago, 111 1 

11 



48 

1st Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of Bartholo- 
mew-Clifton School, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

2nd Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of Miss 
Lor rag's School, Chicago, 111. 

Private tuition 22 

Honorable dismissal from other colleges 8 

Total 132 

In the above list duplicates are included, some students 
having received their preparation at two or more schools, and 
also by private tuition. 

XII. Preparation Received in Private or Public Schools. 

Private Schools 44 

Private Schools and Private Tuition 17 

Public Schools 16 

Private and Public Schools 4 

Public Schools and Private Tuition 2 

Public Schools, Private Schools and Private Tuition. . 3 

Honorable Dismissal 8 



94 



Percentage of Freshmen entering by examination in Oc- 
tober who have received preparation for college only in pri- 
vate schools or by private tuition equals 70.93 per cent; the 
percentage of those who studied only in public schools was 
18.6. 

XIII. Geographical Distribution of Freshman Class. 

Pennsylvania 31 New Jersey 4 

New York 17 Maryland 3 

Illinois 10 Michigan 2 

Massachusetts 7 Nebraska 2 

Ohio 5 District of Columbia. ... 2 



49 



Connecticut 


1 

1 


Virginia 


, . . . 1 
1 


Indiana 


1 


1 


Iowa 


1 


1 




1 
1 




1 



94 



XIV. Denominational Affiliations of the Freshman Class. 



Episcopal 33 

Presbyterian 24 

Unitarian 8 

Jewish 8 

Methodist Episcopal .... 5 

Baptist 3 

Congregational 2 

Dutch Reformed 2 



Eriends 2 

Roman Catholic 2 

Union Evangelical 1 

Universalist 1 

'No church affiliation .... 3 

94 



XV. Occupations of Parents of the Freshman Class. 



Physicians 11 

Lawyers 9 

Merchants, wholesale ... 8 

Manufacturers 7 

Merchants, retail 5 

Professors 5 

Officers of Companies: 

Agents 4 

Managers 3 

Presidents 2 

Secretaries 2 

Treasurers 2 

Engineers 3 

Importers 3 

Bankers 2 

Clergymen 2 

Journalists 2 



Ko occupation 3 

Architect 1 

Bank clerk 1 

Carriage builder 1 

Earmer 1 

Government service (Pen- 
sion Office) 1 

Geologist 1 

Inventor 1 

Proprietor of theatre ... 1 

Real estate agent 1 

Salesman 1 

Stockbroker 1 

Teacher 1 

Total 85 

Deceased 9 



50 
XVI. Average and Median Age of the Freshman Class. 

Years. Months. 

Average age 18 9 

Median age 18 6 

Average age (excluding honorable dismissal stu- 
dents), 18 9 

Median age (excluding honorable dismissal stu- 
dents) '. . . 18 6 

XVII. Groups Registered by Freshmen on Entering College. 

Greek and Latin 5 German and French 3 

Greek and English 1 History and Economics and 

Latin and English 1 Politics 1 

Latin and German 3 Mathematics and Physics. 1 

English and German .... 2 Chemistry and Biology. . . 3 

English and French 2 — 

English and Philosophy. . 1 23 

24.5 per cent of the freshman class registered groups on 
entering the college. 

Statistics of the Merit Law. 

From June, 1902, till June, 1907, eighteen students have 
been excluded from their degrees under the Merit Law, but 
two of these students remained at college without definitely 
working for a degree. Several students with low grades have 
left the college without graduating. 

The rule regulating the work of members of the junior 
class who had as many as half their hours below merit came 
into operation for the class of 1907, and at the end of the 
year, 1905-06, nine students were placed on probation and 
two students were cautioned. One of the nine students placed 
on probation left the college and the remaining eight, now 
counted in the class of 1908, were under the care of the Peti- 
tion Committee during the year, 1906-07. Of these, six 
did satisfactory work during the first semester and two made 



51 

an unsatisfactory record in the mid-year examinations. Of 
these two, one did not wish to return to the college or to take a 
degree, and the other, partly on account of ill health, decided 
to leave college at the end of the year. The students who 
were cautioned improved the quality of their work and grad- 
uated in 1907. After the mid-year examinations one addi- 
tional student was placed on probation. 

After the final examinations in May, 1907, only two 
students fell under the operation of the rule as compared with 
nine in May, 1906. One of these had planned to stay only 
three years in the college, the other is continuing to work for 
her degree in the class of 1909. Four of the nine above men- 
tioned students left in June, 1907, without graduating, one 
being excluded from a degree by the Merit Law. Hence the 
Petition Committee will have under its care in 1907-08 six 
students, four in the class of 1908, and two in the class of 
1909. 

Registration of Attendance on the First Day of Each 
Semester and Before and After Vacations. 

Students are required to register eight times in the 
college year. 

Table of Cases of Failure to Register. 



Excused 

Region Re tf e r r f0r 
on account of 

reasons. 



Failed to 

igister 
other 

illness 

Beginning of the college year 3 3 

Before the Thanksgiving vacation. ... 7 4 

After the Thanksgiving vacation .... 5 3 

Before the Christmas vacation 10 1 

After the Christmas vacation 18 9 

Beginning of the second semester 14 4 

Before the Easter vacation 7 3 

After the Easter vacation 17 4 

Total 81 31 



52 

Registration of Attendance at Lectures. 

The attendance of each student at her lectures was reg- 
istered throughout the year in the same way as in the year, 
1905-06. After the students had registered the courses they 
expected to attend, mimeographed cards were sent out to 
all professors each week giving in alphabetical order the 
names of the students in their classes. The instructor marked 
on the cards the absences of the students at each lecture dur- 
ing the week and returned the cards at the end of the week to 
the office. The absences were then transferred to special cards 
for each student so that for each student a card was prepared 
showing the day and hour of each absence and noting excuses 
on account of illness or for other reasons. In seven classes 
of over fifty students student monitors were appointed to 
mark the absences. In all nearly 5,000 cards were sent out 
and tabulated in the course of the year. The cards were re- 
ferred to constantly by the office and by members of the 
faculty, and students whose attendance was irregular were 
cautioned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Isabel Maddison, 
Assistant to the President. 



53 



Report of the Head Librarian. 
To the President: Madam, 

As head librarian of Bryn Mawr College, I have the 
honor to present to yon the following report on the work of 
the Library for the year October 1, 1906, to September 30, 
1907: 

Accessions. 

Total number of volumes accessioned from the open- 
ing of the library to September 30, 1907 54,568 

Total number of volumes withdrawn up to September 

30, 1907 1,709 

Actual number of volumes in library September 30, 

1907 52,859 

In addition to this total of accessioned volumes the 
library possesses a collection of books on comparative reli- 
gion presented by Mr. Albert J. Edmunds of Philadelphia, 
which has not yet been accessioned or counted. This collec- 
tion is estimated at about 200 volumes. The total number of 
volumes belonging to the library is therefore about 200 more 
than the recorded accessions. 

During the year 3,497 volumes, exclusive of Mr. Ed- 
munds' gift, were added to the library. 

The accession statistics (exclusive of Mr. Edmunds' 
gift) for the year, 1906-07, are as follows ; 

By purchase 1,515 

By binding 541 

By exchange 10 

By gift 1,179 

Replaced 10 

Christian Union Library 242 

Total 3,497 



54 



These accessions are divided by classes as follows: 

General works 167 volumes 

Philosophy 600 

Eeligion 386 

Sociology 251 

Philology 109 

Science 542 

Useful Arts 42 

Fine arts 62 

Literature 933 

History 400 

Not classed 5 



Total 3,497 " 

Gifts. 

During the year 1,179* volumes and 300* pamphlets 
were presented to the library. A detailed list of donors is 
appended to this report. The most important gifts of the 
year were (1) the David Irons Memorial Library of 541 
volumes, presented by the Undergraduate Association and the 
Graduate Club, and (2) the private library of Mr. Albert 
J. Edmunds of Philadelphia, presented to the college by Mr. 
Edmunds. To the first gift no conditions are attached. It 
consist of complete collections of the great philosophers, works 
on ethics, and some seventeenth and eighteenth century 
books, and one Elzevir. To the second gift is attached the 
condition that it shall be kept together until after Mr. Ed- 
munds' death and shall then be catalogued and arranged 
under subjects. On account of this condition, the books of 
this collection have not been accessioned or catalogued, but 
have been shelved, without cataloguing, in the Semitic Semi- 
nary. 

Loan Collection on Burgundian History. 

Although not a gift, the collection of books on Burgun- 
dian history from the library of their father, the late Charles 



♦This is exclusive of Mr. Edmunds' gift, which is not yet counted. 



55 

Foster Kirk, lent by the Misses Kirk should be mentioned 
here. This collection, the property of the Misses Kirk of 
Bryn Mawr, was deposited with the library in October, 1906, 
to be nsed, if desired, by advanced students of history. 

Cataloguing. 

The cataloguing statistics of the year are : 

Books catalogued 3,561 

Cards written 10,300 

Seminary cards 66 

New volumes of periodicals, continua- 
tions, etc., entered . 1,047 

Miss Edna Lucy Goss was appointed special cataloguer 
for ten months, beginning October 1, 1906, to work under 
Miss Sears' supervision on the change of the catalogue to 
dictionary form. During this time she recatalogued all the 
class of history, including travel, biography, and archaeology, 
except a few sets of periodicals which were left as not needing 
recataloguing immediately. In addition she began to recata- 
logue the class of sociology. Some recataloguing was also 
done in the classes of French and German literature. 

In addition to the cataloguing of the regular accessions 
of the year, the Mary E. Stevens Memorial Library, which 
was presented to the college in 1905-06, has been completely 
catalogued. Part of this cataloguing was done by the regular 
staff previous to October, 1906, and the work has been com- 
pleted this year by Miss Bessie H. Jennings who, in March, 
1907, was appointed as an extra assistant on part time. 

A brief summary of the progress of the dictionary cata- 
logue and the revision of the catalogue, from June, 1904, 
the date when the work was begun, to September, 1907, is 
herewith presented. 

Classes of books which have been recatalogued and have 
now full dictionary cataloguing : 

1. All books dealing with literature in general. 

2. All books in the class of American literature. 



56 

3. All books in the class of English literature. 

4. All books in the class of Anglo-Saxon literature. 

5. All histories of German literature. 

6. All books in the class of Italian literature. 

7. All books in the class of Spanish literature. 

8. All books in the class of Russian literature. 

9. All books in the class of Chinese and Japanese and 
other minor literatures. 

10. The greater part of the collection of Sanskrit litera- 
ture. 

11. All books in the class of History. 

12. All books in the class of Archseology. 

13. All books in the class of Travel and Geography. 

14. All books in the class of Biography. 

15. A small part of the class of Sociology. 

In the above classes all books have been revised and re- 
catalogued except certain sets of society and periodical pub- 
lications which do not need immediate recataloguing. In ad- 
dition to this work of revision, all new accessions since June, 
1904, have been given full dictionary cataloguing. 

Special Funds. 

Few special funds were donated during the year 1906-07. 
The following special funds were expended: 

Sale of books and fines $269.00 

Hall Department Library fund 132.25 

Special fund from Class of 1902 (income) 25.00 

For Semitic languages (gift of Mr. David Scull, Mr. 

Justus C. Strawbridge, Mr. Asa Wing and others). 500.00 

In addition to the above funds, which were entirely 
library funds, a special gift of $500 was made by Miss Gar- 
rett for the equipment of the art department, including the 
purchase of books. As the greater part of this gift was used 
by Dr. Ransom for equipment other than books, it is not 
counted as a library fund. Of the total amount of $500, 
only $92.27 was spent on art books for the library. 



57 

Inventory. 

The regular biennial inventory was taken in the sum 
mer of 1907. By September 30th all classes of the books 
had been checked over once, but the final hunting down of 
books listed during the inventory as missing had not been 
finished at this date. On September 30, 134 volumes were 
listed as missing, but this number will undoubtedly be greatly 
diminished when the final checking is finished. This pre- 
liminary list of missing books is divided by subjects as fol- 
lows: 

General works 6 volumes 

Philosophy 2 " 

Sociology 8 " 

Philology 8 " 

Science (principally books in Dalton Hall) 25 " 

Useful arts 6 " 

Literature (all languages) 67 " 

History, Biography, Travel, Archgeology 12 " 

!N"o books were missing from the two classes of religion 
and fine arts. The list of books missing in Dalton Hall is 
large on account of the difficulty of taking an inventory of 
the geological library. In this library it was impossible to 
take an accurate inventory owing to the crowded condition 
of the room, and books had to be listed as missing here, which 
will probably be found when the request of the librarian for 
more room for this collection can be complied with. 

Circulation. 

In October, 1906, the new rules of the Library Com- 
mittee placing a time limit on the books drawn out by stu- 
dents went into effect. At the same time a very marked 
increase in circulation was noticeable. It is impossible to 
give the exact increase, as no detailed statistics of circula- 
tion had been kept while the library was in Taylor Hall. 
When the present librarian first took charge, Miss Lord, the 
retiring librarian, stated to her that no circulation statistics 



58 

had ever been kept because the circulation was too small to 
make it worth while. 

Although the circulation increased each year, this con- 
tinued to be the case while the library remained in Taylor 
Hall. As has been stated, no exact statistics of circulation 
for previous years are available, but from what data we have, 
the circulation was estimated as averaging from 500 to 600 
volumes a month. 

Beginning October, 1906, exact statistics of circulation 
during the college year were kept. These statistics are as 
follows : 

Circulation Statistics from October, 1906, to May, 1907. 

October, 1906 1,865 volumes 

November 1,575 " 

December 1-18 (18 days only) 1,074 " 

January, 1907 1,660 " 

February 2,614 " 

March 1,852 " 

April 1,810 

May 1,527 

Total for 8 months 13,977 " 

This increase in circulation is in reality more striking 
than the figures indicate, as in 1906-07 periodicals and 
seminary books which had been previously circulated freely 
were for the first time restricted. 

The very large increase in circulation shown above is 
attributed to two causes : 

1. The greater accessibility of books due to their ar- 
rangement in order in the new building, and 

2. The new rule of the Library Committee placing a 
time limit on books drawn out by students. 

The first of the causes stated above needs no explanation. 
Of the second, it may be said that the operation of the new 
rule has been such that a book, which under the old rules of 



59 

the library might be taken out in October and not returned 
until the following May, unless specifically recalled, thus 
being useless to the college during this time, is by operation 
of the new rule returned to the library in two or four weeks, 
appears again on the shelves and is available for use by other 
members of the college. The following table shows the com- 
parative use of certain books selected at random, during the 
two years 1905-06 and 1906-07. 

List of Boohs in General Literature, Selected at Random 

from the Shelves, Showing Comparative Circulation 

in 1905-06 and 1906-07. 

Author and Title Number of times circulated in 

1905-06 1906-07 

Arnold, Essays in Criticism, 1st series 14 37 

Arnold, Poems 6 10 

Paul, Life of Matthew Arnold 2 4 

Browning, Robert, Poetical Works 5 9 

Byron, Poetical Works 6 60 

Collingwood, Life of Euskin 2 9 

Courthope, History of English Poetry 5 15 

De Quincey, Works 5 64 

Harrison, Life and Letters of Poe 2 6 

Herrick, Poems 1 4 

Keats, Poems 20 20 

Knapp, Life and Writings of George Borrow . . 1 4 

Lanier, Sidney, Poems 1 4 

Rossetti, D. G., Poems 13 14 

Shelley, Poems 11 33 

Stevenson, Virginibus Puerisque 3 10 

Stevenson, Men and Books 3 5 

Spencer, Herbert, Autobiography 1 5 

Watson, William, Poems 7 10 

Woodberry, G. E., Nathaniel Hawthorne .... 1 4 

Pater, Marius the Epicurean 8 11 

Brooke, Stopf ord, Ten Plays of Shakespeare . . 2 5 

Andrews, C. M., History of England 3 9 



60 

Hours of Opening. 

From October, 1906, to June, 1907, the library was 
open from 8 a. m. to 10 p. m. on week-days, and from 2 to 
10 p. m. on Sundays, except during the Christmas vacation, 
when it was closed at 6 p. m. on week-days and all day on 
Sunday, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day. 

The library was also closed on Thanksgiving Day and 
for two days during the Easter recess, when the tiled floors 
were cleaned and oiled. During the hours when the library 
was open there was a library assistant in charge at the loan 
desk constantly from 8 a. m. to 10 p. m. From 8 a. m. to 
5 p. m. and from 6 to 7.15 p. m. a member of the library 
staff was in charge, while from 5 to 6 p. m. and 7.15 to 10 
p. m. a student assistant was in charge. On Sundays a mem- 
ber of the library staff was in charge from 2 to 6 p. m. and a 
student from 7 to 10 p. m. From 10 p. m. to 8 a. m. and 
on Sunday morning the stack was closed. 

In the reserve book room upstairs a member of the 
library staff was in charge from 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. Students 
were in charge from 7.15 to 10 p. m. From 6 until 7.15 
p. m. and on Sunday all day the reserve book room was closed. 
It will be readily seen therefore that long hours of opening 
have been covered at the two desks. 

Christian Union Library. 

In October the library of the Christian Union was in- 
stalled in the Christian Union reading room in the new 
library building. During the year this library has been 
administered by the regular library staff, the shelves and 
room kept in order, and books charged and discharged. In 
addition to the books which are kept here, books from the 
main library numbering several hundred have been sent to 
this room during the year and reserved here for use for Bible 
class work, etc. 

At the beginning of the year, the President of the Col- 
lege requested the librarian to take charge of the Christian 



61 

Union library and to record and catalogue it as a part of 
the college library, and likewise directed the librarian, as 
this was not work which could be done legitimately in col- 
lege time, to have it done in extra time by some member of 
the cataloguing department if possible, or some extra assistant 
from outside if necessary, the cost of the extra work to be 
paid by the Christian Union. It was finally arranged to 
have this work done by Miss Sears, who was paid by the 
Christian Union. The books of the Christian Union library 
were all carefully arranged, classified, and recorded in the 
library records and a separate catalogue for use in the Chris- 
tian Union reading room was also made. Printed labels to 
indicate that the books belonged to the Christian Union and 
were to be kept in the Christian Union room were placed on 
the books. 

New Library. 

When the college year opened in October, 1906, the 
books in the stack were all arranged and ready for use, the 
periodical reading room and the seminary rooms of the south 
wing were in order, but the reading room was not quite fin- 
ished and the whole of the north wing was unfinished. 
Within the first week the reading room was finished and in 
use. Temporary quarters were found for the five seminaries 
that were to have rooms in the north wing by using the 
philosophy seminary for both the philosophical and German 
seminaries, the Spanish-Italian seminary for the Spanish, 
Italian and Trench seminaries and by placing the Greek, 
Latin and English seminaries in the graduate lecture room 
on the second floor of the south wing. The professors who 
were to have offices in the unfinished north wing were allowed 
to use the study room for consultation and office pur- 
poses. In this way it was found possible to meet all needs 
without feeling any great inconvenience from the delay in 
completing the north wing. 

In February, 1907, the north wing was finished suffi- 
ciently to allow the librarian to move the five seminary libra- 
ries mentioned above to their respective seminaries and 



62 

the rooms were ready for use at the opening of the second 
semester. At the same time new shelving made in the col- 
lege, shops from plans and measurements furnished by the 
librarian was placed in the art seminary, and the building 
was practically completed except for certain details of furni- 
ture and equipment. 

Superintendence. 

During the first semester the janitorial force of the 
building had not been under the supervision of the librarian, 
but at the beginning of the second semester the President 
of the College requested the librarian to undertake the super- 
vision of this work, as it seemed easier to control it within 
the building than from outside. Miss Bessie H. Jennings 
was appointed general assistant, partly to help the librarian 
with the extra work entailed by this change, partly to cata- 
logue the Mary E. Stevens Memorial Library, only part of 
which had been catalogued up to this time. 

In the spring of 1907 the Librarian was granted leave of 
absence for one year for travel in Europe. At the same time 
Miss Minnie E. Sears resigned her position as head cata- 
loguer in order to travel and study abroad. Miss Mary L. 
Jones was appointed Acting Librarian for the college year 
1907-08. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ISADOEE G. MlTDGE, 

Head Librarian. 



63 



Gifts to Bryn Maivr College Library, 1906-07. 

Mr. Francis R. Abbott: Michael, Studies in Plant and Or- 
ganic Chemistry, and literary papers. 

Alabama Geological Survey : Smith, Underground Water Re- 
sources of Alabama. 

Alabama, University of : Celebration of the Seventy-fifth An- 
niversary, 1831-1906. 

Allegheny Carnegie Free Library: Annual Report, 16 and 17. 

American Academy of Political and Social Science: Hand- 
book. 

American Federation of Labor : Twelve pamphlets. 

American Marathi Mission: Report, 1906. 

American School for Oriental Study in Palestine: Paper 
No. 2. 

Mr. William C. Armstrong: Lord Sterling at the Telescope. 

Association of American Universities : Journal of Proceed- 
ings and Addresses", !Nos. 7 and 8. 

Association of Colleges and "Preparatory Schools of the Mid- 
dle States and Maryland: Proceedings, Vol. 19. 

Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the 
Southern States : Proceedings of the Twelfth An- 
nual Meeting. 

Association of Collegiate Alumnse: Publications, ISTos. 14 
and 15. 

Mr. William Stuart Auchincloss : Auchincloss, To Canaan in 
One Year. 
Christian Era. 
Bible Chronology. 
How to Read Josephus. 

Miss Margaret H. Ayer : Bowles, Poetical Works, 2 vols. 

Dr. W. W. Bailey : Bailey, Botanical Notebook. 

Professor George A. Barton: Babylonian Expedition of the 
University of Pennsylvania, Ser. A, Vol. 20, Pt. 1. 



G4 

Bodleian Library: Hunter, Choric Song from Tennyson's 

"Lotos-Eaters." 

., WOOCI, ALoyivrjS r) Tltpl TLapprjcnas. 

Scott, Death of Shelley. 

Sidgwick, Influence of Greek Philosophy on English 

Poetry. 
Staff-Kalendar, 1907. 
Percy, Privy Council under the Tudors. 
Mackie, Pope Adrian IV. 
Boston Museum of Fine Arts : Thirty-first Annual Report. 
Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences: Walter, Behavior 
of the Pond Snail. 
Science Bulletin, Vol. 1, Nos. 7 to 10. 
Brown University: Exercises Commemorating Restoration 
of University Hall. 
Contributions from the Anatomical Laboratory, Vol. 4. 
Historical Catalogue, 1764-1904. 
California, University of: Library Bulletin, ]STo. 15. 
Publications in Zoology, Vol. 3, ISTos. 5 to 13. 
Publications in Education, Vol. 5, JSTo. 1. 
Cambridge Public Library: Bibliography of T. W. Higgin- 

son. 
Canada Archivist's Office: Canadian Archives, 1905, 1-2. 
Canada Geological Survey: Annual Report, 1901, 1902, 
1903, and Maps. 
Summary Report, 1905 and 1906. 
Section of Mines, Annual Report, 1904. 
Brock, Report of Rossland Mining District. 
Low, Report of Chibougamau Mining Region. 
Sheets 59-65, 74-76, 82-83. 
Canada, Superintendent of Immigration : Canadian Year 

Book, 1906. 
Mr. Andrew Carnegie : Alexander, James Wilson, Patriot. 
Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: 

Bulletin ISTo. 1, two copies. 
Carnegie Institution of Washington: 

Livingston, Relation of Desert Plants to Soil Moisture 

and to Evaporation. 
Davenport, Inheritance in Poultry. 



65 

Wieland, American Fossil Cycads. 

Contributions from the Solar Observatory Mt. Wilson, 
California, ISTos. 9 to 12. 

Stevens, Studies in Spermatogenesis, Pt. 2. 

Washington, Roman Comagmatic Region. 

Parkhurst, Researches in Stellar Photometry. 

Dean, Chimaeroid Fishes and their Development. 

Scripture, Researches in Experimental Phonetics. 

Carnegie Institute Year Book, 1906. 

Richards and Forbes, Energy Changes Involved in Dilu- 
tion of Zinc and Cadmium Amalgams. 

Richards and Behr, Electromotive Force of Iron and 
Effect of Occluded Hydrogen. 

Coblentz, Investigations of Infra Red Spectra, Pts„ 3-4. 

Mayer, Rhythmical Pulsation in Scyphomedusse. 

Dorsey, Pawnee Mythology, Pt. 1. 

Tower, Investigation of Evolution in Chrysomelid Bee- 
tles. 

Jones, Hydrates in Aqueous Solution. 

Pearl, Variation and Differentiation in Ceratophyllum. 

Hill, Collected Mathematical Works, Vol. 4. 

Barus, Condensation of Vapor as Induced by Nuclei 
and Ions. 

Research in China, Vol. 1, 1-2. 

Hasse, Index of Economic Material, Maine, ISTew 
Hampshire. 

Burnham, General Catalogue of Double Stars. 

Richards, Compressibilities of the Elements. 

Richards, Atomic Weights of Potassium. 

MacCurdy and Castle, Selection and Cross Breeding in 
Relation to Inheritance of Coat-Pigments in Rats 
and Guinea Pigs. 

Pearl and Clawson, Variation and Correlation in the 
Crayfish. 

Morse, Further Researches in ISTorth American Acridi- 
idse. 

ISTewcome, Investigation of Inequalities. 

Uhler and Wood, Absorption Spectra. 



66 

• - * 
Perez, Guide to the Materials for American History 

in Cuba. 
Hirth, Syllabary of Chinese Sounds. 
Clemson Agricultural College: 

Calhoun, Determination of Minerals and Rocks of South 

Carolina. 
James, Removal of Stains and Doggett Domestic Dye- 
ing. 
Colorado, University of: Investigations in Psychology and 

Education, Vol. 3, No. 1. 
Columbia University: Fifty-two Dissertations. 
Professor William Wistar Comfort : Comfort, Character 

Types in Old French Chansons de Geste. 
Connecticut State Geology and Natural History Survey: 

Bulletin Nos. 6 to 8. 
Consumers' League of the City of New York: Report for 

1903. 
Dante Society: Annual Report, 1905. 
Mrs. Ellen D. Gillespie Davis: Elizabeth Duane Gillespie, 

Book of Remembrance. 
The Hon. Chauncey Mitchell Depew: Celebration of the 

Birthday of Chauncey Mitchell Depew, 1907. 
Dodd, Mead & Co. : Allen, Efficient Democracy. 
Mr. Albert J. Edmunds : Private library, about 200 volumes. 
Buddhist Texts in John. 
Eairmount Park and other Poems. 
Mr. C. Eldred : Elclred, Ballads and Lyrics. 
Mr. Allen Evans: Glenn, Merion in the Welsh Tract, 1896. 
Evanston Eree Public Library: Annual Report, 1905-06. 
Dr. Tenney Erank : Virgil, iEneid, translated by Conington. 
Eriends' Eree Library and Reading Room, Germantown: 

Annual Report, 1906. 
Eriends' Library: Special list of books, No. 2. 

List of juvenile books. 
George Washington University : Bulletin, Vol. 5, Nos. 3 and 

4 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. 
Georgia, University of : Bulletin, Vol. 6, No. 8. 
Goteborg Stadsbiblioteket : Aarsskrift, Nos. 11 and 12. 



07 

Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania: Memorial volume, Franklin 
Bicentenary Celebration. 

Greenwich House : Fifth Annual Report. 

Harvard University: Library Report, 1906. 

Dr. Richard T. Holbrook: Hills, Evolution of Maeterlinck's 
Dramatic Theory. 

Illinois State Historical Library: Publications, Vol. 11; 
Collections, Vol. 2. 

Illinois State Laboratory Bulletin : ISTos. 6 to 9. 

Indiana Department of Geology and Natural Resources: 
Annual Report, Nos. 26 to 30. 

Indiana Geological Survey: Thirty -first Annual Report. 

Iowa College: Main, Inaugural address, "The College, Its 
Ideals and Its Problems." 

Iowa Geological Survey : Reports, 1905. 

Iowa Secretary of State: Biennial Report of the Bureau of 
Labor Statistics, Vol. 12. 

Iowa, University of : Contributions from the Physical Labora- 
tory, Vol. 1, ISTos. 1 and 2. 

John Crerar Library : Twelfth Annual Report. 

Johns Hopkins University: Krapp, St. Patrick's Purgatory. 
Twenty-six Dissertations. 

Mr. Herman Justi : Justi, Sunday Papers and Addresses on 
Labor Problems. 
Papers and Addresses on Labor Problems. 

Kansas University Geological Survey : Publications !N"os. 6, 8. 

Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian: Annual 
Meeting Proceedings, ]STo. 24. 

Lake Mohonk Conference on the International Arbitration: 
Report of the Annual Meeting, 1906. 

Lehigh University : Astronomical Papers, Vol. 1, Pt. 1. 

Leland Stanford, Jr., University: 

Publications, Trustees Ser., Nos. 14 and 15. 
Aldrich, Catalogue of North America Diptera. 
Fisher, Starfishes of the Hawaiian Islands. 

Litchfield County University Club: Calhoun, Litchfield 
County Sketches. 

Mrs. Rebecca Longstreth : Bible, translated by Charles Thom- 
son, 1808, 4 vols. 



68 

Le Due de Loubat: Codex Borgia, b. 2, 1906. 

Maine Bureau of Industrial and Labor Statistics : Report, 

1906. ' , 

Dr. E. L. Mark: Contributions from the Zoological Labora- 
tory at Harvard, Nos. 174-190. 
Mr. F. R. Marvin : Marvin, Companionship of Books. 

Christ Among the Cattle. 
Maryland Geological Survey : Pliocene and Pleistocene. 
Calvert County and Atlas. 
St. Mary's County and Atlas. 
Maryland Bureau of Statistics : Annual Report, 1906. 
Massachusetts State Board of Charity: Annual Report, 1906. 
Massachusetts Bureau of Labor Statistics: Annual Report, 

1906, Pts. 1-4, 6, 1907 ; Pt. 1, 1907, No. 37. 
The Rev. Charles H. Mattison : Sowing and Reaping, North 

India, 1906. 
Merchants' Association of New York: 

Fuertes, Waste of Water in New York. 

Report of the New York Relief Committee for San 

Francisco. 
Maintenance of Pavements and Administration of 

Streets in New York. 
Protest Against the Proposed Bronx River Valley 

Sewer. 
Year Book, 1907. 
Michigan State Board of Charities and Corrections : Eight- 
eenth Annual Report. 
Michigan Geological Survey : Report for 1905. 
Michigan Schoolmasters' Club: Proceedings Meeting 41. 
Michigan, University of: 

Six Pamphlets, Reprints and Theses. 
Hinsdale, History of the University of Michigan. 
Michigan Academy of Science, Report, 1906. 
Annual Report of the Librarian, 1905-06. 
Minnesota Dept. of Public Instruction : Biennial Report, 

1905-06. 
Missouri Botanical Garden : Annual Report, Vol. 17. 
Miss Isadore G. Mudge : Stevenson, Treasure Island, 2 
copies. 



69 

Nashville, University of : Bulletin, Vol. 5, No. 6. 

New Jersey Bureau of Labor Statistics : Annual Report, 
1906. 

New Jersey Geologist : Annual Report, 1905. 

New York City Board of Education: Annual Report, 1905. 

New York City Tenement House Commission : Second Re- 
port. 

New York State Education Dept. : Bulletin, Nos. 352, 375, 
384, 388, 390. 

New York State Commissioner of Labor : Annual Report, 
1905, 1906. 

New York State — Bureau of Labor Statistics: Annual Re- 
port, Vol 23. 

New York State Library: Bulletin, Nos. 107, 109. 

New Zealand Dept. of Tourist and Health Resorts : Eacts 
about New Zealand. 

Newberry Library: Report, 1907. 

North Carolina, University of : Studies in Psychology, Vol. 1. 
Bulletins, Vol. 22, Pt. 2. 

Mr. Isaac P. Noyes : Noyes, Poems on the Thirteen Original 
States. 

Oberlin College Library: Annual Report, 1905-06. 

Ohio Geological Survey: Vols. 8-9. 

Peabody Museum : Papers, Vol. 3, No. 4 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. 

Peace Association of Friends : Tolstoy's Letter on the Russo- 
Japanese War. 

Pennsylvania Water Supply Commission: Report, 1905-06. 

Pennsylvania, University of : Archaeology Department Trans- 
actions, Vol. 2, Pt. 1. 
Contributions from the Zoological Laboratory, Vol. 12. 
Boardman Lectureship : Huckel, Modern Study of Con- 
science. 

Philadelphia City Institute: Annual Report, 1906. 

Philadelphia Free Library : Bulletin No. 7. 
Report, 1907. 

Philadelphia Board of Education: Catalogue of the Peda- 
gogical Library. 

Pratt Institute Free Library: Report, 1906. 



70 

Princeton University Library: 

Loetscher, Schwenckfeld's Participation in the Euchar- 
istic Controversy of the Sixteenth Century. 
' Collins, Nassau Hall. 
Providence Public Library: Annual Report, Vol. 29. 
Southern History Association: Publications, Vol. 10, No. 6. 
Religious Society of Friends, Great Britain: Christian Dis- 
cipline of Society of Friends, 1906. 
St. Louis University : Bulletin, Vol. 2, ISTo. 3. 
Savannah Mayor's Office: MacDonell, Code of Savannah. 
Professor Albert Schinz: Couturat, Eine Weltsprache oder 

drei ? 
Smithsonian Institution : Contributions to Knowledge, Vol. 
34. 
Annual Report, 1904, 1905. 
Smithsonian Institution International Exchange : 
Acad, de Paris, Rapports 1 and 2, 1904-05. 
Univ. de Paris, Bibliotheque de la faculte des lettres, 

1907. 
Programmes, 1906-1907. 

Cartault, un Siecle de Philologie Latine Classique. 
Catalogue des Theses et Ecrits Academiques, 1905-06. 
Smithsonian Institution: Miscellaneous Collection, Nos. 

1652, 1656, 1695, 1703, 1721. 
Strassburg, Universitaets und Landes Bibliothek: Thirty 

Dissertations. 
Syracuse Public Library: Annual Report, 1906. 
Tennessee Mining Department : Annual Report, Vol. 15. 
Texas, University of: Bulletins Eos. 81-82, 85, 92. 
Trinity College : Bulletin, Vol. 4, No. 3. 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture: Annual Report of Secretary, 
1906. 
Biological Survey, Division of N. A. Eauna, No. 26. 
Experiment Stations Annual Report, 1905. 
U. S. Bureau of American Ethnology: Annual Report, 
Vol. 24. 
Bulletin No. 30, Pt. 1. 
IT. S. Census: Twelfth Census Statistical Atlas, 1900. 
Special Reports : Insane and Feeble Minded, 1904. 
Paupers, 1904. 



71 

Blind and Deaf, 1900. 
Mortality, 1906. 
Wealth, Debt and Taxation. 
Manufactures, Pt. 1, 1905. 
Statistics of Women at Work, 1900. 
U. S. Civil Service Commission : Report, Vols. 21-22. 
U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey: Report, 1906. 
IT. S. Dept. of Commerce and Labor: Annual Report of 
Lighthouse Board, 1906. 
Bureau of Standards : Bulletins, Vol. 2, ISTo. 3 ; Vol. 
3, Nos. 1-2. 
U. S. Bureau of Education : Annual Report of the Commis- 
sioner, 1905, Vol. 1-2. 
La Chronique de France, 1904. 
Lexis : Public Education in the German Empire. 
Bulletin, Nos. 2, 3. 

Alaska Division, Annual Report on the Introduction of 

Domestic Reindeer into Alaska, Vol. 15. 

U. S. Bureau of Fisheries : Documents, ~Nos. 611, 615-617. 

U. S. Geological Survey: Geologic Atlas, ISTos. 137, 139-145. 

Geologic Atlas, 56 sheets. 

Bulletin, Nos. 279, 283-286, 289-290, 292, 293, 295- 

303, 305-307, 310, 315. 
Monographs, ISTo. 50. 

Professional Paper, No. 32, 34, 36, 40-42. 
U. S. Interstate Commerce Commission: Annual Report, 

1906. 
U. S. Labor Commission : Twelfth Special Report. 
U. S. Library of Congress : Preliminary Checklist of Amer- 
ican Almanacs. 
Washington Papers, Vol. 1. 

1ST aval Records of American Revolution, 1775-88. 
Journals of the Continental Congress, Vols. 7 and 8. 
Select List of Books on Municipal Affairs. 
Select List of References on Anglo-Saxon Interests. 
Select List of Works Relating to Employers' Liability. 
List of Books Relating to Child Labor. 
List of Works Relating to American Occupation of the 
Philippine Islands, 1898-1903. 



72 

List of Cartularies (principally French) recently added 
to the Library of Congress. 
. Select List of Works Relating to Taxation of Inheri- 
tances. 
List of Works Relating to the French Alliance in the 

"American Revolution. 
Select List of Books Relating to Iron and Steel in Com- 
merce. 
Select List of Books on Reciprocity with Canada. 
Classification, Class Q — Science. 
Report of Librarian, 1897, 1906. 
IT. S. Mining Bureau (Manila) : Bulletin, Nos. 4, 5. 
U. S. National Museum: Contributions from the U. S. Na- 
tional Herbarium, Vol. 10, Nos. 2-5, Vol. 11. 
Bulletin, Nos. 50 4 , 53 1 , 56-59. 
Proceedings, Vol. 31. 
U. S. Dept. of Navy: Naval War Records — Official Records 
of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War 
of the Rebellion, Ser. 1, Vol. 21. 
U. S. Dept. of State: Documentary History of the Constitu- 
tion, Vol. 4. 
U. S. Treasury Dept. : Bureau of Public Health and Marine 
Hospital Service. 
Weekly Public Health Report, Vol. 21, Pt. 1. 
Annual Report of the Surgeon General, 1905. 
U. S. Dept. of War: Annual Report, 1906. 

Annual Report of Philippine Commission, Vol. 3. 
U. S. Weather Bureau : Bulletins, P, Q. 

Daily River Stages, Pt. VII. 
University Club (New York) : Annual, 1907-08. 
Miss Elsie A. Wallace : Applebee, English Field Hockey. 
Wagner, Simple Life. 
Machiavelli, Prince. 

Fasnacht, French Course, Second and Third Year. 
David, Guide enseignement de l'histoire universelle. 
Webster, Handy American Dictionary. 
Arnold, Guide to English Literature. 
Scribe, Adrienne Lecouvreur. 



73 

Choix de nouvelles modemes, Vol. 2. 
The Hon. I. P. Wanger: Moore, Digest Int. Law, 8 vols. 
Memorial Address on Rufus K. Polk. 
Memorial Address on M. S. Quay. 
Memorial Address on R. W. Townshend. 
Memorial Address on J. P. Walker. 
Memorial Address on L. F. Watson. 
Washington University Association: Bulletin 5. 
Wellcome Chemical Research Laboratories : Papers, E~os. 

57-62. 
Mr. Oswin W. Willcox : AVillcox, Viscous vs. Granular The- 
ory of Glacial Motion. 
Wisconsin, Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics : Bi- 
ennial Report, Vol. 12. 
Wisconsin Free Library : Bulletin, Vol. 1, ISTos. 4-10 ; Vol. 2, 

No. 6. 
Wisconsin, University of: Hauzmann, Sprache und Stil cles 
. jungen Herder. 
Smiley, Latinitas. 
Sammis, Relation of Chemical Activity to Electrolytic 

Conductivity. 
Anderson, Spectroscopic Study of the Spark Spectrum. 
Shinn, Optical Rotatory Power of Salts, 2 copies. 
Ingersoll, Faraday and Kerr .Effects in Infra-red Spec- 
trum. 
Watts, Borides and Silicides. 

Nichols, Binucleated Cells in Some Basidomycetes. 
Professor J. Edmund Wright: Fine, College Algebra. 



74 



' Report of the Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

To the President : Madam, 

I have the honor to make the following report on the 
work of the department of athletics and gymnastics for the 
year 1906-07. At the beginning of the year the gymnastic 
department was entirely reorganised. The revised rules 
read: 

1. A physical examination of every student is required twice 
each year. An annual medical examination by the Visiting Physician 
of the College is required of all students taking part in competitive 
athletics. Students not examined will immediately be taken off the 
sports' list. 

2. Any student who is dissatisfied in regard to the omission of 
her name from the approved lists for the various sports shall be enti- 
tled to refer the matter at issue to the President of the College, who 
will arrange with the Visiting Physician of the College for the stu- 
dent to consult, at her own expense, a specialist selected by the Col- 
lege, to whom the student will be required in every case to present a 
note from the Visiting Physician, explaining the circumstances and 
asking for his opinion in writing. Such opinion will then be care- 
fully considered and will, whenever possible, be accepted as suf- 
ficient authorisation for the student to play in the sport she desires. 

3. Four periods of exercise must be registered each week by all 
resident and non-resident undergraduates and hearers. These periods 
may not be taken on the same day. Whole or half periods only 
may be registered. Exercise not registered within the fortnight 
it is taken will not count, and must be made up. Exercise taken 
on Sunday, or during college vacations, or during the time that a 
student has an official excuse, will not count. Delinquent exercise, 
or making up, exercise, may be taken on the same day as the regu- 
lar exercise. 

4. Exercise not taken within a fortnight of the required time 
will be put on the Delinquent List. Delinquent exercise not regis- 
tered within a fortnight will be doubled. 

5. At the end of the second semester, i. e., the Saturday before 
"finals," every student who has not finished the required periods of 
exercise shall pay a fine of $1.00 for each period due, and shall be 
required, in addition, to make up double the number of missing 
periods within the next two weeks, at the end of which time $2.00 
must be paid for each period of exercise unregistered. 



75 

6. During November four periods of tennis or swimming or 
hockey or four drills, and in April four periods of tennis or swim- 
ming or basket-ball, or four drills must be registered. From Thanks- 
giving to April 1st two drills a week must be registered. Each stu- 
dent is excused two drills every four weeks; students not taking 
these excuses may count these drills to their credit. 

7. Students who have not completed the required number of drills 
by the close of the gymnasium season shall be required to make up 
the missing drills, and shall pay a fine of $2.00 for each such ap- 
pointment for special instruction, until the required number is com- 
pleted. 

8. No student may enter a class after the door has been closed. 
In all classes the regulation gymnasium suit must be worn. 

9. Freshmen and sophomores are required to take one period 
of heavy and one period of light gymnastics a week, and sopho- 
mores may, in addition, take fencing or dancing. Juniors and seniors 
may elect light or heavy gymnastics, fencing or dancing, but may 
not continue in any class if unable to keep up to the required 
standard. 

10. Two excuses are allowed every four weeks, and must be 
registered on the registration list in the week they are required, 
otherwise they are cancelled. 

11. Special excuses for illness must be obtained from the Director 
of the gymnasium within the fortnight they are required. Excuses 
will be given for illness lasting not less than two days only, and 
will excuse classes for the current week only, and will not excuse 
drills previously omitted, for which, if not made up, a fine must be 
paid at the end of the year. 



The principal changes incorporated in these rules are 
the medical examination of every resident student in the col- 
lege, the rules in regard to obtaining excuses for omitting 
exercise, and the imposition of fines for failure to do the pre- 
scribed exercise. For competitive athletics especially it was 
considered important that the condition of the heart and lungs 
should be examined by a practicing physician as well as by 
the gymnastic department, and that a careful report of this 
examination should be kept. A card was drawn up on which 
the medical examination of each student could be entered in 
each year. It had been the custom for the Assistant to the 
President to send information to the Director of Gym- 
nastics when a student was ill or for any legitimate rea- 



76 



son was prevented from attending the gymnasium. It was 
found that by this system this information frequently did not 
reach the gymnasium early enough for the student to be given 
her excuse at the necessary time and that excuses were some- 
times duplicated. A card is now filled out by the student at 
the time she wishes to be excused and approved and signed by 
the Director. This regulation has led to a reduction in the 
number of excuses from exercise. During October and No- 
vember, 1907, 12 students were excused, as against 56 in 
the months of October and November in the year 1906. 
In regard to fines for uncompleted exercise the report for 
the year 1905 showed the necessity for some penalty for 
failure to do the required exercise. During this year 702 peri- 
ods of exercise were left undone and 226 drills, one stu- 
dent having omitted 51 periods of exercise and 10 drills. 
At the end of the second semester of the year 1906-07 
no student had omitted any exercise and only one stu- 
dent had omitted drills. The four drills which she had 
omitted were made up and the fines of $2 a drill for the 
drills she had omitted paid. In addition, all the students 
who had omitted work in the previous year had, with one 
exception, made up the work they had missed. A card of 
the following form was used for filing each student'3 gym- 
nastic record: 





































Gymnasium 




































Total 
































































RECORD 


No. Periods 






























Excuses 




























Sera. 1. 


Delinquent List 




























Sem. 11. 


Doubled 






























Total 




























Sera. 1. 






























Sem. 11. 






No. Periods 




























Sem. I. 


Excuses 




























Sem. II. 


Delinquent Lisfj* 






























Doubled 




























Sem. 1. 


Total 




























Sem. 11. 



77 

The opportunity to substitute athletic exercise for gym- 
nastics through November and April was given to the stu- 
dents, since it was found that vigorous outdoor exercise and 
gymnastic classes could not be taken on the same day with- 
out undue physical strain, and that the outdoor exercise was 
at this season of the year as valuable as indoor work. 

Fencing and classic dancing, or aesthetic gymnastics, 
were added to the general gymnastic course. Both these are 
advanced types of gymnastic work, and as the course is com- 
pulsory in all the four years of the college course the desire 
of the students for more advanced work was recognised as 
legitimate. Only one period a week of dancing or fencing 
was permitted to be taken. 

During the last two weeks in November a light gymnastic 
class was held daily for students not substituting athletics. 
After Thanksgiving the regular classes began, the "weekly 
schedule including four fencing classes, four classic dancing 
classes, six light gymnastic classes, five heavy gymnastic 
classes. One hundred and thirteen students registered for 
fencing, one hundred and twenty-six students registered for 
classic dancing. All the sophomores and freshmen are re- 
quired to take one light gymnastic and one heavy gymnastic 
class a week. 

The following excuses were granted in the year 1906-07 
on account of physical inability ; four sophomores were ex- 
cused from heavy gymnastics, eight freshmen were excused 
from heavy gymnastics, and substituted an extra period of 
light gymnastics. Three seniors, two juniors, one sophomore, 
and three freshmen were excused from all gymnastic work. 

The gymnasium was reserved in the mornings for indi- 
vidual corrective work for spinal curvature, defective posture, 
undeveloped chests, etc. Thirty-eight students were given 
special exercises. This work was not compulsory, and was 
taken in addition to the regular gymnastic course. 

On March 25, 1907, an exhibition in fencing and 
classic dancing was given by the seniors and juniors, and a 
contest was held between the sophomores and freshmen in 
marching tactics, wand drill, Indian club drill, bar bell drill, 



78 

apparatus work on the horse, parallel bars, and rope climb- 
ing. The contest was won by the sophomores, the points 
being: Sophomores, 113; Freshmen, 92. 

From Thanksgiving to Easter a weekly class was held 
for the graduate students, at which there was an average 
attendance of twenty. 

Athletics. 

Calendar of Athletic Events for the Year 1906-07. 

October 5th — Hockey practice began. 

November 2nd — Hockey match vs. Belmont C. C. 

November 5th — Interclass hockey matches began. 

November 10th — Hockey match vs. Merion C. C. 

November 24th — Hockey, match vs. Germantown C. C. 

November 27th — Hockey match vs. Moorestown C. C. 

December 4th — Hockey match vs. Belmont C. C. 

December 7th — Fencing club practice started. 

December 10th — Water polo practice started. 

January 10th- — Swimming contest, preliminary. 

January 17th — Swimming contest, finals. 

February 11th — Track practice started. 

February 27th — Track meet preliminaries. 

March 7th — Track meet, finals. 

April 4th — Basket-ball practice began. 

May 6th — Interclass basket-ball matches began. 

June 5th — Basket-ball match vs. alumnse. 

The Athletic Association completed the new hockey field 
and laid out three new tennis courts at the cost of $2,000, 
$800 of this being advanced by President Thomas. 

Tennis. — The Athletic Association, for the first time, 
organised tennis on the same principles as all the other 
athletic sports. Class captains were elected who managed a 
class tournament held in each class. The captains chose their 
class team to enter the interclass tournament, and each cap- 
tain entered one player for the college championship. Un- 
der this new system greater interest was taken in tennis gen- 



79 

erally and the tournaments were played off promptly. The 
class championship was won by 19 07. The college cham- 
pionship was won by A. G. Hill, 1907. 

Hockey. — Seventy-seven per cent of the resident under- 
graduates played hockey. The upper field was used by the 
first teams, the lower field, in bad condition, was used by the 
second team. There were nine teams of ten or eleven stu- 
dents each, and eighty-five students played on the teams. 
The class championship was won by 1907. The captains of 
the first teams were : E. Williams, 1907 ; L. T. Sharpless, 
1908 ; E. D. Brown, 1909, and E. Denison, 1910. In the 
Bryn Mawr games with outside teams the college won four 
games and lost one. Twenty-one goals were scored and seven 
goals were lost during the season. 

Lacrosse was played during the winter, but was not or- 
ganised. 

The Fencing Club was unorganised, but met for practice 
once a week. 

Swimming. — The Class Championship was won by 
1907. The records were as follows: 

140-foot swim on front, 45 2-3 seconds. 
140-foot swim on back, 49 2-5 seconds. 
Dive for form. 

Plunge for distance, 30 feet, 5 inches. . 
70-foot swim on front, 20 seconds. 
70-foot swim on back, 23 2-5 seconds. 
Swim under water, 70 feet. 

Three records were broken in the contest: the 70-foot 
swim on front, 70-foot swim on back and the under-water 
swim. 

The class relay race was won by 1910. 

One hundred and forty-seven students were authorised 
to take swimming, seventy took swimming lessons. 

Water Polo. — There were four teams ; twenty-seven stu- 
dents played. Interclass games were held and the champion- 
ship was won by 1907. 



80 

Track Athletics. — The Track Meet class championship 
was won by 1908. The college championship was won by 
A. E. Piatt, 1909. The events and records were: 

Fifteen-yard dash. 

Hurdles. 

Kick — -16 inches. 

Rope climb — 12^ seconds. 

Running high jump, 4 feet, 2 inches. 

Standing high jump— 3 feet, 5 inches. 

Putting the shot — 33 feet, 1 inch. 

Tug-of-war. 

Standing broad jump, 7 feet, 3^ inches. 

Three broad jumps, 22 feet, 1 inch. 

Hop, step, jump, 20 feet, 2 inches. 

Fence vault, 4 feet, 6 inches. 

Ping high jump, 7 feet, 4 inches. 

Class relay race. 

College records were broken in the rope climbing and 
three broad jumps. 

The world's record was broken in putting the 12-pound 
shot. 

Basket-Bali. — Fifty five per cent of the resident under- 
graduate students played basket-ball. There were eight 
teams, seventy-one students playing on the teams. The Class 
Championship was won by 1908. The captains of the first 
teams were: G. Hutchins, 1907; M. Plaisted, 1908 ; A. E. 
Piatt, 1909 ; G. Kingsbacher, 1910. 

Skating. — The skating pond was enclosed by a fence, 
and no one was permitted to skate who did not carry a ticket. 
Tickets were sold by the College to students and members 
of the faculty and staff and to students from the schools in 
the neighborhood. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Constance M. K. Applebee., 
Director of Gymnastics and Athletics. 



SI 



Report of the Attending Physician. 

To the President: Madam, 

As a summary of the work done during the college year 
1906-07, I make the following report: 

Cases Treated. 
Surgical : 

Moderate injury, including sprains and contusions 14 

Appendicitis, with operation 1 

Medical : 

Tonsilitis 36 

Cold 34 

Influenza 13 

Neurasthenia 8 

Pharyngitis 7 

Bronchitis 11 

Neuralgia 4 

Ring-worm 3 

Conjunctivitis 3 

Nervous exhaustion 3 

Laryngitis 3 

General asthenia 2 

Rheumatism 1 

Chicken-pox 1 

German measles 1 

Asthma 1 

Menorrhagia 1 

Dysmenorrhea 1 

Styes 1 

Acne 1 

Nervous chills 1 



82 

Adenitis of cervical glands 1 

Erythema multiforme 1 

Appendicitis, catarrhal 1 

Appendicitis, neuralgic 1 



155 



The occurrence of 36 cases of tonsilitis, following a 
celebration at which a loving cup was used, suggests the 
advisability of ruling out a common drinking vessel on future 
occasions of like character. 

Again, it is a pleasure to report that one case of chicken- 
pox and one case of German measles have been cared for with- 
out the appearance of secondary cases. We have continued 
rigidly to enforce isolation in the cases of a contagious nature, 
and it is rather remarkable that no secondary tonsilitis cases 
appeared after the epidemic following the use of the drinking 
cup. 

Another student was operated on for acute appendicitis 
and made an excellent recovery, Dr. Robert G. LeConte hav- 
ing performed both the operation this year and the one last 
year. 

It would seem right in this report to mention the case of 
the refusal of a believer in mental science to receive medical 
treatment. Her desperate illness with the danger of im- 
pending death, led us to rule that in future every student 
admitted to the college must submit to medical care and must 
report any disability promptly to the warden of her hall. 
Yours very sincerely, 

Thomas F. Branson, 
Attending Physician. 



83 



Report of the Visiting Physician of the College. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to submit the following report for the 
year 1906-07. 

I. During the college year, October 4, 1906, to June 
1, 1907, seventy patients were cared for in the college infirm- 
ary building. The total number of days' care amounted to 
385. The capacity (4 beds) was frequently fully occupied, 
to the exclusion of other cases necessarily taken care of in 
their rooms in their respective dormitories. The total num- 
ber of those so excluded was fifty-two. On one occasion 
twenty-two cases of tonsilitis were cared for in the halls, 
and probably as many more students who should have been 
in bed did not report illness because of the lack of possibility 
of adequate care. 

The classification of Infirmary Cases is as follows 

Abscess of ear 1 

Bronchitis. 8 

Chicken-pox 2 

Colds and Influenza 17 

Concussion of brain 1 

Conjunctivitis (infective) 3 

Laceration of forehead 1 

Measles 1 

Mumps 3 

Nervous exhaustion 2 

Neuralgia 2 

Pleurisy 1 

Sprains 2 

Tonsilitis 17 

Miscellaneous 9 

Total 70 



84 

II. The report of my }3ersonal work in the office and 
dormitories is as follows : 

Physical examinations 154 

Number of students' visits to office 688 

Number of visits to students confined to their rooms. . 8 

Vaccinations 145 

Total number of consultations 696 

III. Tabulation of conditions treated. 

Medical : 

Acne 1 

Adenitis 1 

Alveolitis 1 

Arthritis 1 

Bronchitis 2 

Climatic depression 1 

Colds 15 

Conjunctivitis 2 

Constipation 5 

Haemoptysis 1 

Headache 3 

Impaired hearing 2 

Indigestion (acute) 1 

Indigestion (intestinal) 1 

Insomnia 3 

Laryngitis 2 

Myositis 1 

Nervous exhaustion 5 

Neuralgia 1 

Pediculosis 3 

Pharyngitis 8 

Rheumatism 2 

Spinal curvature 1 

Tonsilitis 3 

Tracheitis 8 

Urticaria 1 



85 



Surgical : 



Abscess 1 

Boils 1 

Carbuncle 1 

Flatfoot 1 

Ingrown toe-nail 1 

Muscular strain 9 

Splinters in knee 1 

Sprain of ankle 1 

Btye 1 

Warts on foot 2 

Wound of eyelid 1 

Gynaecological : 

Displacement of uterus 2 

Menstrual Disorders : 

Amennorrhoea • 9 

Dysmenorrhea 4 

Menorrhagia 4 

Ovarian neuralgia 1 

IV. Tabulation of students treated by classes (exclu- 
sive of physical examinations and vaccinations) : 

Graduates 19 

Seniors 19 

Juniors 15 

Sophomores 16 

Freshman 16 

Freshmen . 34 

Total 103 

The great need of a new infirmary cannot be too strongly 
urged. The present building is so utterly inadequate for the 
demands of the medical work, and the present methods of 
caring for the students when ill so unsatisfactory and ex- 



86 

pensive, that this whole department is entirely out of keep- 
ing with the rest of the college equipment. I trust that the 
efforts now being put forth to remedy the evil may be suc- 
cessful. 

In conclusion I wish to repeat my recommendation of 
last summer, that the use of the loving-cup as a drinking 
vessel be prohibited. The experience of the year, with the 
large number of cases of tonsilitis following such use on one 
occasion, demonstrates the danger of the custom. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ella B. Everitt j 
Visiting Physician of the College. 



Appendices. 



I. 

Promotions, Reappointments, and Changes in the Academic 
and Administrative Staff for the Year 1907-08. 

Hermann Collitz, Ph.D., Professor of Comparative Philology and 
German, resigned to accept the Professorship of Germanic Philol- 
ogy in Johns Hopkins University. 

Charles McLean Andrews, Ph.D., L.H.D., Professor of History, re- 
signed to accept the Professorship of History in Johns Hopkins 
University. 

Joseph W. Warren, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology, re- 
appointed. 

Florence Bascom, Ph.D., Professor of Geology, returned after one 

year's leave of absence. 
Wilmer Cave Wright, Ph.D., Lecturer in Greek Literature, promoted 

to be Associate Professor of Greek. 

James H. Leuba, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Education and 
Director of the Psychological Laboratory, granted leave of 
absence for one year. 

David Irons, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy, deceased, January 23rd, 
1907. 

David Wilbur Horn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry, term 
expired. 

William B. Huff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics, reappointed. 

William Roy Smith, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Professor of 
History. 

Benjamin Le Roy Miller, Ph.D., Associate in Geology, resigned to 
accept the Professorship of Geology in Lehigh University. 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, A.B., Lecturer in English, reappointed. 

Clarence Carroll Clark, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Professor 
of English, returned after one year's leave of absence on account 
of illness. 

87 



88 

George W. Tapley Whitney, Ph.D., Associate in Philosophy, re- 
signed to accept an Instructorship in Princeton University 

Nettie Maria Stevens, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Morphology, 
reappointed. 

Henry Raymond Mussey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics 
and Politics, resigned to accept the Assistant Professorship of 
Sociology in the Wharton School of Finance and Commerce of 
the University of Pennsylvania. 

Carleton Fairchild Brown, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Pro- 
fessor of English. 

Caroline Louise Ransom, Ph.D., Associate in the History of Art and 
Classical Archaeology, reappointed. 

Robert Matteson Johnston, M.A., appointed Associate Professor of 
History. Mr. Johnston received the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
from the University of Cambridge, England, in 1889, and the 
degree of Master of Arts in 1900. He was Lecturer in History 
at Harvard University from 1904 to 1907, at Mt. Holyoke Col- 
lege from 1904 to 1906, and at Simmons College from 1905 to 1906. 

Theodore de Leo de Laguna, Ph.D., appointed Associate Professor 
of Philosophy. Dr. de Laguna received the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts from the University of California in 1896, the degree of 
Master of Arts in 1899, and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
from Cornell University in 1901. He taught in the Government 
Schools of the Philippine Islands from 1901 to 1904, was Honor- 
ary Fellow and Assistant in Philosophy in Cornell University 
from 1904 to 1905, and Assistant Professor of the Philosophy of 
Education in the University of Michigan from 1905 to 1907. 

Charles Clarence Williamson, Ph.D., appointed Associate in Eco- 
nomics and Politics. Dr. Williamson received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts from Western Reserve University in 1904, and 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Columbia University 
in 1907. He was Assistant in Economics and Graduate Student 
in Western Reserve University in the first semester, 1904-05 ; 
Scholar in Political Economy in the University of Wisconsin 
from 1904 to 1905, Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin, 
1905 to 1906 ; University Fellow in Political Economy, Columbia 
University, 1906 to 1907, and Research Assistant of the Carnegie 
Institution, 1905 to 1907. 

George Shannon Forbes, Ph.D., appointed Associate in Chemistry. 
Dr. Forbes received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Har- 
vard University in 1902, Master of Arts in 1904, and Doctor of 
Philosophy in 1905. He was lecturer in Physical Chemistry in 



89 

Harvard University from 1905 to 1906 * and John Harvard Fellow 
and student in the Universities of Berlin and Leipsic, 1906 to 1907. 

Daniel Webster Ohern, Ph.D., appointed Associate in Geology. 
Dr. Ohern received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Drake 
University in 1898, Master of Arts from the University of West 
Virginia in 1899, and Doctor of Philosophy from Johns Hopkins 
University in 1907. He was Assistant in Greek, in the Uni- 
versity of West Virginia from 1899 to 1901, and Instructor in 
Greek from 1901 to 1903 ; Assistant in Geology in Johns Hop- 
kins University from 1903 to 1905, Scholar in Geology from 
1905 to 1906, and Fellow in Geology from 1906 to 1907. 

Marion Reilly, A.B., appointed Dean of the College and Reader in 
Philosophy. Miss Reilly received the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts from Bryn Mawr College in 1901, was a Graduate Student 
in Bryn Mawr College in 1901-02, and 1902-03 (second semester), 
and from 1903 to 1906 ; and Graduate Student in Newnham Col- 
lege, University of Cambridge, England, in the spring term. 
1907. 

Percy Waldron Long, Ph.D., Lecturer in English Literature, during 
Dr. Clarence Carroll Clark's leave of absence, term expired. 

Clarence Errol Ferree, A.M., M.S., appointed Lecturer in Psychology. 
Mr. Ferree received the degree of Bachelor of Science from Ohio 
Wesleyan University in 1900, the degree of Master of Arts in 
1901, and the degree of Master of Science in 1902. He was 
Fellow in Psychology in Cornell University from 1902 to 1903, 
and Assistant in Psychology from 1903 to 1907. 

Clarence D. Ashley, LL.D., J.D., Non-resident Lecturer in Law, 
reappointed. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., Non-resident Lecturer in English Dic- 
tion, reappointed. 

Rose Chamberlin, M.A., Reader in German, reappointed. 

Harriet Randolph, Ph.D., Demonstrator in Biology and Reader in 
Botany, reappointed. 

Helen Strong Hoyt, A.M., Reader in English, resigned. 

Katharine Fullerton, A.M., Reader in English, reappointed. 

Regtna Katharine Crandall, Ph.D., Reader in English, reappointed. 

Katharine Lord, A.B., Reader in English, resigned. 

Orie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., Reader in English, reappointed. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., Reader in English, reappointed. 

Abby Kirk, A.M., Reader in Greek, reappointed. 



90 

Mabion Pabeis, A.B., appointed Reader in Economics and Politics. 
Miss Parris received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn 
Mawr College in 1901. She was a Graduate Student in Bryn 
Mawr College from 1902 to 1905, and Fellow in Economics and 
Politics from 1905 to 1906; in 1906-07 Bryn Mawr College Re- 
search Fellow in Economics and Politics and Student at the 
University of Vienna. 

Helen Wabd, A.B., appointed Reader in English. Miss Ward re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Radcliffe College in 
1900 and was a Graduate Student in Radcliffe College from 
1902 to 1904. 

Beetha Maeion Pillsbuey, A.M., appointed Reader in English. Miss 
Pillsbury received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the 
University of Illinois in 1895, and the degree of Master of Arts 
from Radcliffe College in 1898. She was a Graduate Student 
in Radcliffe College from 1896 to 1S9S and from 1906 to 1907. 
She was Instructor in English in the University of Illinois from 
1904 to 1906. 

Geace Maxwell Feenald, Ph.D., appointed Reader in Education and 
Demonstrator in Psychology. Dr. Fernald received the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts from Mt. Holyoke College in 1903, the 
degree of Master of Arts from Mt. Holyoke College in 1905, 
and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from the University of 
Chicago in 1907. She was a Graduate Student in Mt. Holyoke 
College from 1903 to 1904; Graduate Scholar in Bryn Mawr 
College from 1904 to 1906, and Fellow in Psychology in the 
University of Chicago from 1906 to 1907. 

Maud Downing, A.B., appointed Reader in Semitic Languages. Miss 
Downing received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the Uni- 
versity of Toronto in 1902. She was a Graduate Student in the 
University of Toronto from 1902 to 1903, and Graduate Scholar 
in Semitic Languages in Bryn Mawr College from 1903 to 1907. 

Grace Mead Andeus de Laguna, Ph.D., appointed Reader in Philoso- 
phy. Dr. de Laguna received the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
from Cornell University in 1903 and the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy in 1906. She held the Sage Scholarship in Philoso- 
phy at Cornell University from 1903 to 1905 and the Alice Free- 
man Palmer Fellowship of Wellesley College from 1905 to 1906. 

Claea Leonoea Nicolay, Ph.D., appointed Reader in French. Dr. 
Nicolay received the diploma and title of L.L. A. from the Uni- 
versity of St. Andrews in 1900, the degree of Master of Arts 
from the University of Pennsylvania in 1901. and the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy in 1907. She studied in the University 



91 

of Pennsylvania from 1899 to 1904, and from 1905 to 1907, and in 
France and Germany in 1903. 

Bebtha Cornelia Nokbis, A.B., appointed Reader in Latin. Miss 
Norris received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr 
College in 1904. 

Frances Lowater, B.Sc, Ph.D., Demonstrator in Physics, returned 
after one year's leave of absence. 

Gertrude Langden Heritage, A.B., Demonstrator in Chemistry, re- 
appointed. 

Helen Elizabeth Schaeffer, A.B., Demonstrator in Physics, sub- 
stitute appointment expired. 

Clara Jean Weidensall, A.B., Demonstrator in Psychology, term 
expired. 

Una McMahon, A.B., appointed Demonstrator in History of Art and 
Classic Archaeology. Miss McMahon received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts from Smith College in 1904. Graduate 
Student in Greek and Classical Archaeology in the University 
of Chicago from 1894 to 1895 and from 1896 to 1899; Stu- 
dent at the University of Berlin from 1900 to 1901, at the 
American School of Classical Studies, Rome, from 1902 to 1904, 
and at the University of Oxford in 1906 and 1907. 

Florence Hanington, A.B., Secretary of the College, resigned. 

Anna Bell Lawther, A.B., appointed Secretary of the College. Miss 
Lawther received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryu 
Mawr College in 1897. She was Assistant Bursar in Bryn Mawr 
College from 1898 to 1900, Graduate Student from 1898 to 1899 
and from 1904 to 1905, and Warden of Merion Hall from Feb- 
ruary, 1904, to June, 1905. 

Ethel McCoy Walker, A.M., appointed Recording Secretary, and 
reappointed Appointment Secretary. 

Emily Ledyard Shields, A.M., Recording Secretary and Appointment 
Secretary, resigned. 

Isadore Gilbert Mudge, Ph.B., B.L.S., reappointed Librarian and 
granted one year's leave of absence. 

Mary Letitia Jones, A.B., B.L.S., appointed Acting Librarian. Miss 
Jones received the degree of Bachelor of Letters from the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska in 1885, and the degree of Bachelor of Li- 
brary Science from the New York State Library School in 1902 ; 
she was acting Librarian and Adjunct Professor of Bibliography 
in the University of Nebraska from 1892 to 1897, Librarian and 
Assistant Professor of Library* Economy in the University of 



92 

Illinois in 1897, Classifier in the Iowa State Library in 189S, 
Second Assistant Librarian in the Los Angeles Public Library 
from 1898 to 1899, and Librarian from 1900 to 1905 ; Director of 
, the School of Library Methods in the Summer School of the 
University of California in 1906 and 1907. 

Minnie Earl Sears, M.S., B.L.S., Head Cataloguer, resigned. 

Edna Lucy Goss,. B.L.S., appointed Head Cataloguer. Miss Goss 
received the degree of Bachelor of Library Science from the 
University of Illinois in 1902. She was Cataloguer in the 
Library of the University of California from 1903 to 1905 and 
Librarian in the Illinois State Library of Natural History from 
1905 to 1906. 

Marian Cinderella Bell, A.B., B.L.S., appointed Assistant Cata- 
loguer. Miss Bell received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from 
the University of Nebraska in 1904 and the degree of Bachelor 
of Library Science from the University of Illinois in 1906. She 
was Assistant in the School of Education Library in the Uni- 
versity of Chicago in 1906. 

Bessie Homer Jennings, appointed Special Cataloguer. Miss Jen- 
nings graduated at the Drexel Institute Library School in 1900. 

Emma Isabella Sisson, Assistant Director of Athletics and Gym- 
nastics, reappointed. 

Mary Warben Taylor, Keeper of Gymnastic Records, reappointed. 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D., Attending Physician of the College, re- 
appointed. 

Ella B. Everitt, M.D., Visiting Physician of the College, reappointed. 

Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Warden and Assistant Adviser to 
the Freshmen of Pembroke Hall, reappointed. 

Alice Anthony, A.B., Warden and Assistant Adviser to the Fresh- 
men of Denbigh Hall, reappointed. 

Vieginia Tryon Stoddard, A.B., Warden and Assistant Adviser to 
the Freshmen of Radnor Hall, reappointed. 

Elizabeth Farris Stoddard, A.B., Warden and Assistant Adviser to 
the Freshmen of Merion Hall, reappointed. 

Mary Sheppard, A.B., Warden and Assistant Adviser to the Fresh- 
men of Rockefeller Hall, resigned. 

Harriet Jean Crawford, A.B., appointed Warden and Assistant 
Adviser to the Freshmen of Rockefeller Hall. Miss Crawford 



93 

received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege in 1902. 

Bertha Margaret Laws, A.B., appointed Assistant to the Warden 
of Pembroke Hall. Miss Laws received the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts from Bryn Mawr College in 1901. She was Recording 
Secretary of Bryn Mawr College from 3901 to 1903 and Secre- 
tary and Teacher of Latin in the Agnes Irwin School, Philadel- 
phia, from 1903 to 1907. 

James G. Forrester, appointed Comptroller. Mr. Forrester received 
the degree of Master of Arts from the University of Edinburgh 
in 1885. He studied law at the University of Edinburgh from 
1885 to 18S9, and received the degree of Solicitor at Law. 
He was in the service of the firm of Balfour & Scott, Writers to 
the Signet, Edinburgh, from 1885 to 190-1, and of the Girard 
Trust Company, Philadelphia, from June, 1904, to December, 1906. 
He was Manager of the Imperial Trusts Company of Canada, To- 
ronto, January 1, 1907, to June 30, 1907. 

Esther Hoy Taylor, reappointed First Assistant in the Comp- 
troller's office. 

Caroline Lewis, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, resigned 
to accept the Private Secretaryship to the President. 

Alexander H. Campbell, appointed Business Manager. Mr. Campbell 
was Curator of St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., from January 
1, 18SG, to September 1, 1907. 



II. 

Fellowships and Scholarships Conferred for the Year 
1907-08. 

Virginia Geeeb Hill, Bryn Mawr European Fellow. 

Philadelphia, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. 

Alice Middleton Boeing, Mary E. Garrett European Fellow. 

Philadelphia, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904, and A.M., 1905. Graduate 
Scholar in Biology and Assistant in the Biological Laboratory, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1904-05 ; Moore Fellow in Zoology, University of Pennsylvania, 
1905-06 ; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. 

Esther Harmon, President's European Fellow. 

Toledo, O. A.B., University of Michigan, 1906 ; Graduate Scholar in Teutonic 
Philology, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. 

Anna Sophia Weusthoff, 

Special European Fellow in Teutonic Philology. 

New York City. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1906. Graduate Scholar 
in Teutonic Philology, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. 

Mary Swindler, Felloio in Greek. 

Bloomington, Ind. A.B., University of Indiana, 1905, and A.M., 1906. Grad- 
uate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. 

Lily Ross Tayloe, Fellow in Latin. 

Madison, Wis. A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1906. Graduate Scholar in 
Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. 

Rose Jeffries Peebles, Felloio in English. 

Birmingham, Ala. A.B., Mississippi State College for Women, 1891. Uni- 
versity of Chicago, summer, 1897, 1898, 1905 ; Harvard University, sum- 
mer, 1902 ; Columbia University, summer, 1903 ; Bryn Mawr College, 
1906-07. 

Flobence Donnell White, Fellow in French. 

Bangor, Me. A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1903, and A.M., 1907. Student, 
University of Paris, 1903-04. Graduate Scholar in Romance Languages, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. 

Mabgaeet Shoee Mobeiss, Fellow in History. 

Baltimore, Md. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1904. Holder of 
Foundation Scholarship, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-06. London School of 
Economics, and Research Student at the Public Record Office, London, 
1906-07. 

Elva Cooper, Fellow in Mathematics. 

Milwaukee, Wis. A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1904, and A.M., 1906. Grad- 
uate Scholar in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin, and Teacher of 
Mathematics in the High School, Madison, Wis. 

Dobothy Anna Hahn, Fellow in Chemistry. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1899. Professor of Chemistry and 
Biology, Pennsylvania College for Women. Pittsburgh. Pa., 1899-1906 ; Pro- 
fessor of Biology, Kindergarten College, Pittsburgh, 1904-06 ; Student, Uni- 
versity of Leipsic, 1906-07. 

Anna Ward Aven, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Clinton, Miss. A.B., Mississippi College, 1905. Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. 

94 



95 

Maegaret Elizabeth Beusstar, . .Graduate Scholar in Mathematics. 

Birdsboro, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903. Teacher of Latin and Mathe- 
matics, Miss Gleini's School, Pittsburg, Pa., 1903-04 ; Teacher of Mathe- 
matics in the Misses Shipley's School, Br.yn Mawr, Pa., 1904-07. 

Cornelia Catlin Coulter, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Ferguson, Mo. A.B., Washington University, 1907. 

Emily C. Crawford Graduate Scholar in Greek. 

Montreal, Canada. A.B., McGill University, 1907. 

Margaret Curtis, Graduate Scholar in Spanish. 

New Haven, Conn. A.B., Smith College, 1907. 

Ruby Maud Jolliffe, Graduate Scholar in English. 

Clinton, Ont. A.B., University of Toronto, 1903. 

Helen Lamberton, Graduate Scholar in Physics. 

Philadelphia, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. 

Helen Moss Lowengrund, Graduate Scholar in English. 

Philadelphia, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1906. Holder of the Bryn Mawr 
European Fellowship, and Graduate Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 
1906-07. 

Mary Bennett McIntosh, Graduate Scholar in Greek. 

Alda, Neb. A.B., University of Nebraska, 1907. 

Mary Clarissa McKee, Graduate Scholar in Chemistry. 

Wilkinsburg, Pa. A.B., Pennsylvania College for Women, 1907. 

Louise Baggott Morgan, Graduate Scholar in English. 

Providence, R. I. A.B. and A.M., Brown University, 1907, 

Lillian Virginia Moser, .. .Graduate Scholar in Teutonic Philology. 

Syracuse, N. Y. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1893. Student of French and 
German in Paris and Hanover, 1893-94, and in the summer, 1900 and 1905 ; 
Teacher of Modern Languages in "The Seminary," Clifton Springs, N. Y., 
1894-95 ; Student of Pedagogy. State Normal College, N. Y., 1895-96. 
Pd.B., State Normal College, 1896. Teacher of French and German in the 
Granger Place School, Canandaigua, N. Y., 1896-1905 ; Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1905-07, and Teacher of German and French in Miss 
Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1905-06. 

Celia Elizabeth Newman, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Madison, Wis. A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1907. 

Helen Hawley Nichols, .... Graduate Scholar in Semitic Languages. 

Marietta, O. A.B., Marietta College, 1906. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1906-07. 

Susie McDowell Weldon Rabourn, .... Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Centralia, Mo. A.B., University of Missouri, 1902, and A.M., 1905. Graduate 
student, University of Missouri, 1904-05. 

Edith Florence Rice, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. 

Elizabeth Ellinwood Roberts, Graduate Scholar in German. 

Hartford, Conn. A.B., Western Reserve University, 1905. Graduate Scholar, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1905-06. 

Clara Lyford Smith, Graduate Scholar in Greek. 

Los Angeles, Cal. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. 

Helen Twining Smith, Graduate Scholar in Political Science. 

Havre de Grace, Ma. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. 

Helen Emma Wieand, . . .Graduate Scholar in Latin and Archaeology. 

Pottstown, Pa. A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1906. 



96 

Eleanor Densmore Wood Graduate Foundation Scholar. 

Wichita, Kan. L.B., Earlham College, 1896 ; A.B., Perm College. 1897. 
Foundation Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1897-99 ; Principal of Earlham 
Academy, Earlham, Ind., 1899-1900 ; Settlement worker, Indianapolis, Ind., 
1900-01 ; Student, University of Chicago, 1902-03 ; University of Marburg, 
Winter Semester, 1904-05 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. 

Alma Taylor Edwards, Guilford Graduate Scholar. 

Columbia, S. C. A.B., Guilford College, 1907. 

Florence Lupton Shute. Earlham Graduate Scholar. 

Richmond, Ind. A.B., Earlham College, 1907. 

Rosamond Fay Towns, Penn Graduate Scholar. 

Omaha, Neb. A.B., Penn College, 1907. 

Dorothy Martin Child, Foundation Scholar. 

Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Agnes Irwin School, Phila- 
delphia. Holder of Foundation Scholarship, 1905-07. 

Alpine Bodine Parker, Foundation Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Lydia Trimble Sharpless, .Foundation Scholar. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared by Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa., and 
by private study. Holder of Foundation Scholarship," 1905-07. 

Mary Boyd Shipley, Foundation Scholar. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr. Holder 
of Foundation Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Anne Garrett Walton, Foundation Scholar. 

Media, Pa. Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School", Westtown, Pa., and 
by private tuition. Holder of Foundation Scholarship, and of Maria Hop- 
per Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Helen Emerson,. . . .First Neiv England States Matriculation Scholar. 
Providence, R. I. Prepared by the Eincoln School, Providence. 
Charlotte Isabel Claflin, 

Second New England States Matriculation Scholar. 
Cambridge, Mass. Prepared by the Cambridge Latin School. 
Margaret Jeffreys Hobart, 

First New York and New Jersey Matriculation Scholar. 
New York City. Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. 
Mary Kilner, 

Second New York and New Jersey Matriculation Scholar. 
New York City. Prepared by the Misses Rayson's School and by the Brearley 
School, New York City. 

Angela Darkow, 

First Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar. 
New York City. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship. 

Carlotta Welles, 

Second Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar. 
Paris, France. Prepared by the Villa Dupont School, Paris, and the Bald- 
win School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Alice Eichberg, First Western States Matriculation Scholar. 

Cincinnati, O. Prepared by the Bartholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati. 

Helen Tredway, Second Western States Matriculation Scholar. 

Dubuque, la. Prepared by the High School, Dubuque. 



97 

Helen Mulleb Bley, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 

of the First (equal) Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania 

and the Southern States,, and of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School 

Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Angela Dabkow, Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of the First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and 
the Southern States, 1907-08. 

Bebtha Sophie Ehlebs, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of the First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and 
the Southern States, 1905-06 ; Holder of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High 
School Scholarship, 1905-07. 

Agnes Mellee Iewln, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Mayone Lewis, . . . Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1904-05 ; Holder 
of the James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 1905-06. 

Mabt Fbances Neaeing, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of the Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and 
the Southern States, 1905-06 ; Holder of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High 
School Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Ellen Esthee Pottbeeg, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 
Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia, 
Sarah Minieb Sanboene, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, .Philadelphia. Holder 
of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1904-07. 

Caroline Letchwoeth Justice, 

Trustees' Lower Merion High School Scholar. 

Narberth, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa. 

Anne Gaeeett Walton, James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar. 

Media, Pa. Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa., and 
by private tuition. Holder" of Foundation Scholarship, and of Maria Hop- 
per Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Ruth Anita Wade, James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar. 

Helena, Mont. Prepared by the High School, Helena. University of Chi- 
cago, 1904-06. 

Elise Donaldson, Mary E. Stevens Scholar. 

St. Denis, Md. Prepared by Flushing Seminary, Flushing, N. Y. Holder of 
Maria Hopper Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Josephine Chapin Bbown, Maria Hopper Scholar. 

Ogdensburg, N. Y. Prepared by the Ogdensburg Free Academy and by the 
Balliol School, Utica, N. Y. 



98 

Marion Shelmire Kirk, Maria Hopper Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Mayone Lewis, . . . .Maria L. Eastman Broolce Hall Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1904-07 ; Holder 
of the James B. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 1905-06. 

Jessie Jay Gilroy, L. C. B. Saul Manorial Scholar. 

Aldan, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia, Pa. Holder 
of the L. C. B. Saul Memorial Scholarship, 1905-07. 

Sidney Garrigues, Special Scholar. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Caroline Minor, Special Scholar. 

Richmond, Va. Prepared by Miss Ellett's School, Richmond. 

Margaret Ladd Franklin, Bryn Mawr School Scholar. 

Baltimore. Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the 
Southern States, 1901-02 ; Holder of Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 
1902-03, 1904-07. 

Janet Tucker Howell, Bryn Mawr School. Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Charlotte Stuart Kimball, Bryn Maicr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Elizabeth Tappan, Bryn Mawr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Grace La Pierre Wooldridge, Bryn Maior School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder 
of Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1905-07. 

Edith Adair, City Scholar. 

Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadel- 
phia. Holder of the James E. Rhoads' Sophomore Scholarship and of City 
Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Emily Edna Caskey, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Julia Chickering, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Anna Eleanor Clifton, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1905-07. 

Jessie Williams Clifton, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Irene Stauffer Eldridge, City . Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia, and by 
private study. Holder of City Scholarship, 1904-07. 

Emma Forster, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Mabel Frehafer, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1904-07. 



99 

Sarah Sanson Goldsmith, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared hv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia! Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1904-07. 

Maky Merrick Goodwin City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared hy the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship. 1905-07. 

Margaret Elizabeth Hudson, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1905-07. 

Lillie James, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared hv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Mary Anderson Kinsley, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared hy the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Marion Shelmire Kirk, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Ethel Ladd, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Dorothy Nearing, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Helen Virginia North, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1904-07. 

Eleanor Ferguson Rambo, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1904-07. 

Mary Longaker Root City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Helen Du Bois Rumrill, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1905-07. 

Nellie Marguerite Seeds, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1904-07. 

Mary Boyde Wesner, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Genevieve Wilson, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of First (equal) Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania 
and the Southern States, 1906-07 ; Holder of City Scholarship, 1906-07. 

Margaret Emerson Bailey, George W. Chiltls Prise Essayist. 

Providence, R. I. Prepared by Miss Bowen and Miss Gilman's School, Provi- 
dence, and by Miss Florence Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



III. 

Degrees Conferred during the Academic Year 1906-07. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 
1 

Hope Traver, of Connecticut. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1896. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, and Pri- 
vate Tutor, Whitford, Pa., 1901-02 ; Graduate Scholar in English, Bryn 
Mawr College, and Teacher of English in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, 
Pa., 1902-03 ; Fellow in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-04 ; Holder of the 
Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship and Student, University of Munich, 
1904-06 ; Fellow hy Courtesy and Graduate Scholar in English. Bryn Mawr 
College, Second Semester, 1905-06 ; Teacher of English in Huntington Hall, 
Los Angeles, Cal., 1906-07. Subjects : English and History. Thesis : The 
Allegory of the Four Daughters of God. 

MASTER OF ARTS. 

8 
Theodora Bates, of Massachusetts. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1905. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1905-06. 

Marianna Nicholson Buffum, of Rhode Island. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 
1906-07. 

Julia Anna Gardner, of South Dakota. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1905. Scholar in Geology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1906-07. 

Ethel Mary Bennett Hitchens, of Pennsylvania. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1905. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1906-07. 

Helen Moss Lowengrtjnd, of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1906. Bryn Mawr European Fellow and Scholar in 
Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. 

Lillian Virginia Moser, of New York. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1893. Pd.B., State Normal College, 1896. Grad- 
uate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1905-07. 

Virginia Pollard Robinson, of Kentucky. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1906. Scholar in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 
1906-07. 

Helen Estabrook Sandison, of Indiana. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1906. Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 
1906-07. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 
71 

Viola Margaret Blaisdell, of New Jersey. 

Prepared by private tuition. Group: Latin and Mathematics. The work for 
this degree was completed in February, 1907. 

Gladys Winthrop Chandler, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1902-06. George W. Childs Prize Essayist, 1906. Group : Latin 
and English. The work for this degree was completed in February, 1907. 

(100) 



101 

Emily Smyth Cooper, of New Jersey. 

Prepared by the Friends' Central School, Philadelphia. Group : History and 
Economics and Politics. The work for this degree was completed in 
February, 1907. 

Jessie Dunlap Thomas, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by Miss Florence Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private 
study. Group : German and French. The work for this degree was com- 
pleted in February, 1907. 

Catherine Merea Utley, of New York City. 

Prepared by Northfleld Seminary, East Northfield, Mass, and by private 
study. Group : Economics and Politics and Philosophy. The work for 
this degree was completed in February, 1907. 

Margaget Helen Ayer, of Chicago. 

Prepared by the University School for Girls, Chicago. Group : English and 
Philosophy. 

Margaret Emerson Bailey, of Rhode Island. 

Prepared by Miss Bowen and Miss Gilman's School, Providence, and by Miss 
Florence Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group : English and German. 

Julie De Forest Benjamin, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. Group : English and 
Philosophy. 

Grace Stanley Brownell, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City, and bv the Balliol School, 
Utica, N. Y. Group : Economics and Politics and Philosophy. 

Marian Elizabeth Bryant, of Illinois. 

Prepared by the High School, Oak Park. Group : Greek and Latin. 

Marie Rowland Bunker, of Philadephia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1903-07. Group : English and French. 

Mary Antoinette Cannon, of New York. 

Prepared by Miss Florence Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group : Chem- 
istry and Biology. 

Reglna Lucia Christy, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of Trustees' Phila- 
delphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1903-07. Group : Latin and Ger- 
man. 

Elizabeth Estelle Clark, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholarship, 
1903-07. Group : Chemistry and Biology. 

Dorothy Mayhew Craig, of New Jersey. 

Prepared by Helicon Hall, Englewood. Group : Chemistry and Biology. 

Elma Daw, of New York. 

Prepared by the Emma Willard School, Troy, N. Y. Group : History and 
Economics and Law. 

Susan Adams Delano, of New York City. 

Prepared by Miss Spence's School, New York City. Group : English and 
French. 

Comfort Worthington Dorsey, of Baltimore. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of Bryn Mawr School 
Scholarship, 1903-07. Group : Economics and Politics and Philosophy. 

Eleanor Ecob, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by Miss Case and Miss Child's School, Philadelphia. Group : Eng- 
lish and French. 



102 

Mary Huntington Fabian, of Illinois. 

Prepared by the High School, Evanston, and by private tuition. Group : 
Philosophy and Physics. 

Mary Rodgers Ferguson, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1903-07. Group : Latin and French. 

May Augusta Fleming, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Public Schools, New Britain, Conn., and by the Friends' 
School, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. Group : Latin and English. 

Dorothy Forster, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. Group : History and Eco- 
nomics and Politics. 

Mabel Foster, of Vermont. 

Prepared by the High School, Burlington, and by private tuition. Group : 
German and French. 

Augusta Graham French, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by Miss Hills's School, Philadelphia, and by private tuition. Group : 
English and Philosophy. 

Annie Ashbrook Gendell, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School. Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1903-07. Group : Latin and French. 

Alice Hill Gerhard, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the High School, and by Miss Sergeant and Miss Bent's School, 
Harrisburg. Group : English and German. 

Ellen Graves, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by Mrs. Holtum's English School for Girls, Buenos Aires, and by 
private tuition. Group : French and Italian and Spanish. 

Anna Jones Haines, of New Jersey. 

Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. Group : History 
and Economics and Politics. 

Gladys Priscilla Haines, of Nebraska. 

Prepared by the High School, Omaha, and by private tuition. Group : Latin 
and German. 

Anna Thompson Hann, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1903-07. Group : Latin and English. 

Ethel Harper, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City, and by private tuition. 
Group : Latin and French. 

Alice Martin Hawkins, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by Ehe Friends' Central School, Philadelphia. Holder of the Second 
Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the Southern 
States, 1903-04. Group : English and Philosophy. 

Blanche Hecht, of New York. 

Prepared by the High School, Rochester. Barnard College, 1903-04. Group : 
Latin and French. 

Abby Gertrude Hill, of New York. 

Prepared by the Halsted School, Yonkers. Group : Latin and French. 

Virginia Greer Hill, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Friends' Select School, Philadelphia. Group: Latin and 
Mathematics. 



103 

Brita Larsena Horner, of New Jersey. 

Prepared by the High School, Camden, N. J. Holder of the First Bryn Mawr 
Matriculation Scholarship for New York, New Jersey, and Delaware, 
1903-04 ; Holder of Maria Hopper Scholarship, 1904-05. Group : Greek and 
Latin. 

Grace Hutchins, of Boston. 

Prepared by Miss Folsom's School, Boston. Group : English and Philosophy. 

Katharine Kerr, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City, and by private tuition. 
Group : Latin and French. 

Jeannette Cascaden Klatjder, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by Miss Case and Miss Child's School, Philadelphia, Pa. Group : 
English and French. 

Helen Lamberton, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School. Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1903-07. Group : Mathematics and Physics. 

JUSTINA LORENZ, of Ohio. 

Prepared by the Steele High School, Dayton, and by private tuition. Group : 
History and Economics and Politics. 

Winifred Matheson, of Montana. 

Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1901-03 ; Wellesley College, 1903-04. 
Group : English and French. 

Ida Catharine Mc Williams, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by Miss Florence Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group : 
Mathematics and Chemistry. 

Margaret Baker Morison, of New York City. 

Prepared by Packer Collegiate Institute, Brooklyn. Group : German and 
English. 

Brownie Elizabeth Neff, of Virginia. 

Prepared by the High School, Harrisonburg, and by private tuition. Group : 
Latin and Mathematics. 

Mary Isabelle O'Sullivan, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholarship, 
1903-07. Group : Greek and Mathematics. 

Gabriella Brooke Forman Peters, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Misses Rayson's School, New York City. Holder of the 
Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for New York, New Jersey, 
and Delaware, 1903-04. Group : Latin and English. 

Elizabeth Bogman Pope, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by the High School, Newburyport. Group : English and French. 

Margaret Putnam, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. Group : Chemistry and 
Biology. 

Margaret Morris Reeve, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa., ana by the 
Friends' Select School, Germantown. Holder of Foundation Scholarship, 
1903-07. Group : .Chemistry and Biology. 

Esther Meredith Reinhardt, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by private tuition. Hearer, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-04. Group : 
English and French. 

Edith Florence Rice, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of Trustees' Phila- 
delphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1903-07. Group : Latin and Ger- 



104 

Annabella Elliott Richards, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by Miss Hills's School, Philadelphia. Group : Chemistry and 
Biology. 

Bertha Rosenheimer, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by private tuition. Group : Latin and French. 

Eunice Morgan Schenk, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Packer Collegiate Institute, Brooklyn. Group : English and 
French. 

Harriet Frances Seaver, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. Group : Latin and Italian 
and Spanish. 

Clara Lyford Smith, of California. 

Prepared by the High School, Los Angeles. Holder of the First Bryn Mawr 
Matriculation Scholarship for the Western States, 1903-04 ; Holder of the 
James B. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 1904-05 ; Holder of the Maria L. 
Eastman Brooke Hall Memorial Scholarship, 1906-07. Group : Greek and 
Latin. 

Helen Twining Smith, of Maryland. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Group : History and Econom- 
ics and Politics. 

Helen Pugh Smitheman, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1903-07. Group : Latin and Mathematics. 

Suzette Kemper Grundy Stuart, of New York City. 

Prepared by Packer Collegiate Institute, Brooklyn. Holder of the Second 
Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for New York, New Jersey, and 
Delaware, 1902-03. Group : German and French. 

Emma Sweet, of Kansas. 

Prepared by the Collegiate Institute for Girls, Philadelphia, Pa., and by 
private tuition. Holder of Maria Hopper Scholarship, 1904-05 ; Holder 
of the James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship, 1905-06 ; Holder of the 
Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Scholarship, 1906-07. Group, History and Eco- 
nomics and Politics. 

Ellen Thayer, of New York. 

Prepared by Flushing Seminary, and by private tuition. Group : Latin and 
French. 

Elizabeth Taylor Thompson, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1903-07. Group : English and Philosophy. 

Elsie Amelia Wallace, of Colorado. 

Prepared by Miss Florence Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private 
tuition. Group, German and French. 

Esther Williams, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by Miss Brown and Miss Owen's School, Boston, Mass., and by 
Milton Academy. Group : English and Philosophy. 

Letitia Butler Windle, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by Mrs. Robins's School, West Chester, and by Miss Florence Bald- 
win's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group : Latin and Mathematics. 

Agnes Mary Winter, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by All Saints' School, Germantown. Group : History and Economics 
and Politics. 

Emma Carola Woerishoffer, of New York City. 

Prepared by private tuition. Group : Economics and Politics and Philosophy. 
Lelia T. Woodruff, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the High School, Scranton. Group : Mathematics and Physics. 
Rose Young, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Misses Rayson's School, New York City. Group : German 
and French. 



IV. 

College Preachers for the Year 1906-07. 

October 3rd— Professor George A. Barton. 

October 17th — The Rev. Robert Ellis Thompson, Ph.D., S.T.D., Prin- 
cipal of the Boys' Central High School of Philadelphia. 

October 31st— The Rev. Floyd W. Tomkins, S.T.D., Rector of Holy 
Trinity Church, Philadelphia. 

November 14th — The Rev. Oliver Huckle, D.D., Pastor of the Asso- 
ciate Congregational Church of Baltimore. 

December 12th— The Rev. John P. Peters, Ph.D., Sc.D., D.D., Rector 

of St. Michael's Episcopal Cburch, New York City. 

January 9th — The Right Rev. William Netlson McVickab, S.T.D., 
Bishop of Rhode Island. 

February 6th — The Rev. Robert Elliott Speer, Secretary of the 
Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions. 

February 20th — The Rev. John Watson, D.D. (Ian MacLaren). 

March 6th — Professor Rufus M. Jones of Haverford College. 

March 20th — The Rev. Charles R. Erdman, D.D., Professor of Prac- 
tical Theology in the Princeton Theological Seminary. 

April 17th — The Rev. Hugh Black, M.A., Jesup Graduate Professor 
of Practical Theology in the Union Theological Seminary. 

May 1st — The Rev. Wilton Merle-Smith, D.D., Pastor of the Central 
Presbyterian Church, New York City. 

May 15th — The Rev. David McConnell Steele, D.D., Rector of St. 
Luke's Epiphany Church, Philadelphia. 

June 2nd— The Rev. Samuel McCobd Crothers, D.D., Litt.D., Pastor 
of the First Parish Church, Cambridge, Mass. (Baccalaureate 
Sermon.) 



(105) 



V. 

Addresses Given Daring the Year 1906-07. 

Commencement Address. 

His Excellency the British Ambassador, the Honorable James 
Bkyce, "Has the Education of Women Distinctive Aims." 

Founder's Lecture. 

Colonel Thomas Wentworth Higginson, "Whittier's Spiritual 
Message to the World." 

College Lectures. 

Professor Eugen Kuhhemakn of the University of Breslau, 
"Gerhart Hauptmann." Lecture delivered in German. 

Miss Florence Farr of London, "Reading of Greek Choruses 
and Lyric Poetry." 

Mrs. Charles Park, President of the Boston Branch of the Col- 
lege Equal Suffrage League, and Founder of the League, 
"Woman Suffrage." 

Professor Anatole le Braz, Professor of French and Celtic 
Literature in the University of Rennes, La Renaissance Cel- 
tique en Europe; son histoire, ses caracteres, son influence. 
Lecture delivered in French. 

Dr. Gilbert Murray, sometime Professor of Greek in the Uni- 
versity of Glasgow, Fellow of New College, Oxford, "Begin- 
nings in Greece," and "Greek Tragedy." 

Before the Christian Union. 

Mr. Harry Wade Hicks, "Missions." 
Miss Janet McCook. 

Mr. J. Harrington Littell of the Episcopal Board of Foreign 
Missions, "Missions in China." 
The Rev. David McConnell Steele, D.D., Rector of St. Luke's Epi- 
phany Church, Philadelphia. 
The Rev. Floyd W. Tomkins, D.D., Rector of Holy. Trinity 

Church, Philadelphia. 
The Rev. John Timothy Stone, D.D. of Baltimore. 
Miss Ume Tsuda, "Miss Tsuda's School in Japan." 

106 



107 

Before the College Equal Suffrage Chapter. 

Lady Mary Murray, "Women Suffrage in England." 

Before the Consumers' League. 

Mrs. Frederick Nathan, "Education and the Social Conscience." 
Miss Florence Sanville, Executive Secretary of the Consumers' 
League of Philadelphia, "The Consumers' League." 

Before the English Club. 

Mr. Hammond Lamont, . Associate Editor of The Nation, "The 

Daily in a Democracy." 
Dr. Harold de W. Fuller, of Harvard University, "Shakespeare's 

Inheritance." 

Before the German Club. 

Dr. Karl Detlev Jessen, "The Influence of Scandinavian Liter- 
ature on German Literature." 

Before the Graduate Club. 

President M. Carey Thomas, "Equal Suffrage." 

Mrs. Francis Greenleaf Allinson, "Greece and her Founda- 
tions." 

Dr. Jeremiah Jenks of Cornell University, "The Amassing and 
Spending of Great Fortunes." 

Professor William B. Huff, "Some Recent Discoveries in 
Physics." 

Professor Felix Schelling of the University of Pennsylvania, 
"The Pedigree of the Elizabethan Drama." 

Before the Law Club. 

Dr. Frank J. Goodnow of Columbia University, "The Place of 
the Political Party in the American System of Government." 

Judge James McKeen, "Some Phases of Penal Law." 

Mr. Hampton L. Carson, Ex- Attorney General, "Reforms in Eng- 
lish Criminal Jurisprudence." 

Before the League for the Service of Christ. 

Dr. Samuel Zwemer. 

Miss Mary Sanford, Religious Work Secretary of the New York 
State Committee of the Young Women's Christian Association. 



108 

Miss Dorothea Day, Bryn Mawr, 1903. 
Miss Kathbina Van Wagenen, Bryn Mawr, 1904. 
Miss Margaret Shearman, Bryn Mawr, 1895. 
Miss Edith Crane, Bryn Mawr, 1900. 
Miss Louise Holmquist, Vassar, 1901. 
Dr. Alfred Garrett. 

The Rev. C. A. R. Janvier, Pastor of the Holland Memorial 
Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia. 

Before the Oriental Club. 

Dr. A. V. Williams-Jackson of Columbia University, "Early 
Drama in India with Parallels from Shakespeare." 

Dr. Albert T. Clay of the University of Pennsylvania, "Recent 
Explorations in Babylonia." 

Dr. Elihu Grant of Boston University, Missionary from Pales- 
tine, "Village Life in Palestine." 

Mrs. Cobnelius Stevenson, "Recent Finds in Egypt." 

Before the Philosophical Club. 

Db. Nobman Smith of Princeton University, "A Defence of Bal- 
four's Principles of Philosophic Doubt." 

De. Geobge Malcolm Steatton, Professor of Experimental 
Psychology at Johns Hopkins University, "Optimism and the 
Scientific Method." 

Me. Wilmon H. Sheldon of Princeton University, "Abstract 
Ideals and Human Progress." 

Before the Science Club. 

Peofessob Thomas Hunt Moegan of Columbia University, 
"Heredity in Colour." 

Peofessob Edwaed Beadfoed Tichenee, Sage Professor of Psy- 
chology in Cornell University, "The Psychology of Smell." 

ENTERTAINMENTS. 

For the Benefit of the Alumnce Endoivment Fund. 
Performance of "Pyramis and Thisbe." 

For the Benefit of the Students' Building Fund. 

Performance of "The Tempest," by Mr. Ben Greet's Company. 



V3L 

Gifts Received by the College During the Year 1906-07. 

Our sincere gratitude is due for the following gifts which, 
have been received during the past year, in addition to gifts 
of special books to the library which are enumerated arjd 
acknowledged in the report of the Librarian : 

From the Alumnse Association of the Girls' High and 
Normal School, Philadelphia, for the L. C. B. Saul Memo- 
rial Scholarship, $100. 

From an anonymous donor, towards academic salaries, 
$500. 

From three anonymous donors for travelling research 
fellowship, $500. 

From the Athletic Association, for concreting lower ath- 
letic field, $325. 

From the Athletic Association, supplementary gift to 
complete upper hockey field, $41.74. 

From the Board of Education of the City of Philadel- 
phia for City Scholarships, $2,700. 

From the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md., for Bryn 
Mawr School Scholarships, $2,400. 

From the Class of 1896, a marble bench placed at the 
end of the maple avenue in memory of Mary Helen Ritchie. 

From the Class of 1901, for a fountain in the library 
cloister garden, $1,000. 

From Mr. Isaac H. Clothier, fifty shares of the stock 
of the Bryn Mawr Hotel Company. Nominal value, $5,000. 

From Mr. Albert J. Edmunds, Secretary of the His- 
torical Society of Pennsylvania, his library, containing about 
500 volumes, on the condition that it should be kept together 
during his lifetime in order that he might use it ; and that the 
unused or slightly bound matter, such as the Pali texts, should 
not be taken from the library. 

(109) 



110 

Prom Miss Mary E. Garrett for fellowships and grad- 
uate scholarships, $4,700 ; for competitive entrance scholar- 
ships, $1,612.50 ; for apparatus in physical chemistry, 
$1,000 ; for psychological apparatus, $600 ; for art and archae- 
ology, $500; for scientific journals, $508.93; for publica- 
tion of college monographs, $553.03 ; for pen and ink sketches 
of college buildings to be reproduced for the program, 
$276.27; for the purchase of books for the library, $231.39; 
for annual subscriptions to the American School of Classical 
Studies at Athens and at Rome, Marine Biological Laboratory 
at Wood's Holl, and Woman's Table at Naples, $650. 

From Miss Frances Appleton Jackson, competitive En- 
trance Scholarship returned to Scholarship Fund, $200. 

From Miss Elma Loines, for physical apparatus, $25. 

From Mrs. Rebecca C. Longstreth, of Haverford, Pa., 
to the Library, a copy of "The Holy Bible, Translated from 
the Greek by Charles Thompson, late Secretary of the Con- 
gress of the United States, and John Aitkin, 1808," four 
volumes. 

From the Rev. Wilton Merle Smith, for Scholarship 
Fund, $50. 

From a "Friend," for mathematical models and books, 
$500. 

From Mrs. Charles Roberts, for subscription to the 
American School of Oriental Study and Research in Pales- 
tine, $100. 

From Mr. David Scull, $205; from Mr. Justus C. 
Strawbridge, $200 ; from Mr. Asa S. Wing, $50 ; from Mr. 
Joshua L. Baily, $25, and from Mr. George Wood, $20, 
forming a fund of $500 for the purchase of books for the 
department of Semitic Languages and Biblical Literature. 

From the Society of Colonial Dames of America, a 
tablet in memory of Elizabeth Duane Gillespie, placed on 
the wall of the cloister of the Library. 

From Miss Elma Loines, Class of 1905, for physical 
apparatus, $100. 

From Denbigh Hall Warden's Fund, for tiling of vesti- 
bule, $88.69. 



Ill 

From Pembroke Hall Warden's Fund, for tiling of 
Pembroke East and West vestibules, $192.05 

From Mrs. Anna WoerishofTer, for a travelling Euro- 
pean Fellowship, $500 ; for books on German literature, $200. 

From the class of 1897, for leaded glass window in 
Pembroke Hall, $50. 

From President M. Carey Thomas, for office salaries, 
$841.72. 

From the Undergraduate Association and Graduate 
Club, the David Irons Memorial Library of 541 volumes. 

From Mrs. Anna Woerishoffer, of JSTew York City, on 
April 1, 1907, the birthday of her mother, the late Anna 
Ottendorfer, one hundred shares of United States Steel pre- 
ferred stocks, of the par value of $10,000, now yielding 7 per 
cent, the income of which is to be used annually for a 
travelling research fellowship in Teutonic philology and 
German to be named in memory of her mother, the Anna 
Ottendorfer Memorial Research Fellowship in Teutonic Phil- 
ology and German. 



VII. 

Titles of Scientific Publications of the Faculty which ap- 
peared in the Year 1906-07. 

Dr. Charles McLean Andrews. 

"Some Neglected Aspects of Colonial History." Pro- 
ceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, pp. 1-20, 
Paterson, K J., 1906. 

Dr. George A. Barton, 

"Palestine Before the Coming of Israel." The Biblical 
World, Vol. 28, pp. 360-373, December, 1906. 

"Three Objects from the Collection of Mr. Herbert 
Clark in Jerusalem." Journal of the American Oriental- 
Society, Vol. 27, pp. 400-402. 

Review of "The Babylonian Expedition of the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, Series A: Cuneiform Texts, Vol. 6, 
Pt. 1, Babylonian Legal and Business Documents from the 
time of the First Dynasty of Babylon (chiefly from Sip- 
par)," by Hermann Ranke. Bibliotheca Sacra, Vol. 64, pp 
588-591, July, 1907. 

Review of "The Babylonian Expedition of the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, Series A: Cuneiform Texts, Vol. 20, 
Pt. 1 : Mathematical, Metrological, and Chronological Tab- 
lets from the Temple Library of Nippur," by H. V. Hil- 
precht. Philadelphia Public Ledger, Vol. 144, No. 147, p. 
6, February 18, 1907. 

Review of Houghton's "Hebrew . Life and Thought." 
The Biblical World. Vol. 29, pp. 723-724, June, 1907. 

Review of Jensen's "Das Gilgamesch-Epos in der Welt- 
literatur." The American Journal of Theology, Vol. 11, 
pp. 519-524, July, 1907. 

Review of Jordon's "Comparative Religion, its Genesis 
and Growth." The Biblical World, Vol. 28, pp. 285-287, 
October, 1906. 

(112) 



113 

Review of Kent's "Origin and Permanent Value of 
the Old Testament." The Biblical World, Vol. 29, pp. 724- 
725, June, 1907. 

Review of Schmidt's "Prophet of Nazareth." The In- 
ternational Journal of Ethics, Vol. 17, pp. 110-120, October, 
1906. 

Dr. Florence Bascom, 

"Anhydritzwilling von Aussee." By F. Bascom and 
V. Goldschmidt. Zeitschrift fur Krystallographie una 7 Min- 
eralogie, Vol. 44, Pt. 1, p. 65-68, 1907. 

The same. The American Journal of Science, Vol. 24, 
pp. 487-491, December, 1907. 

Dr. Carleton F. Brown, 

"The Autobiographical Element in the Cynewulfian 
Rune Passages." Englische Studien, Vol. 38, pp. 196-233, 
September, 1907. 

Miss Rose Chamberlin, 

A Scheme of German Nouns and Verbs. Edition 5. 
Revised. 

Dr. Hermann Collitz, 

"Segimer oder Germanische Namen in Keltischem 
Gewande." Journal of English and Germanic Philology, 
Vol. 6, No. 2, pp. 253-306, 1907. 

A review of Gallee's "Vorstudien zu einem Altnieder- 
deutschen Worterbuche." Journal of English and Germanic 
Philology, Vol. 6, No. 3, pp. 472-477, 1907. 

M. Lucien Foulet, 

"Un Emprunt de Ronsard a, Rabelais." Revue d'His- 
toire Litteraire de la France, January-March, 1907, pp. 
134-135. 

"Le Prologue du 'Franklin's Tale' et les Lais bretons." 
Zeitschrift fur Bomanische Philologie, Vol. 31, Pt. 6, pp. 
698-711, November, 1906. 

Dr. Tenney Frank. 

"Csesar at the Rubicon." Classical Quarterly, Vol. 1, 
pp. 223-225, July, 1907. 



114 

"Construction of Indirect Discourse in Germanics." 
Journal of English and Germanic Philology , Vol. VII, pp. 
68-84. 

"Latin vs. Germanic Modal Conceptions." American 
Journal of Philology, Vol. XXVIII, No. 3, pp. 273-286. 
1907. 

"Question of Poetic Diction in Latin Verse." Classical 
Journal, Vol. II, pp. 323-329. 

"Semantics of Modal Constructions." First paper, 
Classical Philology, Vol. II, pp. 163-186. April, 1907. 

Review of Bennett's "The Latin Language." Classical 
Weekly, Vol. I, pp. 100-101. 

Dr. Orie Latham Hatcher, 

"The Sources of Fletcher's Monsieur Thomas." Anglia, 
pp. 89-102, February, 1907. 

Dr. Richard Thayer Holbrook. 
Eight reviews of books in The Nation. 

Dr. Elmer P.-Kohler, 

"Reactions between Unsaturated Compounds and Or- 
ganic Magnesium Compounds." 

IX. "Reactions with Stereoisomers." American Chem- 
ical Journal, Vol. 36, pp. 177-195. 

X. "Reaction with a-Methylcinnamic Esters." Ibid., 
Vol. 36, pp. 529-538. 

XL "Cyclic Ketones." Ibid., Vol. 37, pp. 369-392. 

Dr. James H. Leuba. 

"Religion as a Factor in the Struggle for Life." Amer- 
ican Journal of Religious Psychology and Education, Vol. II, 
pp. 307-343. 1907. 

Reviews and short communications in the Psychological 
Bulletin and in the Sociological Review. 

Dr. Benjamin Le Roy Miller, 

"The Mineral Resources of Calvert County, Mary- 
land." The Calvert County Report of the Maryland Geo- 
logical Survey, pp. 123-134, Baltimore, March, 1907. 



115 

"The Mineral Resources of St. Mary's County, Mary- 
land." The St. Mary's County Report of the Maryland 
Geological Survey, pp. 113-124, Baltimore, March, 1907. 

Reviews of American Geographical Literature. i6e 
Bibliographie Geographique Annuelle, Annates de Geog- 
raphie, September 15, 1907. 

"The Patuxent Folio," being Folio 152 of the Geo- 
logic Atlas of the United States by Benjamin Le Roy Mil- 
ler, George Burbank Shattuck and A. Bibbins. United 
States Geological Survey, Washington, 1907. 

Dr. Harriet Randolph, 

"English Sparrows and Electric Lights." Bird Lore, 
1 p. May, June, 1907. 

Miss Helen Schaeifer, 

"Salze der seltenen Erden in verschiedenen Losungs- 
mitteln." Physikalische Zeitschrift, No. 22, pp. 822-831, 
November, 1906. 

Dr. Albert Schinz. 

"L'Art de Gautier de Coincy." Publications of the 
Modern Language Association, September, 1907. 

"Selections from Maupassant," pp. xvii, 144. Ginn & 
Co., New York, 1906. 

"Madame Recamier in the light of new documents." 
The Bookman, April, 1907. 

"Jules Lemaitre versus Democracy." The Bookman, 
September, 1907. 

Dr. William Roy Smith. 

"Recent Studies in English Political Biography." Put- 
nam's Monthly, Vol. II, pp. 360-366, June, 1907. 

Review of Paul's "A History of Modern England," 
Vols. IV and V. Political Science Quarterly, Vol. XXII, 
pp. 129-133, March, 1907. 

Dr. Nettie Maria Stevens, 

"Color Inheritance and Sex Inheritance in Certain 
Aphids." Science, N. S., Vol. 26, No. 659, 2 pp., August 
16, 1907. 



116 

"A Histological Study of Regeneration in Planaria sim- 
plicissma, Planaria maculata and Planaria morgani." By N. 
M» Stevens, E. B. O'Neil, M. J. Hogue, and M. A. Cannon. 
Archiv. f. Entwickelungsmechanik der Organismen, Bd. 24, 
Hft. 2, 24 pp, 3 double pi. August, 1907. 

"Studies in Spermatogenesis. Part II. A Compara- 
tive Study of the Heterochromosomes in certain Species of 
Coleoptera Hemiptera and Lepidoptera with especial ref- 
erence to Sex Determination." Carnegie Institution of 
Washington, Pub. No. 36, Ft. 2, 74 pp., 8 pi. Washington, 
October, 1906. 

Dr. David Hilt Tennent, 

"Further Studies on the Parthenogenetic Development 
of the Starfish Egg." The Biological Bulletin, Vol. 13, 8 
pp., 1907. 

"A Study of the Life-history of the Bucephalus Haime- 
anus." The Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science, 
Vol. 49, 56 pp., 4 pL, 1906. 

"Studies on the Development of the Starfish Egg," by 
D. H. Tennent and M. J. Hogue. The Journal of Experi- 
mental Zoology, Vol. 3, 2 pp., 25 pi., 1906. 

Mr. J. Edmund Wright, 

"Lines of Curvature of a Surface." American Journal 
of Mathematics, Vol. 29, No. 3, pp. 295-304, July, 1907. 

"The Ovals of the Plane Sextic Curve." American 
Journal of Mathematics, Vol. 29, No. 3, pp. 305-308, July, 
1907. 

"Double Points of Unicursal Curves." Bulletin of the 
American Mathematical Society, Ser. 2, Vol. XIII, No. 8, 
pp. 389-391, May, 1907. 

Dr. Wilmer Cave Wright, 

"A Short History of Greek Literature from Homer to 
Julian," 543 pp. American Book Company, New York, 
Cincinnati, Chicago, 1907. 

Eifty-six reviews of books chiefly in The Nation. 



117 



VIII. 

Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 1906-07- 



Department 



Sanskrit. 
Greek.... 



Latin 



English. 



Course 



Graduate Courses 
Sanskrit, advanced 
Elementary Greek, Grammar, 

Composition, and Reading. 

Homer, minor 

Plato, minor 

Euripides, minor 

Greek Prose Composition, 

minor 

Lectures on the History of 

Greek Literature, major. . 

Demosthenes, major 

Aristophanes major 

Thucydides, major 

Sophocles, major 

iEschylus, post-major 

Pindar, post-major 

Aristophanes, post-major. . . 
Sophocles, post -major 



Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Attic Orators . 

Livy and Composition, minor 

Cicero and Composition, minor 

Horace, minor , 

Lectures on the History of 
Latin Literature, major. . 

Tacitus, major. ........... 

Latin Comedy, major 

Roman Elegy, post-major. 

Roman Epic, post-major. . , 

Seneca, post-major. ....... 

Pliny, Letters, Martial, post- 
major. 

Vergil, post-major 

Latin Prose Composition, 
post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Roman Elegy. . . . 

Seminary in Roman History. . 

Lectures on the History of 
English Language and An- 
glo-Saxon Literature, re- 
quired 

Lectures on the History of 
English Literature _ to the 

Death of Spenser, required .... 

Principles of Articulation re- 
quired 

Principles of Pronunciation . . 

English Composition and Rhe- 
toric required, first year. . . . 



Lectures on the History of 
English Literature from the| 
Death of Spenser to the 
Restoration, required I 

Sonant Properties of Speech,' 
required \ 



Instructor 



Dr. Collitz 



Miss Kirk 
Dr. Sanders 



Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders 



Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Frank 

Dr. Wheeler 

Dr. Frank 



Dr. » heeler 
Dr. Frank 



Miss Donnelly 



Mr. Kins 



Miss Donnelly 
Miss Hoyt, 

Dr. Crandall, 
Miss Lord, 

Dr. Hatcher, 
Miss King 



Miss Donnelly 
Mr. King 



Hours 
Weekly 



.2*. 
• 2*. 



No. in Class 



.2*. 

. i. 



1st 
Sem. 



r,o 



.99. 



.98. 



.92. 
.90. 



2nd 
Sem. 



.100. 



..97. 



.94. 



..89. 
..87. 



118 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 1906-07 

continued. 



Department 



German. 



Course 



Instructor 



English Composition, required, 
second year 



English Critics of the Nine- 
teenth Century, minor 

English Poetry, minor 

Anglo-Saxon Grammar and 
Reading, minor 

Critical Reading of Shakes- 
peare, minor 

Classical and Romantic Prose, 
major 

English Letter Writers, free 
elective 

Early English Drama, free 
elective 

Fiction in the Nineteenth Cen- 
tury, free elective 

Argumentation, free elective. 

Descriptive and Narrative 
Writing, free elective 

Advanced Descriptive and 
Narrative Writing, free elec- 
tive 

General Reading of Prose Au- 
thors, free elective 



Graduate Courses 
Seminary in English Litera- 
ture 

Middle English Seminary 

Beowulf 

Beowulf 

English Journal Club 

Elementary German, Gram- 
mar and Translation 

Lectures on the History of Ger- 
man Literature from the 
earliest times to the time of 
Klopstock, exclusive, minor 

German Critical Reading, 
Grammar and Prose Com- 
position, minor 

Lectures on the History of Ger 
man Literature from Klop- 
stock to the present time, 
and Selected Reading.major 

German Reading, Faust, Part 
ii., major 

German Prose Composition, 
major 

German Literature from 1850 
to the present time and Crit- 
ical Reading, post-major.. . 

German Syntax and Composi 
tion, post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in German Litera 
ture 



Miss Donnelly, 

Miss Fullerton, 

Dr. Crandall, 

Miss Lord, 

Dr. Hatcher, 

Miss King 

Dr. Long 
Miss Donnelly 

Dr. Brown 



Dr. Long 

Miss Donnelly 

Dr. Brown 

Dr. Long 
Miss Hoyt 

Miss Fullerton 



Mr. King 



Dr. Long 
Dr .Brown 



Dr. Brown and 

Dr. Long 

Miss Chamber 

lin 



Dr. Collitz 
Dr. Jessen 

Dr. Jessen 
Dr. Collitz 
Dr. Jessen 



Dr. Jessen 
Miss Chamber 
lin 



Dr. Jessen 



Goethe's Weltanschauung. 
Germanic Antiquities. . . . 



Hours 
Weekly 



. .2 
.. .3. 



No. in Class 



1st 
Sem. 



.. .2. . 


. .91. . 


. .88. . 


.. .3.. 


..26.. 


..26.. 


.. .2.. 






.. .2. . 


. .11. . 


. . 9. . 


.. .3.. 


..15.. 


..16.. 


.. .3.. 






.. .1.. 






. . .1. . 


. . 2. . 


. . 3. . 


.. .2.. 


..25.. 


..19. . 


. . .2. . 


. . 4. . 


. . 4. . 


.. .2. . 


. .12. . 


. . 9. . 


. . .2. . 


. . 5. . 


. . 4. . 


.. .1.. 




. . 4.. 



.20. 

.24. 



.10. 
. 9. 
. 9. 



119 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 190G-07 

continued. 





Course 


Instructor 


Hours 
Weekly 


No. IN 


Class 


Department 


1st 
Sem. 


2d 

Sem. 


Teutonic 


Graduate Courses 
Introduction to Teutonic Phil- 


Dr. Collitz 

Dr. Schinz 
M. Foulet 
Dr. Schinz 

M. Foulet 

Dr. Schinz 

M. Foulet 

Dr. Schinz 
Dr. Holbrook 

M. Foulet 
Dr. DeHaan 

Dr. Schinz 
Dr. Holbrook 
Dr. Holbrook 

Dr. DeHaan 
Dr. Barton 

Dr. Andrews 
Dr. Smith 


.. .1.. 
.. .2. . 
.. .2.. 
.. .1. . 


..3.. 

. . 4. . 
.. 3. . 
. . 2. . 


. . 3. . 






..4.. 
.. 3. . 






. . 2. . 






. . .1. . 


. . 1. . 


. . 1. . 




Elementary French Grammar 


. . .5. . 


.. 4. . 


. . 6. . 




History of French Literature, 


.. .3.. 

.. .3.. 
.. .2. . 

.. .2. . 


..37.. 

..26.. 
..22.. 

. . 5. - 


..32. . 




French Reading and Composi- 






History of French Literature, 


. .26. . 




French Reading and Cornposi- 


..26. . 




The French Novel, post-major 
French Lyric Poetry, post- 


. . 7.. 




Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Modern French 


.. .3.. 

.. .1.. 
.. .1.. 
.. .2.. 
.. .1. . 


.. 3. 

..4.. 
.. 3. . 
..3.. 
. . 4. . 


. . 3. . 




Seminary in Old French Liter- 


.. 5. . 




Old French Philology 

Old French Readings 

Romance Languages, Journal 
Club 


..3.. 
..3.. 

.. 4. . 




.. .1. . 


. . 5. . 








. . 4. . 


Italian 


.. .3.. 
.. .2. . 


..28.. 
. .18. . 


..21. . 




Italian Masterpieces, minor. . 
Italian Influences on English 


. . 5. . 




.. .1. . 


..11. . 


.. 6. . 


Spanish. ...... 


.. .5.. 
.. .2.. 
.. .2.. 
.. .1.. 
.. .2. . 


..4.. 
.. 2. . 
..5.. 
..3.. 

.. 2. . 


.. 4. . 




Spanish Literature, major. . . . 
Spanish Composition, major. . 


.. 2.. 
..5.. 
.. 4.. 
.. 3. . 




Graduate Courses 


.. .2. . 
. . .2. . 


.. 1.. 
. . 1. . 


. . 1. . 






. . 1. . 


Semitic Lan- 
guages and 
Biblical, Lit- 


History of Christian Doctrine, 


.. .5.. 

.. .2.. 

.. .1.. 

.. .1.. 
...1.. 

.. .1. . 
.. .2. . 


..10.. 

..20.. 

..10.. 

.. 2. . 
.. 1.. 
.. 1.. 

. . 2. . 


..15.. 
. . 30 . . 


erature .... 


New testament Canon, free 


. .12. . 




Graduate Courses 

New Testament Seminary . . . 


..3.. 
.. 1. . 






. . 1. . 






.. 2. . 






. . .1. . 


.. 1. . 


.. 1. . 




Comparative Semitic Gram- 


.. .1.. 


.. 1.. 


.. 1. . 






..2.. 


History 


History of Europe to the period 
of the Renaissance, minor. . 

History of Europe from the 
Renaissance to the close of 
the Religious Wars, minor. . 


..71.. 



120 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 1906-07 

continued. 



Department 



Economics 
and Politics 



Philosophy... 



Course 



Modern History, from the 
Treaty of Westphalia to the 
close of the Napoleonic Cam- 
paigns, major 

Modern History, from the Con- 
gress of Vienna to the pres- 
ent time, major 

English Constitutional His- 
tory, post-major. 

American Constitutional His- 
tory, post-major. . , 

Graduate Courses 

Historical Method and Crit- 
icism 



Instructor 



History of the Community in 
England and America 

American Colonies in the Sev- 
enteenth Century 

Slavery Question in American 
Politics 

Seminary 



Introduction to Economics, 
minor 

Applied Economics, minor. . . 

Applied Economics, major.. . . 

Theoretical Economics, major 

Theories of Socialism, post- 
major 



History of Philosophy, re- 
quired 

History of Philosophy, re- 
quired, (Continued) 

Psychology, required 

Problems inMetaphysics, min- 



Ethics, minor 

Empiricism and Rationalism, 

major 

Empiricism and Rationalism, 

major, (Continued) _ 

Psychology, minor and major 
Types of Metaphysical Theory 

post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Ethical Seminary 

Metaphysics 

; Metaphysical Seminary. . . 

Psychology Seminary 

Psychology Journal Club . . 



Education. . . 

History of 
Art and 
Classical 
Archaeol- 
ogy 



History of Education, free 
elective 



Early Christian, Mediaeval 
and Renaissance Archi- 
tecture and Sculpture, free 
elective 

Greek and Roman Vases, free 
elective 

Greek and Roman Archi- 
tecture, free elective 

Greek Myths, free elective .... 

Graduate Courses 

Archaeological Seminary 

Archaeological Journal Club . . 



Dr. Smith 
Dr. Andrews 

Dr. Smith 
Dr. Andrews 



Dr. Smith 
Dr. Andrews 
and Dr. Smith 

Dr. Mussey 



Dr. Irons 

Dr. Whitney 

Dr. Leuba 

Dr. Whitney 



Dr. Irons 
Dr. Whitney 

Dr. Leuba 

Dr. Whitney 

Dr. Irons 
Dr. Whitney 

Dr. Leuba 
Dr. Leuba 



Dr. Ransom 



Hours 
Weekly 



.5.. 
.5.. 
.5.. 
.5.. 



.3.. 

.2.. 



.3 

• H. 
.3.. 
.3 
.1 



.2.. 
.1 



No. in Class 



1st 
Sem. 



.25. 



.53. 
'.'22'. 



.107. 



.93. 
.22. 



.14. 



.28. 

. 4. 

. 2. 
. 2 
. 1. 
. 4. 
. 4. 



.28. 



.11. 

. 7. 



121 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 1906-07 

continued. 



Department 


Course 


Instructor 


No. in Class 

Hours 

Weekly 1st 2nd 
Sem. Sem. 


Mathematics . 


Trigonometry, free elective. . 

Geometrical Conies, free elec- 
tive 

Analytical Conies and Theory 
of Equations, minor 

Algebra and Elementary Dif- 
ferential and Integral Cal- 
culus, minor 

Differential and Integral Cal- 
culus, Differential Equa- 
tions and Theory of Equa- 


Mr. Wright 
Dr. Scott 

Mr. Wright 

Dr. Scott 

Mr. Wright 

Dr. Scott 

Mr. Wright 

Dr. Scott and 

Mr. Wright 

Dr. Huff 

Dr. Barnes 
Dr. Huff and 
Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Huff 

Dr. Huff and 

Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Huff 
Dr. Huff and 
Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Kohler 

Dr. Horn 

Dr. Kohler 

and Dr. Horn 

Dr. Horn 
Dr. Kohler 
Dr. Kohler 

Dr. Horn 

Dr. Horn 

Dr. Kohler 
and Dr. Horn 

Dr. Miller 


...2. 
.. .2. 


..10.. 


. .13. . 




.. .5.. 
.. .5. . 


..14.. 


. .13. . 




.. .5.. 

. . .5. . 


.. 6.. 






Analytical Geometry, Curve 
Tracing and History of Math- 


. . 8. . 




Special Topics in Geometry, 


.. .2. . 


. . 7. . 


. . 7. . 




General Course in Analysis, 
Graduate Courses 


.. .2. . 


. . 4. . 


. . 4. . 




.. .2.. 
.. .2. . 


..3.. 

. . 2. . 


..3.. 
. . 2. . 




Mathematical Journal Club. . . 
Heat, Light and Properties of 


.. .1. . 


. . 5. . 


. . 5. . 




.. .5. . 
.. .5.. 
...4.. 

.. .5.. 
.. .3. . 


25. . 

..11.. 
. . 2. . 






Sound, Electricity and Mag- 


. .23 . 




Theory of Light, Mechanics, 


..23.. 




Theory of Heat, Electricity 

Spectroscopy, post-major 

Graduate Courses 


..11.. 
. . 2. . 




.. .3. 


. . 3. . 


. .2. . 




Introduction to General Chem- 


.. .1. . 


.. 3. . 


. . 3. . 




. . .5. . 


..14.. 






Introduction to Organic Chem- 


.14 . 




Laboratory work, minor 

Theoretical Chemistry, major. 
Organic Chemistry, major. .. . 

Inorganic Chemistry, post- 

Graduate Courses 


...5*. 
...5.. 
.. .5.. 

.. 5}. 

.. .3. . 


..14.. 
..11.. 

..11.. 

. . 5. . 


..14.. 
'.'.12.'. 
..12.. 
..5.. 




.. .1. . 


.. 3.. 
. . 3. . 






Chemical Seminary and Jour- 
Jraduate Courses 


.. 3.. 
. . 3. . 




.. .5.. 
...2.. 

. . .2. . 


..15.. 
. . 1. . 


..15.. 
..6.. 

. . 1 . 






.. .1. . 


. . 1. . 


.. 1. . 











122 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 1906-07 

continued. 



Department 



Biology. 



Course 



General Biology 

Plants, minor 

Vertebrates and Embryology, 

minor 

Laboratory Work, minor 

Animal Physiology, major.. . . 

Laboratory Work, major 

General Zoology, Theoretical 
Biology, Comparative Anat- 
omy, major 

Laboratory Work, major. ... 

Embryology, post-major 

Laboratory Work, post-major 

Morphology, post-major 

Laboratory Work, Morphol- 
ogy.... : .- 

Physiological Chemistry, post- 
major 

Laboratory Work, Physiol-. . . 
ogy, post-major 

Nervous System, post -major. 

Graduate Courses 

History of Evolution 

Physiology 

Laboratory Work 

Morphology 

Journal Club and Seminary . . 







No. IN 


Class 


Instructor 


Hours 
Weekly 


1st 


2nd 






Sem. 


Sem. 


Dr. Tennent 


.. 4. . 


.44.. 




Dr. Randolph 


. . 1. . 


..44. . 




Dr. Warren and 








Dr. Tennent 


. . 5 . 




..41.. 


Dr. Tennent, 








Dr. Warren and 








Dr. Randolph 


. 5*. 


..44. . 


. .41.. 


Dr. Warren 


. . 5. . 


..5.. 




" 


.. 5*. 






Dr. Tennent 








and Dr. Warren 








Dr. Tennent, 


. . .5. . 




.. 5. . 








Dr. Warren and 








Dr. Randolph 


. 5*. 




.. 5.. 


Dr. Tennent 


. . 1.. 


..9.. 


.. 9.. 


" 


3 to 7 


..9.. 


..9.. 


Dr. Stevens 
Dr. Warren 


. . 1. . 


. . 4. 


. . 4. . 


3 to 5 

.. 1.. 


.. 4. . 


.. 4. . 


.. 1.. 




Dr. Warren 


..5.. 


..3.. 


.. 3.. 


Dr. Warren 

Dr. Tennent 
Dr Warren 


. . 1. . 


. . 2. . 


. . 2. . 


. . 1. . 


. . 1. . 


. . 1. . 


. . 1. . 


.. 3.. 


.. 3.. 


" 


..20.. 


.. 3.. 


..3.. 


Dr. Stevens 


. . 1. . 


.. 2.. 


.. 2.. 


Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Warren and 


. . 1. . 


.. 3. . 


..2.. 








Dr. Stevens 









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(123) 



Report of Appointment Secretary. 

To the President : Madam, 

I have the honor to report that the following positions 

have been procured for students through the Bureau of 
Appointments during the year 1906-07 : 

Teachers in Schools 6 

Teacher in Polytechnic Institute 1 

Secretaries in Schools 2 

Teacher and Secretary in School 1 

Private Tutors 2 

Proof Readers 4 

Private Tutor in Summer 1 

Principals of School (by purchase) 2 

Total 19 

Appointments made indirectly 8 

Classes of students who obtained appointments : 

Class of 1896 1 

1904 2 

1905 3 

1906 5 

1907 5 

Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 1906-07 1 

Students still in College * 2 

Total 19 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ethel Walker, 

Appointment Secretary. 



124 



XI. 

Resolutions in Memory of Thomas Scattergood, Trustee of 
Bryn Mawr College from 189k to 1907 , and Member of 
the Board of Directors of the Trustees of Bryn Mawr 
College from 1906 to 1907. 

Born, October 11, 1811. Died, April 18, 1907. 

Minute adopted by the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College 
at a special meeting held June 5, 1907 : 

Thomas Scattergood was elected a Trustee and Director 
May 11, 1891, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation 
of Charles S. Taylor. 

The loss to the board and to the college has been set forth 
on the minutes of the Directors. We, his colleagues, members 
of the Corporation, wish to place on these minutes some ex- 
pression of our personal sorrow in the removal of one who 
has been so long our friend, and some tribute to his character. 

He was of an earnest, intense nature, quick in forming 
his judgments and prompt in carrying them out, yet courteous 
in yielding his own views when the consensus of opinion 
of his associates differed from his. 

As a companion and friend, he was hearty, sincere, and 
genial. Of a grave deportment, by training and habit, his 
genuine sense of humor and lively interest in all that went 
on around him made his company agreeable and desired. 

He was conservative in his own beliefs, but liberal to 
those who saw truth differently. His religion was based on a 
simple, child-like faith in God, his Heavenly Father, and in 
His Son, Jesus Christ, his Saviour. Secure in this love and 
trust, he feared no changes which the years might bring, in 
forms and formulas. 

In this faith he lived and in this faith he died. 

To his widow and children we extend our sympathy, 
and would commit them to His care Who careth for them. 

125 



126 

Minute adopted by the Board of Directors of the Trus- 
tees of Bryn Mawr College at a stated meeting held April 19, 
1907: 

Information was now received of the death of our friend 
and colleague, Thomas Scattergood, at Naples, Italy, on the 
18 th instant. 

Thomas Scattergood was elected a member of the Cor- 
poration and its Board of Directors on May 11, 1894, 
to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Charles S. . 
Taylor, a nephew of Dr. Joseph W. Taylor, founder of the 
college, and one of the thirteen trustees named in his will. 

He took an active interest in the college— as indeed he 
did in everything with which he was connected — an interest 
evidenced by his regular attendance at meetings, and by his 
close attention to the work of committees, where his business 
and financial training and experience made him a much 
valued member, and he gave liberally to various college 
objects. 

His naturally strong and alert mind had been well trained 
in Friends' schools in Philadelphia and at Westtown Board- 
ing School, and upon this excellent foundation was laid the 
education which comes from much reading and study and 
constant mingling with men and large affairs, combined with 
extensive travel in this country and abroad. 

But it was from another and the highest source that his 
real strength and power came. His Christian faith was 
strong, deep and vital. It governed his life. What he was, 
and what good work he did in the world — and he did much — 
had this highest inspiration and origin. 

This is a great thing to say, and our friend never claimed 
great things for himself, but, now that he has gone, the les- 
son which his life teaches us may be pointed out. Those 
who joined that large gathering of his friends at the Me- 
morial Meeting held in Friends' Meeting House, on Twelfth 
Street, had much to think of. The occasion itself was unique 
among Friends in Philadelphia, and there was the natural 
feeling of sorrow and loss which comes over one at such an 
hour. But, besides, there was the thought of the meaning of 
it all. It is written, "Men will praise thee when thou doest 



127 

well for thyself/' but those who met on that occasion came 
not from such motive, but to pay their tribute of affectionate 
respect to one who had tried to follow, however humbly and 
imperfectly, the example set before us in the Gospel. 

He has fought a good fight, he has finished his course, 
he has kept the faith, and we may reverently believe that 
the crown of righteousness is his which the Lord, the righteous 
Judge, shall give, at that day, unto all who love His appearing. 



XII. 



Resolutions in Memory of Professor David Irons, Professor 
of Philosophy of Bryn Mawr College. 

Born, 1869. Died, January 23, 1907. 

Minute adopted by the Board of Directors of the Trus- 
tees of Bryn Mawr College at a meeting held March 15, 1907 : 

The college has sustained a heavy loss in the death of 
Professor David Irons, which occurred January 23, 1907. 
He was Master of Arts of the University of St. Andrews, 
and Doctor of Philosophy of Cornell University. He has 
been the head of the Department of Philosophy in Bryn 
Mawr College since 1900. He was a careful scholar and an 
inspiring teacher, impressing his students with the clearness 
of his judgment, his devotion to his work and his honest con- 
viction. His life and character have left a marked influence 
upon those among whom he worked. 



Resolutions passed by the Faculty of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege: 

Whereas, God, in His wisdom, has removed from our 
midst our colleague, David Irons, Master of Arts of the Uni- 
versity of St. Andrews, Doctor of Philosophy of Cornell 
University, and head of the Department of Philosophy in 
Bryn Mawr College since 1900 : 

Resolved, that we, the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College, 
desire to record our profound grief at the death of Doctor 
David Irons, Professor of Philosophy, our high appreciation 
of his scholarship and efficiency, and our recognition of those 
qualities of kindness, judgment, and honesty of conviction 
which endeared him to one and all of his colleagues; and 
further 

(128) 



129 



Resolved, that a copy of this resolution he sent to his 
relatives as an expression of sympathy in their bereavement. 



Kesolutions passed by the Alumnae Association of Bryn 
Mawr College : 

Whereas, the college has met with an irreparable loss 
in the death of Dr. Irons, Master of Arts of the University 
of St. Andrews, Professor of Philosophy at Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege since 1900 : 

Resolved, that the Alumnae Association desires to ex- 
press to the Directors and Faculty its sincere sympathy and 
grateful acknowledgment of Dr. Irons' services ; be it further 

Resolved, that copies of this resolution be sent to the 
Secretary of the Board of Directors, and to the Secretary of 
the Faculty 



Resolutions passed by the Graduate Club of Bryn Mawr 
College : 

Whereas, in the death of Professor David Irons, who 
since 1900 has been connected with the Department of Phil- 
osophy at Bryn Mawr, the college has suffered a manifold 
loss : be it 

Resolved, that we, the Graduate Club of Bryn Mawr 
College, hereby offer to the Faculty our deep sympathy, and 
express our realisation of his high and noble qualities as a 
scholar and as a man, and in consideration of his helpful 
influence upon the college community, our sincere grief at his 
death ; and be it 

Resolved, that copies of these resolutions be forwarded 
to the Faculty and be inserted in the records of the Graduate 
Club. 



Resolutions passed by the Undergraduate Association of 
Bryn Mawr College : 

Whereas, Professor David Irons, whose death has come 
upon us suddenly and has filled us Avith a sense of great loss, 



130 

has held through the years that he has been here, our highest 
regard and affection as an inspiring teacher and a just and 
fearless man : be it 

Resolved, that we, the Undergraduate Association, do 
hereby express to the Faculty our sorrow, our sympathy and 
our appreciation of the value of the untiring and entire devo- 
tion with which he gave his time and his interest to the 
service of Bryn Mawr College ; and our realisation of our 
great privilege in having had the inspiration and influence of 
his character among us ; and be it further 

Resolved, that a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
Faculty of Bryn Mawr College, and be inserted in the records 
of the association. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



THE PRESIDENT 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



1907-08. 



PRINTED FOR BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

UY THE JOHN C. WINSTON CO. OF PHILADELPHIA 

1908. 



Corporation. 

Board of Trustees. 

Academic Year, 1908-09. 

Charles Hartshorne, 

President. 

Asa S. Wing, Edward Bettle, Jr., 

Treasurer. Secretary. 

Charles Hartshorne. Rufus M. Jones. 

Albert K. Smiley. Alexander C. Wood. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. M. Carey Thomas. 

Howard Comfort. Francis R. Cope, Jr. 

Justus C. Strawbridge. Asa S. Wing. 

James Wood. Charles J. Rhoads. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 

Board op Directors. 
Academic Year, 1908-09. 

Charles Hartshorne, 
President. 

Asa S. Wing, Edward Bettle, Jr., 

Treasurer. Secretary. 

Charles Hartshorne. M. Carey Thomas. 

Albert K. Smiley. Francis R. Cope, Jr. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. Annie Crosby Emery Allinson. 

Howard Comfort. Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 

Justus C. Strawbridge. Mary E. Garrett. 

James Wood. Asa S. Wing. 

Rufus M. Jones. Charles J. Rhoads. 

Alexander C. Wood. Thomas Raeburn White. 

Executive Committee. 

Howard Comfort. M. Carey Thomas. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. Francis R. Cope, Jr. 

Rufus M. Jones. James Wood. 

Annie Crosby Emery Allinson. 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 

Alexander C. Wood. Charles J. Rhoads. 

Asa S. Wing. Howard Comfort. 

M. Carey Thomas. Mary E. Garrett. 

Finance Committee. 

Alexander C. Wood. Asa S. Wing. 

Justus C. Strawbridge. Charles J. Rhoads. 

Mary E. Garrett. 

Library Committee. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. Rufus M. Jones. 

Howard Comfort. Thomas Raeburn White. 

Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 

Religious Life Committee. 

Rufus M. Jones. James Wood. 

Asa S. Wing. 



Officers of Administration. 

academic year, 1908-09. 

President, 
M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D. 
Office: Taylor Hall. 

Assistant to the President, 
Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D. 
Office: Taylor Hall. 

Dean of the College, 

Marion Reilly, A.B. 

Office: The Library. 

Wardens and Assistant Advisers to the Freshman Class, 
Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Pembroke Hall. 
Alice Anthony, A.B., Denbigh Hall. 
Virginia Tryon Stoddard, A.B., Radnor Hall. 
Harriet Jean Crawford, A.B., Rockefeller Hall. 
Bertha Margaret Laws, A.B., Pembroke Hall. 
Friedrika Margrethe Heyl, A.B., Merion Hah 1 . 

Secretary, 
Anna Bell Lawther, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Recording and Appointment Secretary, 
Ethel McCoy Walker, A.M. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Librarian, 
Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S. Office: The Library. 

Director of Athletics and Gymnastics, 
Constance M. K. Applebee. Office: The Gymnasium. 

Comptroller, 
James G. Forrester. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Business Manager, 
Joseph A. Skelley. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Junior Bursar, 
Anna Delany Fry, A.B. Office: Rockefeller Hall. 

Visiting Physician of the College. 
Ella B. Everitt, M.D. Office hours, daily, 10 to 12, 1807 Spruce Street, 
Philadelphia; Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr College, Mondays and Thurs- 
days, 4 to 6. 

Assistant Visiting Physician of the College. 
Anne Heath Thomas, M.D. Office hours, daily, 1.30 to 3, 132 South 
18th Street, Philadelphia; Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr College, Tuesdays, 
Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 4 to 6. 

Attending Physician of the College. 
Thomas F. Branson, M.D. Office hours, daily, 8 to 9.30 and 2 to 3, 
Rosemont, Penna. 



Academic Appointments, 

academic year, 1908-09. 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the College and Professor 
of English. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1877; studied at the Johns Hopkins University, 1877-78; Uni- 
versity of Leipsic, 1879-82; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1882; Sorbonne and College 
de France, 1883. Dean of the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College and Professor of Eng- 
lish, 1885-94. 

Charlotte Angas Scott, D.Sc, Professor of Mathematics. 

Lincoln, England. Graduate in Honours, Girton College, University of Cambridge, 
England, 1880; B.Sc, University of London, 1882; Lecturer on Mathematics in 
Girton College, 1880-84; lectured in connection with Newnham College, University 
of Cambridge, England, 1880-83; D.Sc, University of London, 1885. 

George A. Barton, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Literature and Semitic 
Languages. 

A.B., Haverford College, 1882, and A.M., 1885; studied under the direction of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Hebrew, 18S5-S6; Harvard University, 1S88-91; Thaver Scholar, 
Harvard University, 1889-91; A.M., Harvard University, 1890; Ph.D., Harvard 
University, 1891. Director of the American School of Oriental Study and Research 
in Palestine, 1902-03. 

Joseph W. Warren, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

A.B., Harvard College, 1871 ; University of Berlin, 1871-72 ; Universitv of Leipsic, 1872- 
73; University of Bonn, 1873-79; M.D., University of Bonn, 1880. Assistant and 
Instructor in Physiology, Harvard Medical School, 1881-91 ; Lecturer in Medical 
Department of the University of the City of New York, 1885-86 ; Lecturer in Physi- 
ology, University of Michigan, 1889. 

Elmer P. Kohler, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., Muhlenberg College, 1886, and A.M., 1889. Johns Hopkins University, 1889-91; 
Fellow in Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 1891-92; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1892. 

Florence Bascom, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1882, B.Sc, 1884, and A.M., 1887; Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1891-93; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1893. Assistant in Geology and 
Instructor in Petrography, Ohio State University, 1893-95. 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D., Assistant to the President and Associate in 
Mathematics. 

Reading, England. B.Sc, University of London, 1893, Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 
1896; and B.A., Trinity College, Dublin, 1905; Graduate in Honours, First Class, in 
the Cambridge Mathematical Tripos, 1892; Graduate Student in Mathematics, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1892-93, and Fellow in Mathematics, 1893-94; Holder of the Mary 
E. Garrett European Fellowship, and Student in Mathematics, University of Got- 
tingen, 1894-95. 

Wilmer Cave Wright, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Shrewsbury, England. Girton College, University of Cambridge, England, 1888-92 
Classical Tripos, 1892; Fellow in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93; Fellow in 
Latin, University of Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in Greek, 1894-95; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1895; Reader in Greek and Latin, University of Chicago, 1895-96. 

James H. Leuba, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Education and Director 
of the Psychological Laboratory. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. B.S., University of Neuchatel, 1886; Ph.B., Ursinus College, 
1888; Scholar in Psychology, Clark University, 1892-93; Fellow in Psychology, 
Clark University, 1893-95; Ph.D., Clark University, 1896. 



Fonger DeHaan, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish. 

Leeuwarden, Holland. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1895. Instructor in Modern 
Languages, Lehigh University, 1885-91 ; Fellow in Romance Languages, Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1893—94; Assistant in Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1893-95; Instructor in Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins University, 1895— 

. 96; Associate in Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins University, 1896-97. 

Albert Schinz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French Literature. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. A.B., University of Neuchatel, 1888, and A.M., 1889. Licen- 
tiate in Theology, 1892; Student, University of Berlin, 1892-93; University of Tubin- 
gen, 1893; Ph.D., University of Tubingen, 1894; Sorbonne and College de France, 
1894; Privatdocent, University of Neuchatel, 1896-97; Instructor in French, Clark 
University, 1897-98; Instructor in French, University of Minnesota, 1898-99. 

Arthur Leslie Wheeler, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893; Scholar and Student in Classics, Yale College, 1893-96; 
Ph.D., Yale University. 1896. Instructor and Tutor in Latin, Yale College, 1894- 
1900. 

Ltjcien Foulet, Professor of French Literature. 

Saint Laurent d'Oingt, Rhone, France. Licencie' es Lettres, University of Paris, 
1896; Ecole normale superieure and the Sorbonne, 1896-97; University of Cam- 
bridge, England, and University College, London, 1898; Licencie' d'Anglais, Univer- 
sity of Paris, 1898 ; Ecole normale superieure and the Sorbonne, 1899. 

Henry Nevill Sanders, Ph.D., Professor of Greek. 

Edinburgh, Scotland. A.B., Trinity University, Toronto, 1894, and A.M., 1897; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1903 ; Fellow in Greek, Johns Hopkins University, 1897- 
98. Lecturer in Greek, McGill University, 1900-02. 

William Bashford Huff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1889; A.M., University of Chicago, 1896; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1900. Lecture Assistant in Physics, Johns Hopkins University, 
1899-1900, Assistant in Physics, 1900-01, and Instructor in Physics, 1901-02. 

William Roy Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

A.B., University of Texas, 1897, and A.M., 1898; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1903. 
Acting Professor of History and Political Science, University of Colorado, 1900-01 ; 
Lecturer in History, Barnard College, 1901-02. 

J. Edmund Wright, M.A., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Liverpool, England. Graduate in Honours (Senior Wrangler) in the Cambridge Mathe- 
matical Tripos, 1900, and First Division, First Class, Mathematical Tripos, Part II, 
1901; Smith's Prizeman, 1902; Fellow of Trinity College, University of Cambridge, 
England. 

Lucy Martin Donnelly,* A.B., Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1893; University of Oxford, England, and University of 
Leipsic, 1893-94, Sorbonne and College de France, and University of Leipsic, 1894-95. 

Clarence Carroll Clark, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1896; Ph.D., Yale University, 1903; Scholar in 
Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins University, 1896-97. Instructor in Modern 
Languages, Toledo, Ohio, 1897-99; Scholar in English, Yale University, 1901-02; 
Student in Oxford, Cambridge, and Berlin, 1902-03. 

Karl Detlev Jessen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German Literature. 

Winnemark, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. A.B., University of Chicago, 1896, and 
Fellow in German, 1897-98; Ph.D., University of Berlin, 1901 ; University of Chicago, 
1895-98; University of Kiel, 1899; University of Berlin, 1898-99, 1899-1901. Acting 
Professor of Modern Languages, Eureka College, 1896; Instructor in German, Iowa 
State University, 1897; Instructor in German, Harvard University, 1901-03, and 
Lecturer on German Literature and Aesthetics, 1904. 

Tenney Frank, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin. 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1898, and A.M., 1899; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1903; 
Fellow, University of Chicago, 1899-1901; Assistant and Associate in Latin, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1901-04. 

David Hilt Tennent, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology. 
S.B., Olivet College, 1900; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1902-04; Bruce Fellow, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1904; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1904. 

* Granted leave of absence for the year 1908-09. 



Nettie Maria Stevens,* Ph.D., Associate-in. Experimental Morphology. 

A.B., Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 1899, and A.M., 1900; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1903. Student in Hopkins Seaside Laboratory, Pacific Grove, Summer, 1897, 
1898, 1899, and 1900; Graduate Scholar in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1900-01; 
Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1901-02; Student, Zoological Station, 
Naples, and University of Wiirzburg, 1901-02, 1908-09; Fellow in Biology, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1902-03, and Research Fellow in Biology, 1903-04; Carnegie Research 
Assistant, 1904-05. 

Carleton Fairchild Brown, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 

Philology. 
A.B., Carleton College, 1888; A.M., Harvard University, 1901, and Ph.D., 1903; 

Shattuck Scholar, Harvard University, 1901-03. Instructor in English, Harvard 

University, 1903-05. 

Caroline Louise Ransom, Ph.D., Associate in the History of Art and 

Classical Archaeology. 
A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1896; A.M., University of Chicago, 1900, and Ph.D., 1905; 

Fellow, University of Chicago, 1898-99, 1903-05; Student in Berlin, London, Paris, 

and Athens, 1900-03. 

James Barnes, Ph.D., Associate in Physics. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia. B.A., Dalhousie University; Honours in Mathematics and 
Physics, 1899, and M.A., 1900; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1904. Holder 
of 1851 Exhibition Science Research Scholarship, 1900-03; Fellow, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1903-04, and Assistant in Physics, 1904—06. 

Richard Thayer Holbrook, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French Phi- 
lology and Italian. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1902. Sorbonne, College 
de France, Ecole des Chartes, 1893-94, 1895-96; Student in Italy and University of 
Berlin, 1894-95; Student in Spain, 1901; Tutor in the Romance Languages and 
Literatures, Yale University, 1896-1901, and Columbia University, 1902-06. 

Theodore de Leo de Laguna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., University of California, 1896, and A.M., 1899; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1901. 
Teacher in the Government Schools of the Philippine Islands, 1901-04; Honorary 
Fellow and Assistant in Philosophy, Cornell University, 1904-05; Assistant Profes- 
sor of the Philosophy of Education, University of Michigan, 1905-07. 

Charles Clarence Williamson, Ph.D., Associate in Economics and 
Politics. 

A.B., Western Reserve University, 1904; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1907. Assist- 
ant in Economics and Graduate Student, Western Reserve University, First Sem- 
ester, 1904-05; Scholar in Political Economy, University of Wisconsin, 1904-05; 
Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin, 1905-06; University Fellow in Political 
Economy, Columbia University, 1906-07; Research Assistant of the Carnegie Insti- 
tution, 1905-07. 

George Shannon Forbes, Ph.D., Associate in Chemistry. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1902, A.M., 1904, and Ph.D., 1905. Lecturer in Physical 

Chemistry, Harvard University, 1905-06; John Harvard Fellow, and Student in the 

University of Berlin, 1906-07. 

Hans Weyhe, Ph.D., Associate in German. 

Dessau, Germany. Ph.D., University of Leipsic, 1903; University of Munich, 1897; 
University of Leipsic, 1897-99; University of Berlin, 1899-1901. 

Marion Parris, A.B., Associate in Economics and Politics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1902-05; 
Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1905-06; Bryn Mawr College Research Fellow 
and Student in Economics and Politics, University of Vienna, 1906-07. 

William Henry Allison, Ph.D., Associate in History. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1893; 'B.D., Newton Theological Institution, 1902; Ph.D., 

University of Chicago, 1905; Fellow in Church History, University of Chicago, 

1902-04. Professor of Church History, Pacific Theological Seminary, 1904-05; 

Professor of History and Political Science, Franklin College, 1905-08; Research 

Assistant of the Carnegie Institution, 1906-08. 

Marion Reilly, A.B., Dean of the College and Reader in Philosophy. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02, 
1903, 1903-06; Newnham College, University of Cambridge, Spring, 1907. 

* Granted leave of absence for the year 1908-09. 



Clarence Errol Ferree, A.M., M.S., Lecturer in Psychology. 

B.S., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1900, A.M., 1901, and M.S., 1902. Fellow in Psy- 
chology, Cornell University, 1902-03 ; Assistant in Psychology, Cornell University 
1903-07. 

"Clarence D. Ashley, LL.M., LL.D., J.D., Non-Resident Lecturer in Law. 

A.B., Yale University, 1873; Universityof Berlin, 1876-78; LL.B., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1880; J.D., New York University, 1903. Professor of Law, Metropolis Law 
School, 1891-95: Professor of Law, New York University, 1895-1903; Vice-Dean of 
the Faculty of Law in charge of the Evening Division of the Law Department of 
New York University, 1895-96; Dean of the Faculty of Law, New York University, 
1896-1908. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., N on-Resident Lecturer in English Diction. 

Tynemouth, England. M.A., University of London, 1900. Special Lecturer in 
Elocution, Johns Hopkins University, 1901 ; Special Lecturer in Elocution, Uni- 
versity of California, 1902. 

Orie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., Lecturer in Elizabethan Literature. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1888. Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1903. Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1901-03, and Fellow in English, 1903-04. 

Leila Clement Spaulding,* A.M., Lecturer in the History of Art and 
Classical Archeology. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1899; A.M., Columbia University, 1901. Graduate Student, 
Vassar College, 1899-1900; Curtis Scholar, Columbia University, 1900-01 and 
Graduate Student, 1901-02, 1907-0S; Agnes Hoppin Memorial Fellow and Student 
at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, 1902-03; Instructor in Greek 
and Greek Archaeology, Vassar College, 1903-07. 

M. Katherine Jackson, t Ph.D., Lecturer in English Literature. 

A.B., Ohio V/esleyan University, 1898, and A.M., 1900. Ph.D., Columbia University, 
1906. Instructor in English, Belhaven College, 1900-02; Graduate Student, Colum- 
bia University, 1902-05; Instructor in English Literature, Mount Holyoke College, 
1905-08; Graduate Student, Yale University, 1907-08. 

Chester Albert R,eeds, M.S., Lecturer in Geology. 

B.S., University of Oklahoma, 1905; M.S., Yale University, 1907; Graduate Scholar, 
Yale University, 1905-06; and Fellow, 1906-08. Field Assistant of U. S. Geological 
Survey, 1903-06; Instructor in Mineralogy and Petrology, University of Oklahoma, 
February to June, 1908. 

Rose Chamberlin, M.A., Reader in German. 

Great Yarmouth, England. M.A., Trinity College, Dublin, 1905; Graduate in Honours, 
Newnham College, University of Cambridge, England, 1886 (Medisval and Mod- 
ern Languages Tripos, First Class). 

Harriet Randolph, Ph.D., Demonstrator in Biology and Reader in Botany. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1889; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1889-90; 
University of Zurich, 1890-92; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1892. 

Katherine Fullerton,J A.M., Reader in English. 

A.B., Radcliffe College, 1900, and A.M., 1901. 

Regina Katharine Crandall, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Smith College, 1890; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1902. Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1S93-94, and Fellow in History, 1894-96. Assistant in History, 
Smith College, 1896-99; Instructor in History, Wellesley College, 1899-1900. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1897. Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1896-97, and Fellow in English, 1897-98. College de France, First Semester, 
1898-99. 

Abby Kirk, A.B., Reader in Elementary Greek. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1892. Reader in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-98. 

Helen Ward, A.B., Reader in English. 

A.B., Radcliffe College, 1900. Graduate Student in English, Radcliffe College, 1902-04 . 

* Substitute for Dr. Ransom. f Substitute for Associate Professor Donnelly, 
t Granted leave of absence for the year 1908-09. 



Maud Downing, A.B., Reader in Semitic Languages. 

A.B., University of Toronto, 1902. Graduate Student, University of Toronto, 1902- 
03; Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-07; Honorary Fellow in Semitic 
Languages, Johns Hopkins University, 1908-09. 

Clara Leonora Nicolay, Ph.D., Reader in Elementary French. 

Berlin, Germany. L.L.A., St. Andrew's University, 1900; A.M., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1901, and Ph.D., 1907. University College, Nottingham, England, 1892- 
97. Student in France and Germany, 1903. 

Lily Ross Taylor, A.B., Reader in Latin. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1906. Graduate Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 
1906-07, and Fellow in Latin, 1907-08. 

Virginia Ragsdale, Ph.D., Reader in Mathematics. 

S B , Guilford College, 1892. Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 
1892-93, and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1893-97, 1907-08. A.B., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1896, and Ph.D., 1906. Holder of the Bryn Mawr European Fellow- 
ship, and Assistant Demonstrator in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97; Student, 
University of Gottingen, 1897-98; Holder of Fellowship of the Baltimore Association 
for the Promotion of the University Education of Women, Graduate Scholar, and 
Fellow by Courtesy in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02, and Fellow in 
Mathematics, 1902-03. 

Lillie Deming Loshe, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

AB , Bryn Mawr College, 1899; A.M., Columbia University, 1903, and Ph.D., 1908. 

Graduate Student, Barnard College, 1S99-1900; Columbia University, 1901-04, First 

Semester, 1904-05 and 1905-07. 

Asa Russell Gifford, A.M., Reader in Philosophy. 

A.B., Wesleyan University, 1904 and A.M., Yale University, 1907. Assistant in 
Philosophy, Yale University, 1907-08. 

Frances Lowater, B.Sc, Ph.D., Demonstrator in Physics. 

Nottingham, England. B.Sc, University of London, 1900; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 
1906; University College, Nottingham, 1888-91, 1S92-93; Newnham College, Uni- 
versity of Cambridge, England, 1891-92; Fellow in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 
1896-97, and Graduate Scholar in Physics, 1897-98; Secretary of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1898-99. 

Gertrude Langden Heritage, A.M., Demonstrator in Chemistry. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1899. Graduate Student in Chemistry, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1896-97, 1898-1900, and Graduate Student in Mathematics and Chem- 
istry, 1897-98. 

Una McMahan, A.B., Demonstrator in History of Art and Classical Archae- 
ology. 

A.B., Smith College, 1894. Graduate Student in Greek and Classical Arehaeologv, 
University of Chicago, 1894-95, 1896-99; University of Berlin, 1900-01; Ameri- 
can School of Classical Studies, Rome, 1902-04; Studied in Oxford, 1906, 1907. 

Anna Bell Lawther, A.B., Secretary of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1897. Assistant Bursar, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-1900; 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99, 1904-05; Warden of Merion Hall, 
1904, 1904-05. 

Ethel McCoy Walker, A.M., Recording Secretary and Appointment 
Secretary. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1894, and A.M., 1904. Graduate Scholar in Archaeology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1902-04; Recording Secretary, 1904-06, and Appointment Sec- 
retary, 1905-07. 

Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S., Librarian. 

B.L., University of Nebraska, 1885; B.L.S., New York State Library School, 1902 
Acting Librarian and Adjunct Professor of Bibliography, University of Nebraska, 
1892-97; Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Economy, University of 
Illinois, 1897 ; Classifier, Iowa State University, 1898 ; Second Assistant Librarian, Los 
Angeles Public Library, 1898-99 and Librarian, 1900-05. 

Mary Ellen Baker, A.B., B.L.S., Head Cataloguer. 

A.B., Lincoln University, 1900. B.L.S., New York State Library School, 1908. Assist- 
ant in Latin, Missouri Valley College, 1901-05, and Librarian, 1902-06; Illinois 
State Library School, 1906-07; New York State Library School, 1907-08. 



10 

Bessie Homer Jennings, Assistant Cataloguer. 

Graduate, Drexel Institute Library School, 1900. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

Elizabeth L. Gray, Assistant Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

Mary Warren Taylor, Keeper of Gymnastic Records. 

Ella B. Everitt, M.D., Visiting Physician of the College. 

Anne Heath Thomas, M.D., Assistant Visiting Physician of the College. 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D., Attending Physician of the College. 

John H. Musser, M.D., Consultant Physician. 

George de Schweinitz, M.D., Consultant Oculist. 

Helen Murphy, M.D., Examining Oculist. 



TWENTY-THIED ANNUAL KEPOKT. 

To the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College: 

The President of the College respectfully submits the fol- 
lowing report for the twenty-third academic year of Bryn Mawr 
College, from October 1, 1907, to September 30, 1908. 

The death of Mr. David Scull of Philadelphia occurred on 
November 22, 1907, in the seventy-second year of his age. He 
was one of the trustees of whom there are now only two left 
originally appointed by the Founder of the College. He was at 
the time of his death President of the Board of Trustees and 
President of the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College. For 
nearly a quarter of a century from its opening in 1885 until the 
day of his death he had been devoted to the interests of the col- 
lege. He held successively, and often simultaneously, the most 
laborious offices in the gift of the trustees. He was Secretary of 
the Board of Trustees for eight years from 1885 to 1893, Chair- 
man of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds for nineteen 
years from 1885 to 1904, Vice-President of the Board of Trustees 
from 1894 until his absence abroad in 1904, and President of the 
Board of Trustees, and also President of the Board of Directors, 
from his return in 1906 until his death. Every college building, 
except Taylor Hall and Merion Hall which were planned by the 
Founder of the College himself, was built under the supervision 
of David Scull as Chairman of the trustees' Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds. The harmonious arrangement and 
architectural beauty of Eadnor, Denbigh, the Pembrokes, Kocke- 
feller, and the Library are due in great part to his love of 
beauty and to his wisdom in following expert opinion. The 
liberal organisation and the sound scholarship of the college 
owe much to him. Bryn Mawr has been fortunate in the men 
who have served her on her board of trustees, and never more 
truly fortunate than in David Scull's service during the first 
twenty-three years of her life as a college. In the last appendix 
to this report will be found the memorial resolutions adopted by 

(11) 



12 

the Board of Trustees, the Board of Directors, the Faculty, and 
the Alumna? Association.* 

At the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees held Decem- 
ber 6, 1907, Mr. Charles James Bhoads of Philadelphia, Third 
Vice-President and Treasurer of the Girard Trust Company, a 
son of our late beloved President Doctor James E. Bhoads, was 
elected a Trustee and Director of Bryn Mawr College to fill the 
vacancy caused by the resignation of Mr. Henry Tatnall, men- 
tioned in my last report. Mr. Tatnall was elected a Trustee in 
1894 to fill the vacancy caused by the death of President Ehoads, 
so that Mr. Bhoads now fills his father's seat in the Board. At 
the same meeting Mr. Thomas Baeburn White, a practising 
lawyer of Philadelphia, at present holding the office of Assistant 
City District Attorney, was elected a Trustee and Director to 
fill the vacancy caused by the death of Mr. David Scull. 

Few changes in the faculty have occurred during the pres- 
ent year. 

Mr. Bobert Matteson Johnston who was appointed Associate 
Professor of History to fill the vacancy caused by the resigna- 
tion of Professor Charles McLean Andrews mentioned in my 
last report has filled the position for one year. He was released 
by the directors from his engagement with the college in order 
that he might accept the appointment of Assistant Professor of 
Modern History at Harvard University. Dr. William Henry 
Allison, A.B., Harvard University, 1893, PhD., University of 
Chicago, 1905, Professor of History and Political Science, 
Franklin College, Indiana, 1905-08, Besearch Assistant of the 
Carnegie Institution, 1906-08, was appointed Associate in His- 
tory to fill the vacancy caused by Mr. Johnston's resignation. 

Dr. Daniel Webster Ohern, Associate in Geology, was 
released by the directors from his engagement in order that he 
might accept a full professorship of geology at the University 
of Oklahoma. Mr. Chester A. Beeds, M.S., Yale University, 
1907, Instructor in Mineralogy and Petrology in the University 
of Cincinnati, who has almost completed the work required for 
the doctor's degree at Yale University, was appointed Lecturer 
in Geology to fill the vacancy caused by Dr. Ohern's resignation. 

* See Address in Memorv of David Scnll delivered by the President of the 
College. Printed by The John C. Winston Co., Philadelphia, 1909. 



13 

Dr. Grace Mead Andrus de Laguna, Header in Philosophy, 
resigned her position, and Mr. Asa Knssell Gifford, A.B., Wes- 
leyan University 1904, A.M., Yale University 1907, Assistant 
in Philosophy, Yale University, 1907-08, was appointed Eeader 
in Philosophy to fill the vacancy. Mr. Gifford was highly recom- 
mended by Professor Charles Montague Bakewell, Professor of 
Philosophy in Yale University and a former member of the 
Bryn Mawr College Faculty, under whom Mr. Gifford had pur- 
sued his graduate studies in philosophy for two years. 

Miss Isadore Gilbert Mudge, Ph.B., B.L.S., now away on 
leave of absence who has held the position of Librarian of the 
College for the past five years resigned her position on account 
of ill-health. Miss Mary Letitia Jones, Acting Librarian, was 
appointed in her stead. Miss Jones holds the degree of B.L. 
from the University of Nebraska, 1885, and B.L.S from the 
New York State Library School, 1902. She has filled the fol- 
lowing positions: Acting Librarian and Adjunct Professor of 
Bibliography, University of Nebraska, 1892-97, Librarian and 
Assistant Professor of Library Economy, University of Illinois, 
1897, Classifier at the State University of Iowa, 1898, Second 
Assistant Librarian, Los Angeles Public Library, 1898-99, 
and Librarian, Los Angeles Public Library, 1900-05 ; Director 
of the Summer School of Library Methods at the University of 
California in the summer of 1907. 

Miss Lucy Martin Donnelly, Lecturer in English, was pro- 
moted to be Associate Professor of English and granted leave of 
absence for the academic year 1908-09. Dr. M. Katherine Jack- 
son, A.B. and A.M., Ohio Wesleyan University, and Ph.D., 
Columbia Universit} r , and Instructor in English Literature, 
Mount Holyoke College, 1905-08, was appointed Lecturer in 
English Literature for one year to conduct Miss Donnelly's work 
during her absence. 

Dr. Caroline Louise Eansom, Associate in the History of 
Art and Classical Archaeology, was granted leave of absence for 
the second semester of the academic year 1908-09 in order to 
attend the Archaeological Congress to be held in Cairo in Febru- 
ary, 1909. Miss Leila Clement Spaulding, A.M., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1901, and Instructor in Archaeology at Yassar College, 



14 

1903-07, was appointed Lecturer in Art and Archaeology to 
conduct Dr. Eansom's work during her absence. 

Dr. Nettie Maria Stevens, Associate in Experimental Mor- 
phology, was granted leave of absence for the academic year 
1908-09 in order to study abroad, and her courses were inter- 
mitted until her return. 

Miss Katharine Fullerton who has filled the position of 
Eeader in English at Bryn Mawr College for the past seven 
years was granted leave of absence for the academic year 1908- 
09. Dr. Lillie Deming Loshe, A.B., Bryn Mawr College and 
Ph.D., Columbia University, was appointed Eeader in English 
for one year to conduct Miss Pullerton's work during her 
absence. 

A full list of other changes and promotions in the faculty 
and staff of the college may be found in the first appendix to 
my report. 

The most important problem now facing the college is 
the excess of expenditures over receipts caused by the steady 
rise of prices since 1902 which has greatly increased our 
expenses and materially diminished our receipts from the 
room-rent of our halls of residence and from various col- 
lege industries in which the expenditure has been in the 
past nicely adjusted to the income. Our salary budget has 
steadily and inevitably risen from year to year notwithstand- 
ing the decrease in college income, the increase in salaries 
alone in the year covered by this report over those of the 
preceding year being nearly $11,000. The members of our 
faculty and staff, especially the junior members, can no 
longer live on the salaries formerly paid. It has become 
impossible to make new appointments of the same grade 
of excellence without offering much higher initial salaries 
than were necessary a few years ago. In our halls of resi- 
dence it costs over $3,000 more a year than it cost in 1900 
to furnish exactly the same table for the same number of 
students. During the current year it has become necessary 
to raise the wages of the -maids in all our halls 50 cents a 
week, making an annual excess expenditure for wages of 



15 



over $1,000. These are only a few* instances of the general 
rise in prices which has affected almost every department 
of the college. From the opening of the college in 1885 
until the year 1902, when the increase in the cost of living 
first began to be seriously felt, it proved possible by careful 
management to keep our annual expenditures within our 
annual income. In the year 1902 our accumulated sur- 
plus of income amounted to $49,287 which was used by the 
trustees to refund the endowment fund of the college for 
certain advances from principal made for the purpose of 
opening the college for students a year sooner than would 
otherwise have been possible. In the college years 1902-03 
and 1903-04, the first years of the high prices, occurred our 
first income deficits, but in the second year our tuition fees 
were increased from $150 to $200 in order partially to 
cover the extra expenses. In the following three years 
we were able to avoid deficits, but in the year covered by my 
report we are again confronted by a very serious shortage 
of income, even although the price of students' table board 
has been increased by $25 for each student in order to 
equalise the actual receipts and expenditures for food. 

The increase in the cost of provisions, labor, and mate- 
rials has been so great within the past eight years that both 
men's and women's colleges have been reduced to sore straits. 
Their buildings can no longer be repaired or administered, 
their students can no longer be fed, their professors can no 
longer be secured and retained for the same expenditure as 
formerly. The experience of Bryn Mawr College is the 
same as that of all other colleges and universities of high 
standing. As long as present prices continue it seems to 
be wholly impossible to maintain our present standards of 
teaching and academic equipment and our present healthful 
physical conditions without accumulating constantly increas- 
ing deficits. Unless our private university foundations are 
to be generously and adequately endowed only two solutions 
seem possible. Either colleges must steadily deteriorate in 
efficiency and intellectual power, losing from year to year the 



16 



ablest members of their faculties as well as their ablest stu- 
dents in order to live within their ever narrowing incomes, 
or the leading colleges of the country must agree with one 
another to charge their students in future what it costs to 
educate them. Higher education seems to be almost the only 
thing of great commercial, intellectual, and social value sold 
at less than its actual cost. As our colleges and professional 
schools are wholly unable to meet out of their endowments 
the difference between the cost of education and the amount 
paid for it they must unavoidably assume a mendicant atti- 
tude toward their wealthy graduates and patrons, and by 
flagrant underpayment compel their professors, however un- 
willingly, to contribute part of the salaries which they should 
receive in order to educate by charity students whose parents 
are abundantly able to pay for their education. It would 
surely be more honest to charge such students what it actually 
costs in order to be able to pay college professors living 
salaries which should attract into the highest of all profes- 
sions well bred men and women of intellect and power, and 
use the income of our endowments for scholarships for poorer 
students and for additional academic equipment. 

The method of meeting the present desperate financial 
situation adopted by many colleges for men by soliciting 
their wealthy graduates for contributions to make up annual 
deficits is not very satisfactory or self-respecting, nor can 
it be regarded as more than a temporary makeshift. Under 
no circumstances is it an expedient open to colleges for 
women. The graduates of women's colleges seldom have 
money in their own right and even if they are self-supporting 
they make very little more than enough for their own living 
expenses. These conditions in women's colleges will prob- 
ably continue for a long time. In regard to endowment, col- 
leges for women are in a very different position from col- 
leges for men. They are one and all inadequately endowed. 
"No one of them has a million dollars of invested endowment 
apart from moneys invested in land, dormitories, and other 
college buildings. Almost all the large fortunes of the 
country are in the hands of men, and very few men seem 



17 

to realise the necessity of giving girls>a thorough college edu- 
cation. Even wealthy women have as yet given very little 
to women's colleges. Indeed women give to men's education 
in memory of their husbands or sons larger amounts than 
men give to women's education. Men's colleges also receive 
large gifts from their rich alumni for endowment and 
buildings. 

The great increase in the cost of educating college stu- 
dents is being met in so far as men's education is concerned 
by a corresponding increase of endowment. How are women's 
colleges to meet the similar condition with which they are 
confronted ? 

It is clear that unless the few people of wealth in the 
United States who care for women's college education endow 
it liberally, women's colleges will become less and less good. 
Parents in the east have begun to send their daughters to 
separate colleges for women, and there is, I think, every 
reason to believe that they will continue to send them, even 
if colleges for women deteriorate. And girls themselves 
wherever they have a choice seem to prefer separate colleges, 
and will probably continue to prefer them, even if they be- 
come less good than co-educational colleges or annexes. Un- 
less something can be done soon to put our eastern colleges 
for women on a financial basis which will compare favorably 
with the endowment of the best eastern colleges for men, our 
eastern girls will soon again be receiving an inferior educa- 
tion as in the times of Emma Willard and Mary Lyon. 

There is now a magnificent opportunity, such as has 
never existed before, for endowing women's education. The 
leading eastern colleges for women have been in operation as 
highly organised fully developed colleges for from thirty-five 
to twenty-five years. Throughout this time they have been 
well and economically administered at great personal sacrifice 
of time and money by their governing boards and faculties. 
Their endowments have been so meagre that one dollar has 
had to do the work of two. Their governing boards are 



IS 



experienced in the care of money, devoted to the cause of 
Woman's education, and could be trusted to administer endow- 
ments to the best advantages. Colleges for women are the 
only educational institutions now in existence in the United 
States in which women themselves are studying the problems 
of education as they affect women. Deeply interested women 
alumnse are working on their governing boards, well trained 
enthusiastic women professors are teaching in all of them. 
Three of the five leading colleges for women, Bryn Mawr, 
Wellesley, and Mt. Holyoke are administered by women 
presidents and women deans and, though the other two col- 
leges, Vassar, and Smith, have men presidents, the manage- 
ment of the students themselves and the details of adminis- 
tration are to a great extent in the hands of women. 

If the governing boards and faculties of these five 
women's colleges with the experience they have gained in 
the past and the devotion they have proved themselves to 
possess for women's education could at this crisis in their 
history be given adequate funds, they could study the special 
problems presented by women's education, work them out 
practically, and reach a wise solution. It is essential that 
women, not men, should solve the problems of women's edu- 
cation. And women can do this only, I think, in colleges for 
women in which they are practically in control. In educa- 
tion as in most other things the most powerful influence is 
exerted from above downward. An adequate endowment of 
the best five colleges for women would probably do more 
than anything else to raise and improve all forms of college 
and school education for girls not only in this country but 
abroad where the education of girls is tending to be con- 
ducted on principles and methods worked out in America. 

An additional endowment of two millions apiece would, 
I believe, enable these colleges to put their educational work 
on a thoroughly satisfactory basis, and to continue it on a 
higher level than at present for the next half century. Al- 
though an endowment of two millions added to their present 
endowment, which averages less than a half million apiece 
apart from lands and buildings, is small as compared to the 



19 

endowment of men's colleges, it would be adequate to main- 
tain excellent college departments without costly professional 
schools such as are attached to men's colleges. 

There is only one professional school which should be 
maintained by every college for women, that is, a profes- 
sional school for the training of teachers. Of all the grad- 
uates of Bryn Mawr 43 per cent are engaged in some paid 
occupation, and of these 60 per cent are teaching. In some 
of the other colleges for women the proportion of teachers 
is even larger. The experience of both men's and women's 
colleges proves that unless college graduates who expect to 
teach are given an opportunity to train themselves in the 
science of teaching in the colleges where they study the 
greater number of them do not get this training at all. The 
college women of to-day will be the most highly paid and 
progressive teachers of to-morrow. School teaching is 
practically in the hands of women. If we can train these 
women college students in the best educational methods we 
shall through them reform the teaching of boys and girls in 
primary and secondary schools. If two millions of dollars 
were added to the endowment of these five leading colleges 
for women, at least $500,000 ought, in my opinion, to be 
set aside by each college to maintain a professional school 
for teachers. In these five training schools women them- 
selves could seriously study the problems of teaching in 
secondary schools and could train hundreds of young women 
teachers to put in practice the results obtained. A great 
advance in our present methods of teaching children would 
be the immediate result of such college training schools. 

It would, it seems to me, be impossible for a great gift 
of ten millions of dollars to bring more far reaching and 
more enduring returns. Its influence would multiply itself 
from decade to decade a thousand fold. Women are the 
teachers of the race. They teach their own children in the 
home and the children of others in the schools. If the 
teachers of each generation can be well taught, the progress 
of the next generation is sure. If the endowments of even 
a few colleges for women could be made adequate to do this 



20 



great work, the results of such a benefaction could scarcely 
be overestimated. 

.. From what I have said it must be evident to everyone 
interested in the future of Bryn Mawr that the next few 
years must be spent in a determined effort to secure addi- 
tional endowment for the college. The original plant of 
the college has been more than doubled by gifts for buildings 
and equipment in the six years since 1902, a new gymnasium 
is now being built, and a new infirmary is already promised 
as is explained later in my report. During this time, how- 
ever, and indeed since the beginning of the college, not one 
dollar has been given for permanent endowment, with the 
exception of gifts and legacies to found scholarships amount- 
ing to about $40,000 which are not available for general col- 
lege purposes. In 1900, the alumnse of the college realised the 
pressing need of more endowment and decided to endeavor 
to raise an endowment fund of $1,000,000. In spite of their 
generous and self-sacrificing efforts they have not yet suc- 
ceeded in completing the first one hundred thousand dollars 
of this million. In December, 1907, the Board of Directors 
appointed a committee to consider the whole financial situa- 
tion of the college and to co-operate with the alumnse. This 
committee consists of Mr. James Wood, Chairman of the 
Committee, Mr. Howard Comfort, Chairman of the Execu- 
tive Committee, Mr. Alexander C. Wood, Chairman of the 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds, Mr. Asa S. Wing, 
Treasurer of the Board, and the President of the College. 

The directors passed very few legislative measures dur- 
ing the year covered by my report. 

The policy of electing two full professors in one subject 
was carefully considered, and it was decided that at the 
present time it was the sense of the Board that it was inex- 
pedient for financial and other reasons to create two full 
professorships, or one full professorship and one junior pro- 
fessorship, in any single department of the college. 

The Senate of the College consisting of all full pro- 
fessors who have been in the service of the college at least 



21 

ten years was enlarged by the addition of Professors Bas- 
com, Leuba, and DeHaan. The directors ruled that a year's 
leave of absence should be regarded for this purpose as a year 
of active service. 

The Academic Council of the College, which deals with 
the qualifications for the degree of Master of Arts and Doctor 
of Philosophy, was increased by the directors from twelve 
to fifteen members by the appointment of Associate Pro- 
fessor William B. Huff, Associate Professor Carleton F. 
Brown, and Dr. Karl D. Jessen, Associate in German Lit- 
erature. 

A year's leave of absence with an allowance for travel- 
ling expenses amounting to one-third of the regular salary 
was granted by the directors after seven years of service 
to a member of our staff who was not a member of the 
faculty. It was decided that this should form a precedent 
for the future. 

So many requests for permission to be absent from 
commencement have been received by the directors during 
the year covered by my report, as well as in previous years, 
that it became clear to the Board that unless some rule of 
procedure were adopted our commencements would be held 
without the leading members of our faculty. The working 
year of Bryn Mawr College is at the present time shorter 
than that of any other college and our summer vacation is 
within one week of being four months in length. It is 
the sense of the Board that every member of the faculty 
and staff should be present at commencement. 

The directors voted to assign more work to the Readers 
in English, and requested them not to accept in future en- 
gagements to teach or lecture in preparatory schools. They 
also voted to increase the present salary of each English 
Reader by $300 a year. 

The directors passed several resolutions affecting the 
student body. The rule to the effect that a student who has 
not received the grade of merit in as many as one-half the 
number of hours she has taken may not take part in college 
entertainments, or hold paying positions in connection with 



22 



the college or executive offices in the Students' Associa- 
tion for Self-Government, the Undergraduate Association, 
the Christian Union, the League for the Service of Christ, 
the Lantern, or the Students' Building Committee was inter- 
preted to include the executive officers of the Athletic Asso- 
ciation, the captains of the athletic teams, the officers of stu- 
dents' clubs or associations whose duties include executive 
work, and also the officers of Tipyn o' Bob, the magazine 
published monthly by the students. It is essential that 
students who are deficient in their academic work should 
be protected as far as possible from outside engagements. 

The charge of five dollars already imposed on students 
taking special advanced standing, deferred, or conditioned 
examinations was extended to include examinations deferred 
on account of illness, or deferred, or forfeited as punishment 
by the faculty. The Board has adopted the principle that 
all papers that must be made out separately by the professors 
should be paid for by the students who make this necessary. 
By vote of the directors, these fines will be added to the 
annual appropriation for books. 

It was voted by the faculty on December 11, 1907, that 
the committee for the supervision of examinations should be 
empowered to call into conference if it so desire represen- 
tatives of preparatory schools to discuss previous entrance 
examination papers, and should also be empowered to invite 
to conference the members of the faculty who have set the 
papers in question. This is an important step taken by the 
faculty, and will in all probability mean in the future closer 
co-operation between our examiners and the teachers in the 
schools that prepare their pupils for entrance to the college. 

The faculty considered during the year the abuses which 
had grown up under the auditor system, which has been in 
operation since the opening of the college, and on December 
16, 1907, passed the following rule: "undergraduate students 
may become auditors, (1) by permission of the office in any 
course when unable to do full work in that course on account 
of ill health; (2) by special permission of the faculty, except 



23 

in courses specified by the instructors to the office as not 
open to auditors, when the necessary time has been gained 
by advanced standing credits; (3) by the application of the 
rule concerning extended absence from classes ; (4-) at the 
discretion of the Petition Committee in cases of students on 
probation under the merit law." 

As a result of a conference between the Academic Com- 
mittee of the 'Alumnae Association of the College, the Presi- 
dent of the College, and two members of the faculty, the fac- 
ulty voted on May 6, 1908, to permit the Readers in German 
and French to hold an informal oral examination for sopho- 
mores and juniors in the oral reading recommended by the 
faculty to be done during the preceding summer as a prepa- 
ration for the senior orals in German and French; and the 
faculty further voted that only those students who had volun- 
tarily submitted themselves to these informal oral examina- 
tions should be admitted to the first oral examination held by 
the faculty in November of their senior year. 

In consequence of the expulsion of an undergraduate 
student in the preceding year on account of having forged 
the signature of a member of the faculty in her course book, 
the faculty voted on May 6, 1908, that at the end of each 
semester each course book should be signed for attendance 
with the instructor's full signature. 

The new schedule of entrance examinations, extending 
the time of examinations from five to eight days, adopted 
by the faculty and approved by the directors in the pre- 
ceding year, went into operation in the spring of 1908 and 
was so seriously criticised by the preparatory schools that 
the faculty was compelled to reconsider its action and an- 
nounce that a six days' schedule would be arranged for the 
examination to be held in the spring of 1908-09. The objec- 
tions made were that the earlier date of beginning the exam- 
inations interfered with the commencements of the schools 
and that it was impossible for pupils taking the examinations 
to arrange to give up eight days to them, especially as this 
often necessitated their spending eight instead of five or six 
days away from home in hotels or boarding houses. 



24 



It has been a cause of much concern to the scientific 
departments of physics, chemistry, geology, and biology that 
the number of students electing scientific groups seems to 
have- been slowly but steadily decreasing during the past six 
years. As it is possible that a contributory cause may be the 
lack of punctuality in closing the laboratories at four o'clock 
and the confusion in regard to the closing hour on account 
of the extra half-hour of laboratory work on every other 
Wednesday, the six scientific professors who conduct labora- 
tory work agreed, with the approval of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Board of Directors, to close the laboratories 
every Wednesday at four o'clock instead of at half past four 
and to exercise great care in closing the laboratories 
promptly. 

The Bryn Mawr Students' Association for Self-Govern- 
ment, at a meeting held April 24, 1907, voted the following 
amendments to the constitution of the Association, which 
were approved by the Directors of the College on May 17, 
1907, in accordance with Article XI: 

(1) Article V, Section II, 1, to read: 

The officers and the other three members of the Execu- 
tive Board shall be annually elected by ballot by the Asso- 
ciation in the fortnight after the assignment of rooms, and 
shall enter upon their duties immediately at the conclusion 
of all the elections. 

(2) To be added to Article VII, as Section III: 

In cases where criminal charge might be necessary, the 
Executive Board shall, at their discretion, hand over the 
evidence to the President of the College for further action. 

(3) Article VIII to read: 

Section 1 : There shall be a representative elected by 
each hall to act as Head Proctor and to be generally re- 
sponsible to the Executive Board for the conduct of her 
hall. 

Section 2 : There shall be an Advisory Board com- 
posed of these representatives together with a representa- 
tive of the non-resident students and of the graduate school. 
The duties of this Board shall be to advise with the Execu- 



25 

tive Board at the request of one or more members of the 
Executive Board. 

Section 3 : The Advisory Board shall be annually 
elected by ballot in the fortnight following the election of 
the officers and Executive Board, the term of office to be the 
following academic year. 

As these changes were omitted from the last president's 
report and as it seems exceedingly desirable that they should 
be recorded I have thought it best to include them in this 
report. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors held October 
18, 1907, a communication was received from the Executive 
Committee of the Bryn Mawr Students' Association for 
Self-Government asking for an interpretation of clause 4 
of the charter granted by the trustees of the college to the 
students for self-government. This clause reads as fol- 
lows: — "If when a new matter arises, there is any doubt as 
to which of these three provinces of jurisdiction it belongs 
and who shall deal with it, the Executive Board of the 
Students' Association shall consult with the Dean before any 
action is taken by them." This interpretation was made 
necessary by the appointment of Miss Marion Beilly as 
Dean of the College. On November 15, 1907, the Board 
of Directors adopted the following resolution: — "Besolved, 
That, in the opinion of the Board of Directors of Bryn 
Mawr College, this order of procedure is entirely proper, 
but that, as the President is the head of the college, and as 
such is held responsible for its government and reputation, 
the Board of Directors expects that in all cases of suffi- 
cient importance arising under said clause 4, the President 
and Dean of the College shall consult together, and the 
Executive Board of the Bryn Mawr Students' Association 
for Self-Government shall consult with the President and 
Dean of the College as circumstances may require." This 
resolution was approved by the Executive Board of the Bryn 
Mawr Students' Association for Self-Government and was 
printed by them as an appendix to the charter in the edition 



26 



of the Constitution and Resolutions of the Association, which 
appeared in November, 1907. 

On February 13, 1908, the Students' Self-Government 
Association voted to abolish cheering in the dining rooms 
of the college. The noise in the dining rooms has always 
been a serious problem, and the noise and disturbance made 
by the student body in cheering athletic teams, alumnse who 
return to dine in hall, and other persons has subjected the 
college to serious outside criticism. According to popular tra- 
dition, cheering was introduced into the college by the Class 
of 1897 in its freshman year. On March 17, 1897, the 
President of the College called the attention of the Executive 
Board of the Students' Self-Government Association to the 
abuse of cheering and in consequence proctors were ap- 
pointed at each table to control cheering and other disturb- 
ances. Between 1899 and 1901 this rule was changed and 
permission to cheer was given only by a member of the 
Executive Board of the Self-Government Association. On 
November 21, 1902, the first self-government rule on the 
subject was made limiting cheering in the larger halls of 
residence to ten minutes after the dining room doors were 
closed. Stricter regulations were made by the Executive 
Board of the Association in 1906 after conferences with 
the President of the College, but these regulations were not 
obeyed by the undergraduate body. In November, 1907, 
the rules which had been disregarded were rescinded and 
the regulation of cheering placed in the hands of the stu- 
dents of each hall subject to the approval of the Executive 
Board of the Self-Government Association. From that time 
until cheering was abolished the President and Dean of the 
College conferred several times with the Executive Board 
of the Association urging the Board to take action and the 
President of the College addressed the students on the sub- 
ject in chapel. It is a matter of very great gratification that 
the student body voluntarily voted to abolish cheering in 
the dining rooms of the college because they were unwilling 
to continue a practice which was disliked and misunderstood 
by the parents and friends of the students and by many of 
the alumnae. 



27 

During the year covered by my report four students 
were required to leave the college. One graduate student 
and one undergraduate student were sent away by the Presi- 
dent of the college in consultation with the physicians in 
charge; one undergraduate, a member of the senior class, 
was expelled for misconduct on recommendation of the Exec- 
utive Board of the Students'. Self-Government Association; 
and one undergraduate, a member of the junior class, was 
expelled on recommendation of the Senate of the College 
for handing in an essay which was not her own. 

Miss Helen Strong Hoyt who resigned her position as 
Header in English in June, 1907, after having been connected 
with the English department of the college for nine years, 
offered the Directors $1,000 to found the Mary Helen Ritchie 
Memorial Prize in memory of Mary Helen Ritchie. Miss 
Hoyt asked that the income of this $1,000 should be used 
to purchase a set of the works of Shakespeare each year 
to be given as a prize to the member of the graduating class 
who in the judgment of the committee of award during the 
four years of her college life had seemed most to keep alive 
the qualities of joyousness, fortitude, high courage, and 
faithfulness. This gift was gratefully accepted at the meet- 
ing of the Board of Directors held April 17, 1908, and it 
was voted by the directors that the committee for the award 
of this prize should be constituted as suggested by the donor 
and should consist of the President of the College, the Assist- 
ant to the President, the Dean of the College, the wardens 
of the halls of residence, the presidents of the three students' 
associations — Self-Government, Undergraduate, and Athletic 
— the Secretary of the College, and Associate Professor 
Lucy Martin Donnelly as long as she shall remain asso- 
ciated with the college, and after her death or resignation, 
of the teacher of the course in General English, provided 
this appointment should meet with the approval of the other 
members of the committee. 

In my report of last year, pages 35-36, I called atten- 
tion to the urgent need of a larger gymnasium. In the 



28 

spring of 1908 a committee of the Students' Athletic Asso- 
ciation consisting of Miss Marjorie Young, the President of 
the Athletic Association, Chairman, Miss Cynthia M. Wes- 
son, the Outdoor Manager, and Miss Constance M. K. Apple- 
bee, the Director of Athletics and Gymnastics, called at my 
office to ask to have plans drawn for enlarging the gymnasium 
as the Athletic Association wished to begin to beg for the 
money necessary for this purpose. Messrs. Lockwood de 
Forest of ISTew York and Winsor Soule of Boston were asked 
by the Committee on Buildings and Grounds to make plans 
for enlarging the gymnasium, but it was soon found that 
it was impossible to alter the old gymnasium so as to give 
the space needed by the students. Moreover the old gym- 
nasium was built in 1884 of red brick in an architectural 
style out of accord with the later college buildings and was 
intended to be used by only one hundred students and was 
therefore totally inadequate, even when added to and ex- 
tended, for the needs of over four hundred students. At the 
request of the Athletic Association a new building was de- 
signed by the architects in the collegiate gothic style of the 
other buildings of native gray stone with Indiana limestone 
trimmings. 

Estimates were obtained and it was found that it would 
cost $34,000 to build, light, and heat a gymnasium accord- 
ing to the architects' plans. Toward the end of May the 
committee of the Students' Athletic Association informed 
the President of the College that they had already obtained 
$21,000 and appealed to her to help them to obtain the 
remaining $13,000 needed. Thirteen subscriptions of $1,- 
000 each were given to the President of the College by 
neighbors and friends in order to enable the students to 
complete the total amount of $34,000 as follows : Mr. John 
H. Converse, Mr. Samuel M. "Vauclain, Mr. Justus C. Straw- 
bridge, Mr. Charles E. Pugh, Mr. William L. Austin, Mr. 
Alba B. Johnson, the late Mr. James W. Paul, Jr., Mr. 
and Mrs. Erancis L. Potts, Doctor John P. Munn for Miss 
Aristine P. Munn of the Class of 1909, Mr. and Mrs. 
William P. Uenszey, Mr. Joseph 1ST. Pew, Mr. Justus C. 



29 



Strawbridge (a second subscription)*, and Mr. Henry II. Col- 
lins. Later the Class of 1912 subscribed an additional $800 
in order that leaded glass might be substituted for plate 
glass in the great windows. The total cost of the gymnasium 
when completed will therefore be $31,800.* The dimensions 
of the main exercising room will be 90 feet by 50 feet by 
22 feet which is large enough for a gymnastic class of one 
hundred students and the winter games of indoor tennis and 
basket-ball. In order to conform to modern requirements 
the new running track will be six feet in width instead of 
four feet as formerly. The swimming tank will be preserved 
from the former building and will be adequately lighted 
by windows along its entire length. Cloak-rooms and wait- 
ing-rooms of ample size are provided. A double staircase 
will ascend through the tower to a roof garden over the 
main gymnasium, 90 feet by 50 feet, which may be used 
for class suppers and other purposes. There will be a num- 
ber of exits in case of fire. In addition to a large entrance 
hall and stairway, double doors will open at the rear of the 
main room on the back road; iron stairways will connect 
the running track and main room with the basement where 
there will be another large doorway. The stairway hall out- 
side the running track will open through two doors on the 
low roofs on either side of the entrance tower. 

The contract, for the new gymnasium was signed on 
August 10, 1908, and the contractors immediately began to 
tear down the old building. The new gymnasium will be 
completed and ready for use in February, 1909. 

Of the $21,000 raised by the Athletic Association, $15,- 
000 was subscribed by the four undergraduate classes and 
their friends and $6,000 by the alumnae of the college. 
There was one subscription of $10,000, one of $5,000, one 
of $200, one of $125, six subscriptions of $100, six sub- 

* This amount was increased to $38,164 by necessary expenditures and 
the additional amount, $3,364, was given by Miss Cynthia Maria Wesson, of 
the class of 1909. Miss Wesson also gave $7,293 in order to tile the swim- 
ming pool and the swimming pool room and to introduce indirect instead of 
direct radiation. Mr. Alexander C. Wood and Mr. Asa S. Wing, of the Board 
of Directors, also contributed $150 each to the cost of the changes in heating, 
and the Students' Athletic Association gave $170 for cementing the basement, 
$128 for the trophy room, and $20 for rubber matting and painting. 



30 



scriptions of sums varying between $50 and $100, fourteen 
subscriptions of $50 each, seven subscriptions of sums vary- 
ing between $50 and $25, nine of $25, one of $23, seven sub- 
scriptions of $20, two of $16, twenty-four subscriptions of 
$15, twenty-four subscriptions of $10, forty-four subscrip- 
tions of $5, three of $4, six of $3, and many smaller sub- 
scriptions. 

This is the first time that so large a gift has been made 
to the college by the undergraduates. Our sincere thanks 
are due to the Students' Athletic Association and especially 
to their begging committee for the enthusiasm and energy 
which they have shown in originating, planning, and success- 
fully carrying through this large and difficult undertaking. 
The new gymnasium will be a great addition to the college. 

During the year covered by my report the Board of 
Directors requested the Directors of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion to advance them from the money already raised by 
the alumnge for the endowment fund of the college as a 
loan the sum of $16,000 in order that in the summer of 
1908 the Committee on Buildings and Grounds might add 
to and alter Tan-y-Bryn, one of the faculty houses on Col- 
lege Hill which was too large for one professor, so that 
it might be subdivided into two houses to be occupied by 
Professor Lucien Foulet and Professor Carleton F. Brown, 
and also build a house on the campus for the Dean of the 
College. It was estimated that the alteration of Tan-y-Bryn 
would cost $6,000, and that the annual rental of the two 
houses would amount to $960 instead of $550 as before, so 
that the $410 additional would pay interest on the loan and 
meet the cost of the annual repairs, and that the Dean's house 
would cost $10,000. 

Before requesting the Alumnse Association to advance 
$16,000 of their gift for investment in houses for the faculty 
the Board carefully considered the whole question of build- 
ing houses for members of the faculty and administrative 
staff, and the Committee on Buildings and Grounds made a 
careful examination of the interest received on money in- 



31 

vested in faculty houses during, the past twelve years and 
reported to the Board that the interest on the investment had 
averaged slightly over five per cent, thus comparing very 
favorably with other investments made by the Finance Com- 
mittee. As a result of the investigation it was voted to inform 
the alumna? directors that it is in the opinion of the directors 
highly desirable to build houses for the faculty and admin- 
istrative staff in order that they may be able to live comfort- 
ably and under pleasant conditions on the salaries which 
they receive from the college, and that the experience of 
the Board in building and maintaining such houses has 
proved that it is possible to provide them for the faculty 
without lessening in any way the annual income of the col- 
lege. The Board of Directors of the Alumnse Association 
responded cordially to this request and expressed in their 
reply the same point of view. The united decision thus 
reached by the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 
and the Board of Directors of the Alumnse Association is 
very important, as I take it to mean that provided the 
necessary funds can be secured the directors will build 
houses for the faculty and staff as they are needed. 

The directors granted a request from Professor Char- 
lotte Angas Scott to be permitted to make additions and 
improvements to Gwynfa, the house rented by her from the 
college, at a cost not exceeding $2,000, $1,000' to be pro- 
vided by the college, and $1,000 by Professor Scott her- 
self with the understanding that the rent of Gwynfa should 
be increased by $100 a year in order to pay the interest 
on the additional cost and cover all possible losses. The 
$1,000 provided by the college was also advanced as a loan 
by the alumnse directors from the endowment fund which 
they are raising for the college. Mr. George Archer of 
Baltimore was employed as architect of Tan-y-Bryn and 
Mr. Lockwood de Forest and Mr. Winsor Soule as the archi- 
tects of the house of the Dean of the College. Professor 
Scott acted as her own architect. 

The Alumnse Association has therefore paid over to the 
Directors of the College for investment in faculty houses 



32 

the sum of $17,000, as follows: — for the division of Tan-y- 
Bryn $6,000 ; for the house of the Dean of the College $10,- 
000; for improvements and additions to Gwynfa $1,000. 
As it has been decided by the Alurnnas Association that the 
first installment of the endowment fund of $1,000,000 shall 
be presented to the college as soon as the subscriptions have 
reached $100,000, and as this time is now near at hand, 
this loan really represents a permanent investment of part 
of the endowment fund. 

In the spring of 1907 Miss Mary E. Garrett, a Director 
of the College, received permission from the directors to 
rebuild and enlarge the president's house, the Deanery, at 
her own expense, as a gift to the college, according to plans 
and specifications approved by the Board, in order to provide 
the necessary facilities for college entertaining and also to 
provide adequate offices and workingrooms for the President 
of the College. This subject was not mentioned in my last 
report because the rebuilding was not begun until October, 
1907. The work was continued throughout the winter, 
spring and summer of 1908 and it was not until September 
19, 1908, that it was possible to occupy the Deanery. As 
the work progressed much more extensive alterations and 
additions were made than at first contemplated because of 
the very unsatisfactory conditions found to exist in the orig- 
inal building. The house was originally one of three cot- 
tages on the property purchased by the Founder of the Col- 
lege, and had already been added to twice, the second time 
having been partially rebuilt. In view of the fact that these 
alterations and additions were made without expense to the 
college and were to become its property in the future, the 
Board voted not to increase the rent or the charge for light- 
ing and heating the Deanery during the occupancy of the 
President of the College. The rebuilding of the Deanery 
afforded an opportunity to improve the grounds around it 
by terraces and an enclosed garden with two fountains. Mr. 
George Archer of Baltimore was employed as architect, and 
Mr. Lockwood de Forest was called in consultation in mat- 
ters of artistic architectural details. Mr. de Forest also car- 
ried out the interior decoration. The garden was designed 



33 

by Mr. John C. Olmsted, of the firin of Messrs. Olmsted & 
Olmsted of Brookline, Massachusetts. 

In my last report I called attention to the almost unen- 
durable conditions and overcrowding in the old gymnasium 
which will be entirely remedied in the new gymnasium. 
Similar conditions in the college infirmary which I also 
called attention to still continue to exist. This infirmary 
was originally built in 1887 for a small physical laboratory. 
It consisted of only one room, 48 feet by 25% feet by 13 
feet in height, without a basement. It has since been sub- 
divided into two wards with two beds each, a small nurses' 
room, and a bathroom. We are wholly unable to care prop- 
erly for students who are ill because of insufficient room. 
In one single week of last year there were two students with 
mumps cared for by a special nurse in one ward, two students 
with measles cared for by a special nurse in the other ward, 
one student in the Bryn Mawr Hospital, and one student 
taking a rest cure in a private hospital at Rosemont for 
each of whom we were paying $25 a week out of our infirm- 
ary fund; and in addition to these cases we were caring for 
in two separate halls of residence each with a special nurse 
two cases of threatened aj)pendicitis, and were isolating, also 
with a special nurse in a third hall of residence, another 
student with tonsilitis. It was therefore a great gratifica- 
tion as well as a great relief to hear from a Committee of 
the Class of 1905 which called on the President of the Col- 
lege last June that the Class of 1905 had decided to raise 
$25,000 for a new infirmary as a gift to the college to cele- 
brate their fifth class reunion. Plans for this infirmary are 
now being prepared by Mr. de Forest and Mr. Soule, and a 
site has been selected by the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds on the lower part of the Cartref property with an 
entrance on the Ghilph Eoad which combines everything 
needed for an infirmary site — a southern exposure with 
sun during the entire day in the wards, private rooms, and 
living rooms, wide views from all the windows, four sun 
terraces, perfect quiet, and convenient access from the 
campus. 



34 

If the Class of 1905 is successful in raising money for 
an infirmary it will be the largest gift ever given to the 
college by a single class. The Class of 1901 gave a foun- 
tain to the Library which cost $1,000, the Class of 1899 has 
raised $1,000 for a clock for the library reading room, the 
Class of 1893 has given the sum of $515.83 for the purchase 
of books for the English department, and the Class of 
1902 has given $500 to the Library as a fund for books. It 
will mean a great deal for the future of the college when 
the separate classes return each year for their reunions bring- 
ing to their alma mater gifts of buildings, library and labora- 
tory funds for the purchase of books and apparatus, and 
above all, endowments for class readerships, or class associate- 
ships or even for class professorships, or endowment for 
general academic purposes. Gifts such as these which would 
mean only comparatively little self-denial on the part of each 
individual member of a class would be of untold value to 
the college and would enable it to continue its unique work 
for the higher education of women with far more than its 
present efficiency. 

During the summer the ceiling of the large reading room 
of the library was decorated by Mr. Joseph A. Skelly accord- 
ing to the plans, and under the supervision of Mr. Lockwood 
de Forest. The suggestion of the design was taken by Mr. 
de Forest from a beam ceiling decorated with oriental pat- 
terns in gold and color in Messina, Sicily. It is modelled 
on the geometrical plaster or flat carved wood designs of 
the Jacobean gothic ceilings of the period of the library. 
The forty-two panels of the ceiling are of a deep red design 
on an Indian blue background. The work has been carried 
out on the principle of the frescoes of the sixteenth century 
in the hope that it may prove to have something of their 
permanency. All the beams and cross beams are decorated 
with a stencil on blue which forms the background, the metal 
leaf forming the ornament. About 100,000 leaves of metal 
leaf have been used to gild the beams. In time the metal 
will assume the rich tone of old gold. The effect is very 



35 

beautiful and recalls the painted 'gdthic ceilings, which, were 
so much used in English architecture of the time, without 
being a copy of any known example. The directors accepted 
Mr. de Forest's contract price of $2,500 for this decoration, 
but as he was able to complete it for $2,133 he asked the 
directors to allow him to expend the surplus in recoloring 
the walls of the reading room to tone with the ceiling and 
refinishing the panelling and reading desks in a darker color 
so as to accord with the memorial teakwood screen, and if 
there still remained a surplus after completing these two 
pieces of work he requested permission to decorate the walls 
and ceiling of the entrance hall. These three pieces of decora- 
tion will be completed during the Christmas holidays. The 
$2,500 expended in completing the library decoration was 
made up of the unexpended balances of the subscriptions 
given for the library by the original donors and of an addi- 
tional gift from the Alumnse Association amounting to 
$485.54, being the surplus subscriptions received from 
alumnae for the library building. 

Very little other work on the buildings and grounds was 
done during the year, as every effort was made to keep down 
expenses. 

A new office for the Business Manager was made on the 
first floor of Taylor Hall adjoining the front door by re- 
moving the comptroller's office to the room next to the 
bursar's office which has been used as a cloak room for the 
women of the faculty. The professors' interview room at 
the opposite end of the building which is rarely, if ever, 
used for purposes of consultation was subdivided into two 
large cloak rooms, one for the men, and one for the women 
of the faculty. 

A bathroom was added to the suite of the Warden of 
Radnor Hall so as to make her suite similar to those of the 
other wardens, a student's single room being used for the 
purpose. 

The Students' Building Committee leased Cartref for 
three years and put in two additional bathrooms at the cost 



36 

of $364.43. They also subdivided the two lower floors into 
two flats, and paid half the cost of papering the house. 
It will now form one of the three houses' run by the Com- 
mittee as the Students' Inn. The Committee also purchased 
for $32,500 from the estate of the late Robert F. Kennedy 
the house known as Llanberis and about 1*4 acres of land, 
adjoining the two college houses Cartref and Dolgelley. This 
property has been rented by the college and later by the 
Committee for a number of years. The purchase is a very 
important one as it protects the college front. Llanberis and 
the college properties of Cartref and Dolgelley now form a 
continuous piece of land facing Pembroke Hall, stretching 
form the Gulph Road to Lombard Avenue. 

During the year covered by my report the Commis- 
sioners of Lower Merion Township have compelled the col- 
lege to connect all its buildings with the township sewer 
at a cost of $5,667.84 and to pay an annual sewer rental 
of $1,174.68. The President of the College and the Business 
Manager met the Commissioners twice and had repeated 
conferences with the township engineer in a fruitless attempt 
to have the order to connect rescinded, or, if this were im- 
possible, the annual rental reduced. We were able to secure 
only a twenty per cent annual reduction on account of clos- 
ing the halls of residence during the summer. 

The directors approved of the suggestion of the Assist- 
ant to the President that the college catalogue should be 
published by the college in four parts, Part 1, Plans and 
Descriptions, Part 2, Register of Alumnae and Former Stu- 
dents, Part 3, Graduate Courses, Part 4, Undergraduate and 
Graduate Courses, in order to secure the second class postal 
rates of one cent a pound. They appointed her the official 
publisher of the college publications. 

The State Federation of Pennsylvania Women held a 
meeting in Taylor Hall on Wednesday afternoon, October 
30, 1907, and were given tea in Pembroke Hall. About 
500 ladies accepted the invitation of the college. 

The Alumnse Association of Bryn Mawr held its annual 



37 

meeting at the college in February.* After the meeting the 
Alumnse Association lunched at the Students' Inn on the 
invitation of the college. 

The Transatlantic Society of Philadelphia gave a tea 
on the Bryn Mawr College campus on Saturday afternoon, 
May 16, 1908, to the International Peace and Arbitration 
Conference which was meeting in Philadelphia. 

The Endowment Fund Committee of the Philadelphia 
Branch of the Alumnae Association gave a tea on the campus 
on Saturday afternoon, May 23, 1908. 

The annual conferring of degrees took place on June 
6th, the address being delivered by President Arthur T. Had- 
ley, on "The Relation between College Education and Gen- 
eral Culture." Eighty-one students received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. Five students received the degree of 
Master of Arts ; all having received the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts from Bryn Mawr College in 1907. Four students 
were recommended for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

The attention of the directors is especially called to the 
full information in regard to the working of the college 
during the past year given in the appendices to this report. 
The appendices contain a list of reappointments and changes 
in the instructors and officers for the year 1908-09 ; a list 
of the fellowships and scholarships awarded for the year 
1908-09 ; the names of candidates receiving degrees during 
the year; a list of the speakers who have addressed the 
college ; a list of the college preachers during the year ; the 
gifts made to the college during the year; the titles of 
the scientific publications of the faculty during the year; 
a tabular summary of the courses of instruction ; and reports 
made to the President of the College by the Assistant to the 
President, the Dean of the College, the Appointment Sec- 
retary, the Librarian, the Director of Athletics and Gym- 
nastics, the Attending Physician of the College, and the 
Visiting Physician of the College. 

Respectfully submitted, 
December 18, 1908. M. Carey Thomas. 



38 



Report of the Assistant to the President. 
To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to submit to you a statistical report on 
the students of Bryn Mawr College for the academic year 
1907-08, and also an account of the regulations of the direc- 
tors and faculty which were administered through my office. 

The entire number of students enrolled during the year 
was 420. There were seventy-two graduate students includ- 
ing fellows. The number of graduates was over 17 per cent 
of the whole number of students. 

I. Comparative Table of Number of Graduate and Under- 
graduate Students from 1885 to 1908. 

Graduate Undergraduate Total 

Year. Students. Students. Number. 

1885-86 8 36 44 

1886-87 10 54 64 

1887-88 8 70 78 

1888-89 16 100 116 

1889-90 22 100 122 

1890-91 12 120 132 

1891-92 27 142 169 

1892-93 34 168 202 

1893-94 43 200 243 

1894-95 49 234 283 

1895-96 52 246 298 

1896-97 46 243 289 

1897-98 49 275 324 

1898-99 67 287 354 

1899-1900 53 334 387 

1900-01 48 348 396 

1901-02 53 383 436 

1902-03 70 377 447 

1903-04 62 384 446 

1904-05 63 378 441 

1905-06 79 377 456 

1906-07 75 362 437 

1907-08 72 348 420 



39 

Statistics of Graduate Students. 

II. Geographical Distribution of Graduate Students. 

The seventy-two graduate students enrolled during the 
year came from the following states and countries : 

Pennsylvania 31 Alabama 1 

Connecticut 3 California 1 

Indiana 3 Kansas 1 

Massachusetts 3 Maine 1 

New J ersey 3 Mississippi 1 

New York 3 North Carolina 1 

Ohio 3 South Carolina 1 

Wisconsin 3 Oklahoma 1 

Maryland 2 Canada 4 

Missouri . 2 — 

Nebraska 2 72 

Ehode Island 2 

These seventy-two graduate students may be classified 
as follows : four non-resident, holding European fellowships, 
three studying abroad while one has deferred the holding of' 
the fellowship ; eight resident fellows ; twenty-four graduate 
scholars ; six members of the college staff, and thirty grad- 
uate students holding no official appointment from the college. 
Forty-nine were resident and twenty-three non-resident. 

III. Number of Years of Graduate Study. 

35 in their first year of graduate study. 

17 in their second year of graduate study. 

3 in their third year of graduate study. 

7 in their fourth year of graduate stuay. 

3 in their fifth year of graduate study. 
2 in their sixth year of graduate study. 

4 in their eighth year of graduate study. 
1 in her ninth year of graduate study. 



40 

IV. Studies Elected by 68 Graduate Students in Residence. 

Under each subject all of the graduate students elect- 
ing work in that subject are included. 

Students. Percentage. 

English 25 36.76 

Latin 13 19.11 

Greek 11 16.17 

Art and Archaeology 11 16.17 

German and Teutonic Phil- 
ology 10 14.70 

French and Romance Phil- 
ology 10 14.70 

Mathematics 6 8.82 

Chemistry 5 7.35 

Economics 5 7.35 

History 5 7.35 

Physics 5 7.35 

Philosophy 4 5.88 

Semitic Languages and Bibli- 
cal Literature 4 5.88 

Italian 3 4.41 

Spanish 2 2.94 

Biology 2 2.94 

Law 1 1.47 



Statistics of Undergraduate Students. 

V. Geographical Distribution of Undergraduate Students. 

The 348 undergraduate students enrolled during the 
past year came from the following states and countries. 

Students. Percentage. 

Pennsylvania 125 35.92 

New York 56 16.09 

Illinois 31 8.91 

Massachusetts 22 6.32 

Maryland 17 4.89 



41 

* "■» Students. Percentage. 

New Jersey 14 4.02 

Ohio 11 3.16 

Indiana 5 1.43 

Nebraska 5 1.43 

Virginia 5 1.43 

Connecticut 4 1.15 

Michigan 4 1.15 

Minnesota 4 1.15 

Washington, D. C 4 1.15 

Wisconsin 4 1.15 

California 3 .86 

Iowa 3 .86 

Missouri 3 .86 

Khode Island 3 .86 

Arkansas 2 .57 

Colorado 2 .57 

Delaware 2 .57 

Montana 2 .57 

Texas 2 .57 

South Carolina 2 .57 

Florida 1 .29 

Kansas 1 .29 

Louisiana 1 .29 

Mississippi 1 .29 

Nevada 1 .29 

New Hampshire 1 .29 

Oregon 1 .29 

Tennessee 1 .29 

Wyoming 1 .29 

Hawaii 2 .57 

France 1 .29 

Turkey 1 .29 

Total 348 

These 348 undergraduates may be classified as follows : 
312 resident, 36 non-resident; 344 candidates for a degree, 
4 hearers. 



42 

Of the 344 candidates for a degree 83 were seniors, 
of these one received her degree in February and 77 in June ; 
84 were juniors; 88 were sophomores; 89 were freshmen. 

In addition to those who graduated 41 undergraduates 
left during the year or at its close for the following reasons: 

ISTo intention of taking degree 8 



On account of illness 6 

Needed at home 5 

Financial reasons 3 

Heavily conditioned 3 

To return after one semester 2 

To study music 2 

To return after one year 1 

To study painting 1 

To study in England 1 

To attend another college near her home. . 1 

To travel 2 

To get married 1 

To return to former college 1 

Excluded from degree by merit law 1 

Expelled by Senate 1 

Expelled by Self-Government 1 

Special student 1 

41 

The students who left were members of the following 
classes : Seniors, 1 ; Juniors, 10 ; Sophomores, 19 ; Freshmen, 
11. 

Statistics of Graduate and Undergraduate Students. 
The distribution of the 420 graduate and undergraduate 
students in residence among the several departments is given 
in Appendix IX. 

VI. Denominational Affiliations of Graduate and Under- 
graduate Students. 

Affiliations. Graduate. Undergraduate. Total. 

Episcopalian 13 127 140 

Presbyterian 16 92 108 

Congregational 12 16 28 



43 

Affiliations. Graduate t 

Unitarian 3 

Methodist 7 

Friends 5 

Jewish 1 

Baptist 3 

Roman Catholic 1 

Lutheran 2 

Universalist 

Dutch Reformed 

Christian Science 

Moravian 2 

Reformed Episcopalian . . 1 

German Reformed 1 

Protestant Reformed .... 1 

Church of Christ 1 

United Presbyterian 

Reformed Jewish 

]STo church affiliation 3 

72 348 420 

Statistics of Senior Class. 
At Commencement, June, 1908, the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts was conferred on 81 students, one of whom completed 
the requirements in February, 1908. Their courses may be 
analysed as follows: 

VII. Length of Course of Senior Class. 



Undergraduate. 


Total. 


19 


22 


11 


18 


12 


17 


13 


14 


11 


14 


9 


10 


6 


8 


7 


7 


4 


4 


3 


3 





2 


1 


2 


1 


2 





1 





1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


14 


17 



Number of 
Students. 


Years Spent 
on Course. 


Entered. 


Semesters absent 
from College. 


67 


4 


October, 1904 





2 


4y 2 


February, 1904 





4 


5 


October, 1903 





4 


4 


October, 1903 


2 


1 


4% 


October, 1903 





1 


5 


October, 1902 


2 


1 


4 


October, 1900 


8 


1 


5 


October, 1900 


6 



81 



44 



99 students entered the college as freshmen in October, 
1904. Of these 67, or 67.7 per cent, graduated after the 
regular four-year course. 

The average age of the class graduating in June was 22 
years and 6.6 months. 

The median age of the class graduating in June was 22 
years and 2 months. 



VIII. Groups Elected by the Senior Class. 



History and Economics 

and Politics 18 

Greek and Latin 8 

Latin and English 8 

Latin and Erench 6 

Latin and German 5 

English and Philosophy. 5 
Economics and Politics 

and Philosophy 5 

German and French ... 4 

Latin and Mathematics. . 3 

English and Erench .... 3 
French and Italian and 

Spanish 3 

Chemistry and Biology. . 3 



Mathematics and Physics 

Greek and French 

Greek and Mathematics . 

Latin and Italian and 
Spanish 

English and German . . . 

History and Philosophy. 

Philosophy and Mathe- 
matics 

Mathematics and Chem- 
istry 

Chemistry and Geology. . 



1 
1 

81 



lows 



Arranged in order the major subjects chosen are as fol- 



Latin 31 

Economics and Politics. . 23 

History 19 

French 17 

English 17 

Philosophy 12 

Greek 10 

German 10 



Mathematics 8 

Chemistry 5 

Italian and Spanish .... 4 

Biology 3 

Physics 2 

Geology 1 



162 



45 

Statistics of the Freshman Class. 

The Freshman class numbered 96, 94 entering in Oc- 
tober and 2 in February. Eighty-nine were resident and 
seven non-resident. 

IX. Table of Conditions of Freshman Class. 

Entering in Entering in 
October. February. 

Clear 35 

Clear except punctuation or spelling. 13 

1 condition 11 

2 conditions 6 

3 conditions 9 

4 conditions 6 

5 conditions 5 

Honorable dismissal from other col- 
leges 9 

Total 94 2 

Freshmen entering the college without conditions, 41.18 
per cent of those entering on examination; entering with 
conditions in punctuation or spelling, 15.30 per cent; 
56.48 per cent entering with no conditions except punctuation 
or spelling; conditioned in punctuation, 24; conditioned in 
spelling, 8. 

From the following table it will be seen that the per- 
centage of students entering with no conditions continues to 
rise. 

X. Comparative Table of Percentage of Freshmen Entering 

Without Matriculation Conditions, October, 

1890— October, 1907. 

This table includes only those entering in October of 
each year and takes no account of conditions in punctuation 
and spelling. Up to 1897 the proportion of students enter- 
ing free from conditions to all the entering students, includ- 
ing honorable dismissal students, was taken. After 1897 the 



46 

students who entered on honorable dismissal were not counted 
in taking the percentage. It is therefore misleading to com- 
pare the two sets of percentages. 

In 1890 25.0% In 1899 31.73% 

In 1891 22.8% In 1900 38.78% 

In 1892 32.0% In 1901 40.52% 

In 1893 23.1% In 1902 37.97% 

In 1894 19.3% In 1903 35.29% 

In 1895 19.0% In 1904 50.00% 

In 1896 21.8% In 1905 54.81% 

In 1897 31.8% In 1906 53.48% 

In 1898 26.9% In 1907 56.48% 

XI. Table of Preparatory Schools that Prepared 
87 Freshmen. 

(Arranged according to sections of country in which the 
college offers matriculation scholarships. Nine Freshmen 
entered by honorable dismissal from other colleges.) 

New England States: 

Rosemary Hall, Greenwich Conn 3 

Miss Winsor's School, Boston, Mass 2 

Miss Ingol's School, Cambridge, Mass 2 

The Cambridge Latin School, Cambridge, Mass. ... 1 

The High School, Abington, Mass 1 

The High School, Hanover, 1ST. H 1 

Miss Hazard's School, Boston, Mass 1 

The Lee School, Cambridge, Mass 1 

The Lincoln School, Providence, R. I 1 

The High School, Nashua, K H 1 

14 

1st Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the Lin- 
coln School, Providence, R. I. 

2nd Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the Cam- 
bridge Latin School, Cambridge, Mass. 



47 

New York, New Jersey, and Delaware: 

The Veltin School, New York City 4 

Brearlej School, New York City 3 

The Balliol School, Utica, N. Y 2 

Miss Spence's School, New York City 2 

The Asbury Park High School, Asbury Park, 1ST. J. . 1 

The Auburn High School, Auburn, N. Y 1 

The Bennett School, Irvington on Hudson, N. Y. . . 1 

The Brockport Normal School, Brockport, N. Y. . . 1 

The Dwight School, Englewood, N. J. . . 1 

Heathcote Hall, Scarsdale, N. Y 1 

Mt. Vernon High School, Mt. Vernon, N. Y 1 

The Misses Bayson's School, New York City 1 

The High School, Bochester, N. Y 1 

St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y 1 

21 

1st and 2nd Matriculation Scholarships won by pupils 
of the Brearley School, New York City. 



Western States: 

Girls' Latin School, Chicago, 111 2 

Girton School, Winnetka, 111 2 

Milwaukee-Downer College 2 

Miss Anable's School, Chicago, 111 1 

Bartholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati, 1 

The Chicago Latin School, Chicago, 111, 1 

The Central High School, Cleveland, 1 

The High School, Decatur, 111 1 

The High School, Dubuque, la 1 

The Francis Parker School, Chicago, 111 1 

The Kenwood Institute, Chicago, 111 1 

The Girls' Classical School, Indianapolis, Ind 1 

The High School, Pasadena, Cal 1 

The University School for Girls, Chicago, 111 1 

17 



48 

1st Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the Bar- 
tholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati, O. 

2nd Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the High 
School, Dubuque, la. 

Pennsylvania and Southern States: 

The Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Penna. . . 12 

The Girls' High School, Philadelphia 8 

The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Penna 5 

The Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md 5 

The Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Penna. . 3 

The Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Penna 2 

The High School, Allegheny, Penna 1 

The Birmingham School, Birmingham, Penna 1 

The High School, Danville, Penna 1 

The Friends' School, Germantown, Philadelphia. . . 1 

The Friends' Central School, Philadelphia 1 

The Misses Hebbs' School, Wilmington, Del 1 

The Holman School, Philadelphia 1 

The Holton-Arms School, Washington, D. C 1 

The Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia 1 

Mercer Academy, Mercer, Penna 1 

Miss Morris's School, Richmond, Va 1 

The Thurston Preparatory School, Pittsburgh, 

Penna 1 

Pennsylvania State College 1 

Westminster School, Richmond, Va 1 

Wilkes-Barre Institute, Wilkes-Barre, Penna 1 

50 

1st Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the Girls' 
High School, Philadelphia. 

2nd Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the Bald- 
win School, Philadelphia. 

Private tuition 18 

Honorable dismissal from other colleges 9 

Total 129 



49 

In the above list duplicates are included, some students 
having received their preparation at two or more schools, and 
also bj private tuition. 

XII. Preparation Received in Private or Public Schools. 

Entered in In 

October February 

Private Schools only 48 2 

Private Schools and Private Tuition. 9 

Private Tuition 1 

Public Schools only 15 

Private and Public Schools 4 

Public Schools and Private Tuition. 6 
Public Schools, Private Schools and 

Private Tuition 2 

Honorable Dismissal 9 

94 2 

Percentage of Freshmen entering by examination in Oc- 
tober who have received preparation for college only in pri- 
vate schools or by private tuition equals 68 per cent; the 
percentage of those who studied only in public schools was 18. 

XIII. Geographical Distribution of Freshman Class. 

Percentage. 

Pennsylvania 28 29.17 

New York 17 17.70 

Illinois 13 13.54 

Massachusetts 6 6.25 

Maryland 4 4.16 

Nebraska 3 3.12 

New Jersey 3 3.12 

Ohio 3 3.12 

District of Columbia 2 2.08 

New Hampshire 2 2.08 

Virginia 2 2.08 

Wisconsin 2 2.08 

California 1 1.04 



50 

Percentage. 

Colorado 1 1.04 

Delaware 1 1.04 

Louisiana 1 1.04 

Indiana 1 1.04 

Iowa 1 1.04 

Missouri 1 1.04 

Nevada 1 1.04 

Oregon 1 1.04 

Khode Island 1 1.04 

Tennessee 1 1.04 

96 

In all 22 states and the District of Columbia are repre- 
sented. 



XI V. Denominational Affiliations of the Freshman Class. 

Episcopalian 38 Reformed Jewish 1 

Presbyterian 25 German Reformed 1 

Unitarian 8 Dutch Reformed 1 

Friends 3 Baptist 1 

Congregational 3 United Presbyterian ... 1 

Jewish 3 No church affiliation .... 8 

Methodist Episcopalian.. 2 — 

Reformed Episcopalian.. 1 96 



XV. Average and Median Age of the Freshman Class. 

Years Months 

Average age of class entering in October 18 9 

Median age of class entering in October 18 8 

Average age of class entering in February 20 5 

Median age of class entering in February 20 2 

Average age (excluding honorable dismissal stu- 
dents) 18 8 

Median age (excluding honorable dismissal stu- 
dents) 18 4 



51 

XVI. Groups Registered by FresTimen on Entering College. 

Greek and Latin 7 German and Trench .... 2 

Greek and English 4 Mathematics and Physics 2 

Latin and Mathematics . . 4 English and Philosophy . 1 

History and Economics. . 3 French and Spanish .... 1 

Latin and German 2 — 

Latin and French 2 28 

29.2 per cent of the Freshman class registered groups on 
entering the college. 

XVII. Occupations of Parents of Freshman Class. 
Professions. 

Physicians (1 Medical Director of Life Insur- 
ance Co.) 11 

Lawyers (2 Judges) 11 

Teachers (3 Professors) 6 

Clergymen 1 

Missionary Workers 1 

Army 1 

Musician 1 

Technical Engineers 2 

Architects 1 

— 35 
Business and Commerce. 

Merchants (Eetail 5 ; Wholesale 5) 10 

Business Managers and Officials (2 Presidents 

of Companies, 1 Vice-President) 10 

Manufacturers 9 

Insurance 3 

Bankers 3 

Real Estate and Builders 2 

Stockbrokers 1 

Editor 1 

Farmers 2 

— 41 
No Professions or Business 2 

Total 78 

Deceased 18 



52 

Action of the Merit Law. 

On the result of the examinations held in January, 1908, 
. one student was excluded from a degree. This student at the 
close- of her Junior year in June, 1907, had received a grade 
below merit on 59 out of the 120 hours required for the 
degree. She was placed on probation under the rule requir- 
ing her to take five years for her degree, but she fell below 
the requirements for the degree in January, 1908. 

One other Junior who was placed on probation in June, 
1907, left college, having planned to stay only three years. 

After the examinations at the end of the first semester 
two students, one having attended for six and the other for 
seven semesters, were placed on probation. Both these stu- 
dents left college in June, 1908. 

After the examinations at the close of the second se- 
mester four students, all at the close of their Junior year, 
were placed on probation. 

The students who remained on probation improved the 
quality of their work in a most marked degree, and four who 
had remained under the care of the Petition Committee for 
two years graduated in June, 1908. 

Since the five-year merit rule first came into action for 
the class of 1907 twenty students have been placed on proba- 
tion, four of these have graduated, eight have left college, 
three have been excluded from the degree, and five remain 
on probation. 



Registration of Attendance on the First Day of Each 
Semester and Before and After Vacations. 

Students are required to register eight times in the 
college year, as shown by the following table, and cases of 
failure to register are investigated by the office and reported 
to the Petition Committee. 



53 



XV III. Table of Cases of -Failure to Register. 

Failed to register For 
on account of other 
illness. reasons. 

Beginning of the college year 1 

Before the Thanksgiving vacation ... 2 2 

After the Thanksgiving vacation .... 5 1 

Before the Christmas vacation 9 

After the Christmas vacation 15 7 

Beginning of the second semester 12 2 

Before the Easter vacation 7 2 

After the Easter vacation 7 5 

Total 58 19 

Respectfully submitted, 

Isabel Maddison, 
Assistant to the President. 



54 



Eeport of the Dean of the College on Illness and Attendance 

on Lectures. 

To tJie President: Madam, 

The following summary is made from the illness cards 
which are filled out weekly by the students, endorsed by the 
Warden of the hall, and filed in the office of the Dean of the 
College. All excuses for non-attendance at lectures and de- 
ferred college papers are given from these records ; therefore 
the illnesses tabulated represent only those illnesses which 
have prevented the students from performing their regular 
college work. 

Registration of Illness. 

Number of undergraduates included in this report, 344. 

Number reporting illness, 150, or 43.6 per cent of whole. 

Seventy-four students, or 21.5 per cent of whole, re- 
ported menstruation as cause for non-attendance at lectures. 
To these students the following excuses were given : 

One excuse on account of illness, 37 students. 
Two excuses on account of illness, 14 students. 
Three excuses on account of illness, 12 students. 
Tour excuses on account of illness, 6 students. 
Five excuses on account of illness, 3 students. 
Seven excuses on account of illness, 2 students. 

This summary, with the reports of the Attending Physi- 
cian, the Visiting Physician, and the Director of Athletics and 
Gymnastics, completes the health report for the academic year. 
Out of 344 undergraduate students 217, or 63 per cent, 
required no excuses from exercise, 194, or 56 per cent, re- 
ported no illness excuses for college work. 

Attention is called to the fact that in many cases the 
same students consulted both the Attending Physician and the 
Visiting Physician, so that there are many duplicates in their 
lists. 



55 

Registration of Attendance at Lectures. 

The attendance of each student was registered as usual 
upon the attendance cards. 

For the first semester out of 344: undergraduate students 
12 were reported as having no cuts. The total number of cuts 
for the whole semester averaged 9.26 hours per student; the 
total number of unexcused .cuts averaged 6.9 hours per stu- 
dent for the whole semester. 

For the second semester out of 346 undergraduate stu- 
dents 3 were reported as having no cuts. The total number of 
cuts for the whole semester averaged 16.64 per student; the 
total number of unexcused cuts averaged 12.42 hours per 
student for the whole semester. 

The discrepancy between the averages of the first and 
second semesters is due to the impossibility of keeping accu- 
rate class lists during the first few weeks of the first semester, 
when the students have not yet definitely registered their 
courses. In considering the rather high average of the second 
semester it is necessary to take into account the fact that a 
large number of students do not fill out excuse cards when 
they are detained from their lectures by a slight illness, and 
that they do not always make them out accurately for the 
whole period of illness. If allowance be made for these 
omissions the average of unexcused cuts falls well below 
ten hours a semester per student. This is the usual number 
allowed in colleges where a rule requiring regular attendance 
at lectures is in operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

]\Iaeion Reilly, 

Dean of the College. 



56 

Report of the Appointment Secretary of the College. 

To the President : Madam, 

I have the honor to submit the following report on 
the work of the Bureau of Appointments during the year 
1907-08 : 

Appointments made by the Bureau. 

Teachers in Schools 9 

Teachers in College 1 

Warden in College Hall 1 

Private Tutors 4 

Secretaries 4 

Substitute Teachers 1 

Private Tutors in summer 3 

Total 23 

Appointments made indirectly, 5. 

Classes of Students who obtained appointments. 

1893 1 

1899 1 

1900 1 

1904 1 

1905 1 

1906 2 

1907 4 

1908 6 

Graduate Students 2 

Students still in College 4 

Total 23 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ethel M. Walker, 
Appointment Secretary. 



57 



Report of the Head Librarian. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to present the following report of the 
work of the Library for the year ending September 30, 1908 : 

Accessions. 

Number of volumes October 1, 1907 52,859 

Number of volumes added: 

By purchase 1,711 

By binding 438 

By exchange 8 

By gift 358 

By replacement 3 

Christian Union 16 

Unknown sources 6 

Total 2,540 

Volumes withdrawn . 76 

Net gain 2,464 

Total volumes in library September 30, 

1908 55,323 

These accessions are divided by classes as 
follows : 

General works 274 

Philosophy 139 

Religion 153 

Social Science 450 

Philology 157 

Science 369 

Useful Arts 36 

Pine Arts '. 20 

Literature 513 

History 425 

Not classed 4 

Total 2,540 



58 

The accessions of the preceding year were 3,497 volumes, 
957 more than the present year. However, the number of 
books added by purchase during the present year was 1,711, 
against 1,515 the year before, the difference between the two 
years being more than covered by the gifts, the David Irons 
collection and the Mary E. Stevens memorial library being 
included in the accessions of the year preceding, as well 
as the entire collection of the Christian Union Library. 

A list of donors to the library with the names of the books 
presented is appended. This list does not include the books 
purchased from gifts of money, these gifts being noted in 
detail in Appendix VI. 

The Kirk collection on Burgundian history is not in- 
cluded in the above statement, nor is the Edmunds collection, 
both deposited in the library, but not yet made a part of it. 
Mr. Edmunds has added to his collection during the year 
until it now numbers : 

Bound volumes 297 

Unbound volumes 213 

Pamphlets (less than 50 pages) 128 

Numbers of periodicals 105 

Cataloguing. 

Titles catalogued 2,458 

Cards written 7,792 

Seminary cards 67 

Continuations 1,594 

Naturally the accessions and cataloguing do not run 
parallel. Eor instance, the David Irons memorial collection 
added the preceding year was catalogued during the present 
year. Books bought from the special fund for Semitic litera- 
ture have fallen within this year's cataloguing, notwithstand- 
ing the fact that the money for their purchase belongs in part 
to the receipts of the preceding year and in part to those of 
the year to follow. 



59 

The recataloguing of the year -Fas confined to the clas3 
300, Social Science, all of which was completed with the 
exception of the general works on the subject and the booka 
on law. 

Miss Goss, the head cataloguer, resigned September 1st, 
and Miss Baker took her place. Miss Bell, assistant cataloguer, 
resigned at the same time, and Miss Jennings has been ap- 
pointed to the post, although she does not commence her 
work till next month. 

In addition to the regular staff of head cataloguer and 
assistant, Miss Jennings has been employed five hours a day 
for eight months as a special cataloguer. We were fortunate, 
too, in securing the services of Miss Baker for the month of 
August, when she worked with Miss Gross. 

The cataloguing staff for the year has numbered one less 
than it did in the previous year. When it is considered that 
that one is Miss Sears, the most experienced member of the 
staff the library has had for years, the work of the cataloguing 
department for the year compared most favorably with that 
of preceding years, being only 900 volumes and 2,500 cards 
less than in 1906-07. 

Working continually under pressure it is no slight task 
to maintain the necessary standard of accuracy and thorough- 
ness while cataloguing as rapidly as desired. As a rule books 
are not ordered until they are needed, and the department is 
constantly called upon to rush them to the shelves for imme- 
diate use. When it is considered that the cataloguing, never 
simple, this year included the David Irons collection, the 
entire Semitic purchase, and the large accessions in modern 
history besides the usual additions, the work of cataloguing 
deserves special commendation. 

Circulation. 

ISTo record is preserved of books issued from departmental 
libraries, nor of books used in the halls of residence, nor of 
those taken from the reserved book room for use in the reading 
room. A record of books drawn from the main library for 
home use has been kept for two years, and is interesting 
chiefly for comparison. The figures are as follows : 



60 



1906-07 1907-08 

October 1,865 3,387 

November 1,575 2,087 

December 1,074 1,533 

January 1,660 1,741 

February 2,614 2,453 

March 1,852 2,219 

April 1,810 1,699 

May 1,527 1,481 



Total 13,977 16,600 

The loan desk for the past year has been in charge of 
Miss Dunn, who served as assistant the preceding year. Miss 
Dunn has been most conscientious in the discharge of her 
duties at this somewhat difficult post. 

There has been a noticeable increase in the number of 
students working in the reading room, although no statistics 
are kept. The privilege of reserving desks from day to day 
has evidently been appreciated. Special attention has been 
called to the fact that students may have books of reference 
brought to the reading room for use. So far not many have 
availed themselves of the privilege. The reference work in 
the library sorely needs developing. The books are here, but 
no provision is made for assisting readers to use them. With 
the present library staff it is impossible to assign any one to 
this important work. The teaching staff of the college do 
much to assist students, but where classes are large little or 
no personal help is possible and it too often happens that 
students go through their entire college course, ignorant of 
the most ordinary reference books. 

A modification of rules was made in June allowing pro- 
fessors, associate professors, and associates to take books from 
seminary libraries and bound periodicals from the stacks for 
periods not exceeding seven days. 

Inventory. 

The biennial inventory taken during the summer of 1907 
was scarcely completed at the date of the last report of the 



61 

librarian. During the year the list has, been repeatedly checked 
with such success that it is more than possible other volumes 
will yet be located. It has seemed wise to consider lost and 
to withdraw from the records all books missing through two 
inventories. This, then, has been done up to 1905, and the 
figures given show the actual conditions. 

As a revision of the report of a year ago I submit the 
following corrected statement. 

Of the 71 volumes missing at the close of the inventory 
of 1905, 44 have since been found, leaving only 27 that 
have been lost for a period of three years or more. In addi- 
tion, there were missing at the close of the inventory of 1907, 
11 accessioned pamphlets, 10 maps, 32 volumes from the main 
and departmental libraries, and 39 volumes from the hall 
libraries, making in all 98 bound volumes, 11 accessioned 
pamphlets, and 10 maps which are still missing. The books 
may be grouped as follows : 

1905. 1907. 

General works 2 

Philosophy 3 

Religion 1 

Social Science 1 1 

Philology 3 4 

Science 1 3 

Literature 13 18 

History 3 6 

Total 27 32 

Hall Libraries. 

Rockefeller 8 volumes. 

Pembroke West 7 

Pembroke East 7 

Denbigh 8 

Radnor 4 

Merion 4 

Non-resident 1 

Total 39 volumes. 



62 

Financial Statement. 

The sums available for the purchase of books, periodicals 

and binding during the past year have been as follows : 

Library Appropriation $3,000.00 

Apportioned as follows : 

Biology 150.00 

Chemistry 150.00 

English 150.00 

French 150.00 

Geology 110.00 

German 150.00 

Greek 150.00 

History 150.00 

Italian 75.00 

Latin 150.00 

Mathematics 150.00 

Philosophy 150.00 

Physics 150.00 

Political Science 150.00 

Reference books 50.00 

Religious books 25.00 

Spanish 75,00 

General literature 75.00 

Library expenses 790.00 

$3,000.00 

Condition Examination Eund $1,794.90 

Apportioned as follows: 

Art 75.00 

Botany 50.00 

Biology 200.00 

Comparative Philology 20.00 

Education 50.00 

Psychology 100.00 

International Catalogue 83.45 

English 150.00 

Italian 150.00 



03 

Chemistry : ;*. $100.00 

Racinet, Le Costume Historique. . . 40.31 

Modern History . . . , 776.14 

Special Funds. 

Sales of books and fines 369.68 

Hall Department Libraries 181.48 

Dr. Rhoads Memorial 61.36 

Class of 1902 25.00 

Ottendorfer fund for purchase of 

German books 200.00 

Gift of Miss Garrett : 

French 30.00 

Latin 135.00 

Graduate French 50.00 

English drama 100.00 

Graduate English 50.00 

Bible and Milton 20.84 

Manuscripts 70.00 

In addition there were available the following balances 
from former years: 

Condition Examination Fund: 

Latin $15.57 

Oriental History 12.24 

Special Funds: 

Class of 1902 (1906-07) 25.00 

Rev. Charles Wood 1.40 

Helen Lee Stevens 29.53 

Russian novelists and H. James. . . 3.49 

Geology 2.73 

American History 3.10 

These small balances have all been closed out, as well as 
the regular funds for the year. The special funds, gifts and 
incomes from gifts, have been closed, with the exception of 
those for Latin and for English drama. Orders outstanding 
will clear these up early in the year. There is a balance of 



64 

$147.17 on the Sale of Books Fund, which balance has been 
reserved for the binding of the British Museum Catalogue 
early in the coming year. 

Building. 

A few minor changes have been made in the arrange- 
ment of the Library. The magazine room proved inadequate 
and the room formerly used as a study room, through which 
readers passed to reach the magazines, has been set aside for 
the newspapers and the more popular magazines. The doors 
between the two rooms were removed, and they are now prac- 
tically one room. 

In the reading room the open wood fires have added much 
to its attractiveness and the open coal fires have made the 
seminary rooms in the north wing more cheerful. 

In the stack room rubber strips have been laid on the 
main floor and rubber tips have been placed on the chairs, 
deadening the noise considerably. Curtains have been hung 
at the ends of aisles, to protect the books from the direct 
sunshine. 

The decoration of the ceiling of the reading room has 
been completed. 

A college book plate has been designed under the direc- 
tion of the Library Committee and also a special book plate 
to acknowledge memorial gifts of books. This book plate has 
been pasted in the Professor David Irons memorial library 
and in the books purchased from the income of the gift of 
the class of 1902. These book plates are being pasted in all 
current accessions. 

Hours of Opening. 

As usual, the library has been open from 8 a. m. till 
10 p. m. during term time, except on Sundays, when it was 
open from 2 to 10 p. m. During the Christmas holidays it 
was closed at 6 p. m., and on Sundays, Christmas Day, and 
ISTew Year's Day all day. It was also closed on Thanksgiving 
Day. During the spring holiday it remained open as in term 
time, except that on Easter Sunday it was closed until 
evening. 



65 

During the summer vacation the closing hour, as in years 
past, was five o'clock, except on Saturdays, when it closed at 
noon. An order of the Library Committee directing that it 
close at six did not reach the librarian until the vacation 
was over. 

Members of the regular staff of the library were in 
charge of all the desks until seven o'clock, after this hour 
student assistants have been employed. The reserved book 
room has been closed on Sundays, as usual, and on week-days 
the attendant at the loan desk has had charge of both desks 
from six till seven every evening. 

General Administration. 

Few changes have been made in the methods of admin- 
istration. The appointment of a regular office assistant has 
been the only change on the staff. Miss Wagenhurst, who 
had been connected with the library for six years, during five 
of which she had charge of the loan desk, was appointed to 
this post. Iter duties include most of the typewriting of the 
library, the checking and care of serials, the oversight of the 
seminary rooms, and the housekeeping of the building gen- 
erally. She has been of great service to the acting librarian. 

Following the advice of the head librarian, orders for 
foreign books have been placed quite generally with G. E. 
Stechert & Co., of ISTew York, instead of with firms abroad, 
as was done formerly. Miss Mudge had not fully tested the 
plan, but a few tests during the year were quite convincing. 
In April the order for continuations was placed with the ]STew 
York firm. The one gain is in promptness of delivery, this 
being due, not to negligence on the part of the foreign firms, 
but to the necessity of combining orders to save on transporta- 
tion. This delay, added to the continual delays in the cus- 
toms offices, proved a constant annoyance. ISTo contract has 
of course been made with the ISTew York importers, and we 
are quite free to buy in the open market whenever it seems 
advisable. 

The departmental and hall libraries have been in charge 
of fellows of the college, under the supervision of Miss Wagen- 



66 

hurst. There being no fellows in Geology and Biology, Dr. 
Bascom and Dr. Randolph very kindly took charge of their 
departmental libraries through the year. 

The various changes in the staff have been noted in con- 
nection with the statements of work accomplished. It remains 
to record the resignation of the Head Librarian, Miss Isadore 
Gilbert Mudge, and the appointment of the acting librarian 
to the vacancy, which appointment took effect September 1st. 

In closing, permit me again to commend the faithful as- 
sistance of the library staff, and to thank you for your cordial 
co-operation in carrying on the work through a particularly 
difficult year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary L. Jones, 

Librarian. 



67 



Gifts to Bryn Maivr College Library, 1907-08. 

Mr. Frank Allaben : John Watts De Peyster. 

American Book Company: Baldwin & Paul, English 
Poems. 

Dean Clarence D. Ashley : Anson, Law of Contract. Two 
copies. 

Mr. Thomas Willing Balch : Balch, Balch Genealogica ; 
The Alaskan Frontier. 

Professor George A. Barton: Barton, Origin of Some 
Cuneiform Signs. 

Professor Florence Bascom: Forty-seven miscellaneous 
pamphlets. 

Miss Cora A. Benneson: Peabody Museum, Memoirs, 
Vol. 4, No. 1 ; subscription to "Science." 

Mr. Charles Bradley: Bradley, Miscellaneous writings. 

The Rev. J. F. Brodie : Palmer, Life of Alice Freeman 
Palmer. 

Professor Carleton Fairchild Brown : Adams, Syntax of 
the Temporal Clause in Old English Prose. 

Miss Anna M. Carrere: Hobbes, Leviathan; Bakewell, 
Source Book in Ancient Philosophy. 

Doubieday, Page & Co. : Garden and Farm Almanac, 
1908. 

Mr. Albert J. Edmunds : Westonian, November, 1907. 

Mr. Clarence Errol Ferree: Ferree, Intermittance of 
Minimal Visual Sensations ; An experimental examination of 
the phenomena usually attributed to fluctuation of attention. 

Miss Margaret Franklin : Palmer, Life of Alice Freeman 
Palmer; Baldwin, Mental Development. 

Mr. H. A. Henderson : Ingalese, R. and I., Cosmogony 
and Evolution ; From Incarnation to Reincarnation. 

Professor Richard Thayer Holbrook : Borghesi, Petrarch 
and his Influence on English Literature ; Borghesi, Boccaccio 
and Chaucer ; Ten Eyck, Government for the People ; Cobb, 
Influence of E. T. A. Hoffmann on the Tales of Edgar 
Allan Poe. 



68 

Mr. Edgar Huidekoper : Wilbur, The Independent Con- 
gregational Church of Meadville, Pa. 

Mr. W. A. Ingham: Cicero, Opera, 1783, 10 vols. 

Professor Kobert M. Johnston : Johnston, Leading Am- 
erican Soldiers; Johnston, Napoleonic Empire in Southern 
Italy. 

Mr. Lewis C. Ledyard: Carter, Law, Its Origin, 
Growth and Function. 

Dr. Henry Carey Lea : Academy of Natural Sciences, 
Journal, v. 13, no. 3, 4 ; Proceedings, 1907 3 , 1908 1 ; Trans- 
actions, n. s. v. 21, pts. 4-5. 

Dr. Frederick S. Lee : Lee, Studies in Physiology. 

Le Due de Loubat: Cours d'antiquites Americaines 
du College de France — Legon inaugurale de M. L. Capitan, 
charge du cours. 

Mr. Theodore Marburg: Marburg, The Panic and the 
Present Depression. 

Miss Isadore G. Mudge : Bagehot, Shakespeare the Man. 

Mr. Isaac P. ISToyes : Noyes, Evangeline ; Ode to Man. 

Mr. John B. Peaslee: Peaslee, Thoughts and Experi- 
ences in and out of School. 

Professor George Lansing Raymond : Raymond, Ballads 
and Other Poems; A Life in Song; The Aztec God and 
other Dramas. 

Miss Sarah A. Scull: Gardner, Handbook to Greek 
Sculpture, Appendix. 

Mr. Frank Preston Stearns: Stearns, Cambridge 
Sketches ; True Republicanism ; Life and Public Services of 
George Luther Stearns; Life of Hawthorne; Life of Prince 
Otto von Bismarck. 

G. E. Stechert & Co. : Hinrich's Halbjahrs-Katalog, 
1907, pt. 1, and pt. 2. 

President M. Carey Thomas: Hibbert Journal, vols. 
1-6 ; Matthews, Short Story ; Meylan, La coeducation des 
sexes ; Shepard, Organic Changes and Feeling ; Mascart, 
Observations simultanees de la surface de Jupiter ; Report on 
the Moseley Education Commission ; Annals of the American 
Academy, Jan., 1908 ; Catalogue de la bibliotheque de feu 
Brunetiere. 



69 

Miss Mary Tremain : Tremainy Slavery in the District 
of Columbia. 

Miss Helen Tufts: Born, Whitman's Ideal Democracy. 

M. Hugues Vaganay : XI Sonnets de Pierre de Rosnard. 

The Hon. Irving P. Wanger: U. S. Senate — Consti- 
tutional Eules and Manual, 1905 ; Statistical Abstract of 
U. S., 1905 ; U. S. Geological Survey, Professional Papers, 
No. 37, 38, 39, 43 ; Gettysburg National Park Commission, 
1893-04; Eeport of Attorney General, 1905; Report of 
Librarian of Congress, 1905 ; John Paul Jones — Commemo- 
ration; Hygienic Laboratory — Bulletin 35, 41. 

Professor Joseph W. Warren: American Asociation for 
the Advancement of Science, 1904, 1906 ; Harvard Gradu- 
ates Magazine, 6 nos; National Geographic Magazine, 28 
nos. ; TJ. S. Hygienic Laboratory Bulletins, 35, 41 ; Harvard 
University, Reports of the President and Treasurer, 1902-07 ; 
Howell, Textbook of Physiology. 

Dr. S. E, Weber : Weber's Archives — Mutation in Mos- 
quitoes. 

Dr. Talcott Williams : IT. S. Geological and Geographi- 
cal Survey of the Territories (Hayden), Annual Report 
1867-75, v. 1-9, in 7 vols. ; Municipal and Private Operation 
of Public Utilities, Parts 1-2, National Civic Federation Re- 
port ; Hooker, Reminiscences ; Report of Pennsylvania State 
Librarian, 1893. 

Dr. Charles C. Williamson: Williamson, The Finances 
of Cleveland. 

Professor Wilmer Cave Wright : Merlette, La vie et 
l'ceuvre de E. Browning ; Wright, The Campaign of Plataea ; 
Negri, L'imperatore Giuliano l'Apostata ; Koch, Kaiser 
Julian der Abtriinnige ; Bidez et Cumont, Recherches sur la 
tradition manuscrite des lettres de l'empereur Julian ; Asmus, 
Synesius und Dio Chrysostomus ; Brambs, Studien zu den 
Werken Julians des Apostaten, 1 u. 2 Teil ; Schulze, De 
Juliani philosophia et moribus ; Asmus, Julians Brief an 
Oreibasios ; Asmus, Julian unci Dion Chrysostomus. 2 copies. 



70 



Gifts from Institutions and Publishers, 1907-08. 
■ (In the following list exchanges are included.) 

Volumes. Pamphlets. 

American Association for Labor Legislation 1 

American Jewish Historical Society 1 

American Marathi Mission 1 

American Mathematical Society 1 

American School for Oriental Study in 

Palestine 

Analecta Augustiana 

Archaeological Institute of America 

Association for International Conciliation. 

Association of American Universities 

Association of Collegiate Alumnae 

Baptist Missionary Magazine 

Bodleian Library 

Book News Monthly 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts 

Bowdoin College 1 

Bradley Polytechnic Institute 1 

Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences 

Brooklyn Public Library 

Brown University 1 

Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 

Bryn Mawr Record. Weekly 

California Academy of Sciences 

California, University of, Library 2 

Cambridge University Library 

Canada, Department of Agriculture 1 

Canada, Geological Survey (3 maps) 35 

Canada, Interior Department of 2 

Carnegie Institute, Pittsfield, Pa 1 



Carnegie Institution 14 

Carnegie Library of Pittsburg 

Central Conference of American Rabbis. . . 1 
Chicago Northwestern Railway 



3 
9 

4 

12 

5 

3 



1 
63 

1 

98 



18 



71 



Cleveland Public Library 

Cleveland, Public Works, Department of . . 1 

College of Science and Engineering, Kyoto, 
Japan 1 

Columbia University 

Conference for Education in the South. ... 1 

Cornell University 2 

Deaconess Advocate 

Evanston Public Library 

Eirst Church of Christ, New York City. . 

Friends Missionary Advocate 

George Washington University 

Georgia Geological Survey 

Groningen, University of 

Hartford Seminary Record 

Harvard University, Jefferson Physical Lab- 
oratory . 2 

Harvard University Library 1 

Henry Phipps Institute 2 

Hobart College 1 

Illinois State Laboratory 

Indiana Geological Survey 1 

International Bureau of Amer. Republics . . 3 

Iowa, University of 

Jena University 

John Crerar Library 

Johns Hopkins University 

Lake Mohonk Conference of Eriends of the 
Indian 1 

Lake Mohonk Conference on International 
Arbitration . 1 

The Lantern 

LaPlata, Biblioteca de la Universidad, Re- 
publica Argentina 1 

Liverpool Biological Society 4 

Los Angeles, Chamber of Commerce 1 

Maine, Industrial and Labor Statistics, Bu- 
reau of 1 



Volumes. Pamphlets. 
1 



47 



12 
1 

12 
1 

9 

2 



2 
62 

2 
34 



72 

Volumes. Pamphlets. 

Maryland Geological Survey 1 

Maryland, Statistics, Bureau of 1 

Maryland, Weather Service 1 

Massachusetts Charity, State Board of . . . . 1 
Massachusetts Statistics of Labor, Bureau 

of 2 

Merchants' Association of New York 3 

Merck & Co 2 

Michigan Geological Survey 1 

Michigan State Board of Health 1 2 

Michigan, University of 2 12 

Missouri Botanical Garden 1 

Missouri, University of . . 7 

National American Woman Suffrage Asso- 
ciation 2 

National Arbitration and Peace Conference 1 

National Civic Federation 1 

National Education Association 1 5 

National Metal Trades Association 1 

Nebraska, University of 5 

Newberry Library 1 

New Hampshire State Library 11 4 

New Jersey, Geologist 2 

New Jersey Geological Survey 1 

New Jersey, Labor Statistics, Bureau of . . . 1 

New Orleans Public Library 1 

New York (city) Comptroller 1 

New York (city) Education, Board of . . . . 2 
New York (city) Metropolitan Museum of 

Art 1 12 

New York Public Library 13 

New York (state) Education Department. . 2 10 

New York, Labor, Department of ... 3 

New York, Labor Statistics, Bureau of . . . . 1 

New York (state) Library 4 6 

New York (state) Museum 2 5 

Oberlin College 1 

Ohio Society of New York 1 



73 

Volumes. Pamphlets. 

Open Shop '. / 12 

Paris, Ministere de l'instruction publique. . . 1 

Paris, Universite de 1 

Pennsylvania, Adjutant General 1 

Pennsylvania, Agriculture, Department of . 1 4 

Pennsylvania, Auditor General 1 

Pennsylvania, Banking Commission 3 

Pennsylvania, Factory Inspector 2 

Pennsylvania, Fisheries, Department of . . . 1 

Pennsylvania, Health, Board of 1 

Pennsylvania Home Teaching Society for 

the Blind 1 

Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner ... 3 

Pennsylvania Law Review 3 

Pennsylvania, Mines, Department of 1 

Pennsylvania, Public Instruction, Superin- 
tendent of 1 

Pennsylvania, Internal Affairs, Department 

of 3 

Pennsylvania, Public Charities, Board of . . 2 
Pennsylvania, Public Printing, Department 

of 1 

Pennsylvania Regimental Histories 1 

Pennsylvania Sinking Fund 1 

Pennsylvania State College 1 

Pennsylvania State Library 13 18 

Pennsylvania State Treasurer 2 

Pennsylvania, University of 1 1 

Pennsylvania Water Supply Commission. ... 1 

Philadelphia Free Library 1 12 

Portland Academy 1 

Pratt Institute Free Library 12 

Providence Public Library 1 

Queens Borough Public Library 1 

Quincy, Illinois, Free Public Library 1 

Religious Education Association 1 5 

St. Louis Public Library 3 

Smithsonian Institution 9 2 

Sommerville Public Library 1 



74 



Volumes. 



Southern Workman 

Spirit of Missions 

Strassburg, University of 

Swarthmore College 

Syracuse Public Library 

Texas, University of (1 map) 

Toledo Public Library 

Trinity College 

Union League, Philadelphia 

U. S. Agriculture, Department of 

U. S. American Ethnology, Bureau of . . . . 

U. S. Biological Survey 

U. S. Census 

U. S. Chemistry, Bureau of 

U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey 

U. S. Consular Report 

U. S. Commerce and Labor, Department of 

U. S. Documents, Superintendent of 

U. S. Education, Bureau of 

U. S. Entomology, Bureau of 

U. S. Fisheries, Bureau of 

U. S. Forest Service 

U. S. Geological Survey (10 maps) 

U. S. Interstate Commerce Commission . . . 

U. S. Labor, Department of 

U. S. Library of Congress 

U. S. National Museum 

U. S. Plant Industry, Bureau of 

U. S. Senate, Committee on Finance 

U. S. Soils, Bureau of 

U. S. Standards, Bureau of 

U. S. War Department 

U. S. Weather Bureau 

Vanderbilt University Quarterly 

Vivisection Reform Society 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission 

Wisconsin, University of 

Woman's Missionary Friend 

Yale University Library 



1 

8 
1 

3 

2 

2 

27 

2 



Pamphlets. 

12 
12 
62 

1 

1 

7 

1 

1 



12 

11 

4 

12 

9 

20 
3 

68 

52 



10 

2 
26 

1 

7 

12 
4 
2 
9 
23 
12 
1 



75 



Report of the Director of Gymnastics and Athletics. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to make the following report on the 
work of the department of gymnastics and athletics for the 
year 1907-08. 

Physical Examinations and Health. 

Three hundred and nineteen students were examined in 
October, 1907, 313 students were 're-examined in April, 1908. 

Table showing the college average height, weight, 
strength, and lung capacity at these examinations. 

College Average. H ^ ht W || ht Strength Lung Capacity 

October, 1907 161.9 57.5 278 180 

April, 1908 162 58.3 290 183 



American average as stated by Dr. Dudley Sargent : 

Strength Lung Capacity 

kg. c. c. 

235 132 

Table showing class averages. 

Cla<« Avprno-P Height Weight Strength Lung Capacity 

wass Average. cm _ kg _ kg c c 

Class of 1908 : 

October, 1907 161.9 58.1 288 175 

April, 1908 161.9 58. 283.9 176 

Increase Dec. .1 Dec. 4.1 Inc. 1. 

Class of 1909 : 

October, 1907 162 57.3 293. 181 

April, 1908 162.5 58.2 302.9 186 

Increase 5 .9 . 9.9 5. 

Class of 1910: 

October, 1907 161.1 58.6 278 179 

April, 1908 161.1 59. 289.4 182.6 

Increase .4 11.4 3.6 



76 

Class of 1911: 

October, 1907 162.6 56.1 

April, 1908 162.5 58.1 

Decrease 1 Inc. 2. 

Table showing strength of students in each class at first 
and second examinations. 

Number of Students. 



256 


183 


283.9 


189 


27.9 


6 



Tests 






October 






April 






above 




1908 


1909 1910 


1911 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


400 


k*. 


2 


3 1 





4 


3 


4 


2 


350 


" 


6 


3 5 


1 


6 


8 


3 


4 


325 


" 


9 


8 6 


2 


7 


10 


13 


9 


300 


u 


16 


11 12 


9 


14 


10 


11 


14 


Average 275 




16 


15 M 


17 


12 


12 


11 


18 


250 


" 


8 


13 14 


22 


15 


14 


12 


15 


225 


<< 


12 


8 14 


14 


11 


5 


11 


9 


200 


M 


12 


4 8 


11 


9 


2 


5 


3 


175 


« 





1 3 


6 


3 


2 


1 


5 


150 


" 








3 


1 





2 


1 



As will be seen by the above table, the number of stu- 
dents above and below the average at each examination was as 
follows : 







October 






April 






1908 


1909 1910 


1911 


1908 


1909 1910 


1911 


Above 


33 


25 24 


12 


31 


31 31 


29 


Average 


16 


15 14 


17 


12 


12 11 


18 


Below 


32 


26 39 


56 


39 


23 31 


33 



Table showing scale of lung capacity of students in each 
class at first and second examinations. 









Numb 


er of 


Students. 










Test 




October 






April 








above 


1908 


1910 


1911 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 




220 C. 


c. 2 


3 


4 


6 


4 


5 


5 


11 




210 ' 


5 


4 


3 


7 


2 


8 


6 


9 




200 ' 


8 


11 


5 


13 


8 


5 


12 


9 




190 ' 


6 


6 


15 


10 


8 


9 


9 


6 


Average 


180 « 


11 


8 


15 


14 


13 


11 


13 


12 




170 ' 


18 


15 


9 


11 


18 


17 


10 


18 




160 ' 


10 


8 


9 


8 


11 


10 


6 


9 




150 ' 


10 


6 


9 


6 


7 


4 


7 


4 




140 « 


9 


4 


6 


6 


5 





5 


2 




130 ' 


1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


2 


1 


1 




120 ' 


1 





1 


2 


3 





1 











October 






April 






Above 




21 


24 


27 


36 


22 


27 


32 


35 


Average 




11 


8 


15 


14 


13 


11 


13 


12 


Below 




49 


35 


35 


35 


47 


33 


30 


34 



77 

The three highest and lowest tests in strength and lung 
capacity in October and April were : 

Strength. 
October. 
Highest Lowest 

1909 501 kg. 1911 164 kg. 

1908 486 kg. 1911 160.5 kg. 

1909 448 kg. 1911 177 kg. 

April. 
Highest Lowest 

1908 485.5 kg. 1911 155 kg. 

1910 447 kg. 1911 161 kg. 

1909 434 kg. 1908 167 kg. 

Lung Capacity. 

October. 
Highest Lowest 

1911 276 c.c. 1908 .124 c.c. 

1909 252 c.c. 1910 122 c.c. 

1910 246 c.c. 1911 120 c.c. 

April. 
Highest Lowest 

1911 280 c.c. 1910 122 c.c. 

1909 250 c.c. 1908 120 c.c. 

1911 . 250 c.c. 1908 120 c.c. 

Table showing number of physical defects noted at ex- 
amination for treatment during the year. 

Condition N, cS£° f Treatment 

Spinal curvatures 39 32 cases given specially 

prescribed exercises. 

Weak chests 8 Special exercises given. 

Low shoulders 7 Special exercises given. 

General weakness or 

faulty posture .... 9 Special exercises given. 

Mat foot or breaking 

arch 17 11 sent to physicians, 6 

already under treatment. 
Pronation of feet 43 Extreme cases given spe- 
cial exercises. 

Varicose veins 2 None. 

Enlarged thyroid 2 None. 



78 

150 students were examined by Dr. Everitt as to condi- 
tion of heart and lungs, with the following results : 

76 normal, authorised all forms of exercise. 

29 normal, but general health required the more vigor- 
ous forms of athletics to be prohibited or allowed only under 
strict supervision. 

18 had heart murmurs, of these : 

1 allowed all forms of exercise, 10 moderate athletics 
with supervision, 7 moderate exercise only. The condition 
of six had improved since the previous examination, eight 
remained in the same condition, four received only one 
examination. 

6 cases of rapid heart action. All allowed moderate 
athletics with supervision. 

21 slight irregularity in the accentuation of heart 
sounds. 9 allowed all athletics, 10 allowed moderate athletics, 
2 allowed moderate exercise only. 

Oculist's Examination. (General report, detailed report 
sent to the office of the Dean of the College, general report 
only sent to Physical Director.) 

88 students examined. 

43 both eyes normal. 

13 both eyes defective. 

4 right eye defective, left eye normal. 

5 left eye defective, right eye normal. 
5 both eyes almost normal. 

4 right eye almost normal, left eye normal. 
2 left eye almost normal, right eye normal. 

14 abnormal. 

217 students out of a total number of 344 had no ill- 
nesses and required no excuses from exercise. 

Table of Accidents. 

1 . . . . Broken ankle Walking. 

2 . . . . Dislocated knee 1 hockey, 1 vaulting in 

gymnasium. 

4 . . . . Strained ankles 2 athletics, 1 jumping in 

gymnasium, 1 walking. 



79 

N S tud b ents 0f AccideDt ( Cause 

1 . . . . Grazed knee ... - Basket-ball. 

1 . . . . Strained back Hockey. 

1 . . . .Blow on eye Carriage accident. 

2 . . . . Broken noses Hockey. 



SUMMARY. 

Athletics 7 

Gymnastics 2 

Other causes 3 



Gymnasium Report. 

Trial drills of Freshmen and drills for students not sub- 
stituting athletics began the second week of November and 
were held daily. The regular classes began December 2nd, 
the weekly schedule including four fencing classes, five classic 
dancing classes, six light gymnastic classes, five heavy gym- 
nastic classes. 

120 students took fencing, 163 took classic dancing. 

All the Sophomores and Freshmen were required to take 
one light and one heavy gymnastic class a week and in addi- 
tion might take dancing or fencing. Freshmen not able to 
swim were required to take six swimming lessons during the 
gymnastic season. 

A class in classic dancing was held weekly for the mem- 
bers of the graduate school ; there was an average attendance 
of fourteen. 

Fines. 

Five students failed to register the required number of 
gymnasium drills, 3 students failed to have their physical 
appointment during the specified time, 10 students failed to 
register the required number of periods of exercise by the 
Saturday before Finals, 2 students were given a special 
excuse from their fines for unregistered drills. 



so 

The amount received from fines was as follows: 

1 student 4 drills $8.00 

-2 students 1 drill each 4.00 

3 students Physical appointment 6.00 

4 students 1 period of exercise 4.00 

1 student 2 periods of exercise 2.00 

2 students 3 periods of exercise 6.00 

2 students o 1 /^ periods of exercise .... 7.00 

1 student 4 periods of exercise 4.00 

$41.00 

The following numbers of students were excused on the 
recommendation of the College Physician or of their home 
physician endorsed by the College Physician: 



Number of 
Students 



Excused from Gymnasium. 

Time Cause 

3 All year Pelvic disorder. 

2 All year Phlebitis. 

1 All year Cystitis. 

1 All year . Broken arches of feet. 

1 All year Convalescent from typhoid. 

2 All year Nervous exhaustion. 

1 All year Open air exercise preferred. 

1 One semester .... Operation for appendicitis. 

1 One semester .... Broken ankle. 

1 One semester .... Grippe. 

1 One semester .... Excessive menstruation. 

2 One semester .... Warts on feet. 

1 One semester .... Nervous exhaustion. 

Sophomores excused from heavy gymnastics and substi- 
tuting two periods of light gymnastics : 

Number Time Cause 

3 All year Broken arches. 

3 All year Heart murmur. 

3 All year Pelvic disorder. 

3 All year General debility. 

1 All year Sprained wrist. 



81 

On March 27th a demonstration in fencing and classic 
dancing was given by the Seniors and Juniors, and a contest 
was held between the Sophomores and Freshmen in marching 
tactics, wands and dumb-bells, Indian clubs and Swedish 
floor work, also apparatus work on the parallel bars, horse, 
and rope climbing. Dr. Tait McKenzie, of the University of 
Pennsylvania ; Miss Adams, of the Friends' Select School, 
and Miss Cherry, of the Drexel Institute, acted as judges. 
The shield, which is awarded to the class gaining the highest 
number of points, was won by the Sophomores. The points 
were as follows : 

Events Number Points 

Competing 1910 1911 

Marching tactics 72 8 5 

Wands and dumb-bells 48 8 7 

Swedish floor work 48 6 3 

Indian clubs 32 7 9 

Apparatus — Ropes .16 7 7 

Horse 20 7 7 

Parallel bars 20 6 7 

Total 49 45 

Athletics. 

Calendar of Athletics for the Year 1907-08. 

October 2nd — Hockey practice began. 
October 15th — Tennis tournament began. 
November 11th — Hockey matches began. 
December 2nd — Water polo practice began. 
December 11th — Fencing Club practice began. 
January 10th — Swimming contest. Preliminaries. 
January 17th— Swimming contest. Finals. 
February 10th — Track practice began. 
March 5th — Track meet. Preliminaries. 
March 12th — Track meet. Finals. 
March 27th — Fencing tournament. 
March 30th — Basket-ball practice began. 
May 4th — Basket-ball matches began. 
June 3rd — Basket-ball match vs. Alumnae. 



82 

The Athletic Association paid $300 for draining and 
surfacing the lower athletic field, and also paid off a debt of 
$600 owed to President Thomas for money advanced for 
new fields. 

A subscription was raised of $21,000 towards rebuilding 
the gymnasium. 

Athletic Fields. — The lower field with cinder surface 
was very successfully used as a second hockey field during 
the autumn and in the spring was turned into four dirt tennis 
courts, thereby giving the Association eight good courts. 
Next year four more will be laid out on the lower field. The 
upper field was used for hockey and basket-ball and was in 
good condition. 

Athletics Statistics. 

Table showing percentage of resident students taking 
part in athletics. 

Basket Hockey Author. Water Tennis Track 
Ball Swim. Polo 

Class 1908 47 61 49 11 91 16 

1909 44 63 44 17 91 17 

1910 51 72 46 18 95 20 

1911 51 80 49 20 96 34 

College 48 69 47 17 93 22 

Percentage of resident students taking no part in 
athletics. 

Class 1908 •. 5 

1909 7 

1910 

1911 

College 3 

Tennis. — The Class Championship was won by 1908. 
The College Championship was won by 1909. The captains 
were: H. Schmidt, 1908; M. Belleville, 1909; C. Simonds, 
1910; M. Kilner, 1911. 

Hockey. — The Class Championship was won by 1908. 
The captains were: L. Sharpless, 1908; M. bearing, 1909; 



83 

M. Kirk, 1910; H. Emerson, 1.9 ll^ Each class had one first 
and one second team, with substitutes. First and second 
interclass matches were played. Erom 100 to 110 students 
practised daily through the season. In the Bryn Mawr games 
with outside teams Bryn Mawr won three games, tied one, 
lost none. Bryn Mawr scored twenty-two goals during the 
season and was scored on eight goals. 

The Eencing Club was unorganised, but met for prac- 
tice once a week. A tournament was held this year for the 
first time. Eight fencers entered the tournament, which was 
won by G. Biddle, 1909. 

Swimming. — The Class Championship was won by 1909. 
The captains were: N. Seeds, 1908; G. Biddle, 1909; I. 
Taber, 1910; J. Allen, 1911. The events at the contest were 
as follows : 

140 ft. swim on front, 45 s. 

140 ft. swim on back, 48 s. 

Plunge for distance, 37 ft. 2 in. 

Swim under water, 106 ft. 11 in. 

70 ft. swim on front, 20 2-5 s. 

70 ft. swim on back, 23 3-5 s. 

Class relay race. 

Eancy dive. 

Dive for form. 
One record was broken : 

Swim under water. 
One record was made: 

Plunge for distance. 

One hundred and forty-four students were authorised as 
expert swimmers, eighty-four students took swimming les- 
sons, thirty students entered the contest. 

Water Polo. — The Class Championship was won by 
1910. Each class had one first team, with substitutes. 

Track Athletics. — The Class Championship was won by 
1909. The Individual Championship was won by A. Piatt, 
1909. The events were: 
15-yard dash. 
Hurdle race. 



84 

22 ft. rope climb, 12 1-5 s. 
Running high, jump, 4 ft. 3 in. 
Standing high jump, 3 ft. 51/2 in. 
Putting the shot, 30 ft. 9 in. 
Tug-of-war. 

Standing broad jump, 7 ft. 4 in. 
Hop, step, jump, 20 ft. ll 1 /^ in. 
Three broad jumps, 21 ft. 9 in. 
Running vault, 4 ft. 5% iu. 
Ring high jump, 6 ft. 10 in. 
Class relay race. 
College records broken: 
Rope climb, 12 1-5 s. 
Hop, step, jump, 20 ft. ll 1 /^ in. 

The class captains were: J. Griffith, 1908; K. Ecob, 
1909; J. Howell, 1910; M. Hoffman, 1911. Forty-two stu- 
dents entered the meet. 

Bashet-ball. — The Class Championship was won by 1908. 
The captains were: M. Plaisted, 1908; A. Piatt, 1909; G. 
Kingsbacher, 1910 ; J. Allen, 1911. Prom seventy to eighty 
students practised daily. Each class had one first and one 
second team, with substitutes. Eirst and second inter-class 
matches were played. The game played by the Bryn Mawr 
team vs. the Alumnse team was won by Bryn Mawr. The 
score was 6-5. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Constance M. K. Appeebee, 

Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 



85 



Report of the Attending Physician. 

To the President: Madam, 

As a summary of the work done during the college year 
1907-08 I make the following report: 

Cases Treated. 
Medical : 

General colds 20 

Tonsilitis 11 

Moderate influenza 11 

Severe influenza with high temperature 8 

Severe influenza with distinct cardiac symp- 
toms 1 

Pharyngitis 9 

Bronchitis 1 

Bronchiectasis 1 

Laryngitis 1 

Acute indigestion with cardiac syncope 1 

Indigestion 2 

Bash from indigestion 4 

Bilious attacks 2 

Intestinal colic , 2 

Catarrhal appendicitis (1 operative) 2 

Measles 5 

Urticaria 4 

Mumps 2 

Chicken pox 1 

Lichen-planus 1 

Neurasthenia 6 

Rheumatism 1 

Sub-acute rheumatoid pains 1 

Syncope 1 

Metrorrhagia 1 

Ivy poisoning 1 

100 



Surgical : 

Sprain of ankle 13 

Fracture of tibia and fibula 1 

Fracture of metatarsal of right thumb 1 

Contusions 4 

Cervical adenitis 1 

Tendo synovitis 1 

Sprain of flexor tendons 1 

Concussion (very mild) 1 

Torticollis 2 

Hemorrhoids 1 

Vaccination 1 

Inflamed corn on foot 1 

Wart on foot 1 

Granular conjunctivitis 2 

Stye of eye 1 

Dislocated semi-lunar cartilage of knee 1 

Swelling of sub-maxillary gland 1 

Abdominal pains from adhesions 1 

Displacement of nasal septum 1 

Slight laceration of ligamental attachment of 

middle gluteal 1 



37 



137 



It will be noted that we have had three contagious dis- 
eases, measles, mumps, and chicken pox. This does not in- 
clude tonsilitis, which I would now class with the contagious 
troubles. 

The significant point to be made in my report is that on 
two different occasions we had three contagious diseases 
occurring at the same time, and that our accommodation in 
the remodelled and poorly equipped physical laboratory 
which now serves us as an infirmary, makes it impossible to 
isolate more than two types of contagion. I mention this as 
another proof of the crying necessity for reasonable facili- 
ties to care for so large a body of students. 

It is a source of satisfaction that, despite these condi- 



87 

tions, we have been able to prevent .any general spread of the 
diseases, this being peculiarly true in the cases of measles, 
which have been scattered through the year and save in a 
single instance due to infection outside of the college. 

I am particularly solicitous that the health examinations 
in the future shall prevent the admission of a student suffer- 
ing from a chronic condition, as has been the case in the 
student suffering from bronchiectasis, who has been in the 
college during the three years of my service. Though feeling 
the deepest sympathy with this student in her earnest desire 
for the benefits of a higher education, I cannot feel it wise 
to make her one of the student body and thus impose upon 
the other students a cause of apprehension and perhaps 
danger. 

The nurses employed during the past year have been 
very satisfactory, and have aided greatly in the preservation 
of the best degree of health among the students. 

The case of operative appendicitis mentioned in the 
medical report was a student who suffered from an attack of 
catarrhal appendicitis. She made a complete recovery from 
the acute attack, returned to her home in Chicago, and was 
operated upon with the advice of her uncle and physician, 
Dr. H. B. Favill, who accepted the diagnosis, approved the 
treatment, and believed that safety for the future indicated 
removal of the source of trouble. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Branson, 

Attending Physician. 



88 



Report of the Visiting Physician of the College. 

To the President : Madam,, 

I have the honor to submit the following report for the 
year 1907-08 : 

I. During the college year, October 2, 1907, to June 
1, 1908, forty-six patients were cared for in the infirmary 
building. The total number of days' care amounted to 367. 
During the greater part of the year contagious cases were in 
isolation, making it necessary to care for other students to 
the number of twenty-six, either in their rooms "or in other 
institutions. The number does not include the cases of minor 
menstrual disturbance. 

The classification of Infirmary Cases is as follows : 

Abrasions of knee 2 

Adenitis 1 

Appendicitis 2 

Conjunctivitis 1 

Contusion 1 

Coryza 3 

Cystitis 1 

Dermatitis 2 

Dermatitis venanata 1 

Dysmenorrhea 2 

Exhaustion, general 2 

Fracture of nose 1 

Influenza 4 

Iritis 1 

Laceration of ligaments (knee) . 1 

Nervous exhaustion 2 

Oclontia 1 

Parotiditis 4 

Rheumatism 2 

Rubeola 5 

Shock, general 1 

Sprain, ankle 1 



89 

Tonsilitis . .'. V 3 

Ulcer 2 

Varicella 1 

Total 47 

II. The report of my personal work in the office and 
dormitories is as follows : 

Physical examinations 280 

Number of students' visits to office 322 

Number of visits to students confined to their rooms ... 17 

Vaccinations 81 

Total number of consultations 700 

III. Tabulation of conditions treated. 
Medical and Surgical : 

Acne 1 

Adenitis 3 

Adenoma (mammary) 1 

Allopecia 1 

An semi a 2 

Angioneurotic oedema 1 

Appendiceal colic 1 

Bronchitis 6 

Cardiac strain 2 

Conjunctivitis 1 

Contusions 3 

Coryza 13 

Dermatitis 1 

Epistaxis 1 

Erythema 1 

Elat foot 4 

Indigestion, gastric 3 

Indigestion, intestinal 2 

Influenza 2 

Insomnia 2 

Iritis " 1 



90 

Jaundice (catarrhal) 1 

Laryngitis 9 

Nervous exhaustion 13 

Pharyngitis 5 

Psoriasis 1 

Rheumatism (muscular) 2 

Sprain 3 

Strain (muscular) 8 

Synovitis 1 

Tonsilitis 2 

Tracheitis 3 

Ulcer 1 

Warts 2 

Gynaecological : 

Displacement of the uterus 2 

Menstrual Disorders : 

Amenorrhoea 6 

Dysmenorrhea 2 

Menorrhagia 4 

Ovarian cyst 1 

IV. Tabulation of students by classes (exclusive of 
physical examinations and vaccinations) : 

Graduates 22 

Seniors 17 

Juniors 14 

Sophomores 30 

Preshmen 27 

Total 110 

V. The total number of visits paid by nurses to stu- 
dents in the various halls, and by students to the infirmary 
for surgical dressings, etc., was 1,159. This represents an 
amount of work which has been greatly increased by the lack 
of proper infirmary accommodations. The work of the nurses 
has been efficiently and cheerfully performed, notwithstand- 



91 

ing the many difficulties and handicaps under which they 
labor. 

No other need of the institution can be more urgent than 
that of a new infirmary. The defects and inadequacies of the 
present building do not bear enumeration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ella B. Everitt, 
Visiting Physician. 



Appendices. 



I. 

Promotions, Reappointments, and Changes in the Academic 
and Administrative Staff for the Year 1908-09. 

James H. Leuba, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Education and 
Director of the Psychological Laboratory, returned after one 
year's leave of absence. 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, A.B., promoted to be Associate Professor of 
English and granted leave of absence for one year. 

Kael Detlev Jessen, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Professor of 
German Literature. 

Tenney Frank, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Professor of 
Latin. 

Nettie Maria Stevens, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Morphology, 
granted leave of absence for one year. 

Caroline Louise Ransom, Ph.D., Associate in the History of Art and 
Classical Archaeology, granted leave of absence for the second 
semester of 1908-09. 

Richard Thayer Holbroob:, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Pro- 
fessor of French Philology and Italian. 

Robert Matteson Johnston, M.A., Associate Professor of History, 
resigned to accept the Assistant Professorship in Modern History 
at Harvard University. 

Charles Clarence Williamson, Ph.D., Associate in Economics and 
Politics, returned after absence for one semester on account of 
illness. 

Daniel Webster Ohern, Ph.D., Associate in Geology, resigned to 
accept the Professorship of Geology in the University of Okla- 
homa. 

Marion Parris, A.B., promoted to be Associate in Economics and 
Politics. 

(92) 



93 

William Henry Allison, Ph.D., appointed Associate in History. 
Dr. Allison received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Harvard 
University in 1893, and the degree of Bachelor in Divinity from 
Newton Theological Institution in 1902 : he held a Fellowship 
in Church History in the University of Chicago from 1902 to 

1904 and received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy of the 
University of Chicago in 1905. He was Professor of Church 
History in Pacific Theological Seminary, from 1904 to 1905 ; Pro- 
fessor of History and Political Science in Franklin College, from 

1905 to 1908, and Research Assistant of the Carnegie Institu- 
tion, from 1906 to 1908. 

Clarence D. Ashley, LL.M., LL.D., J.D., Non-resident Lecturer in 
Law, reappointed. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., Non-resident Lecturer in English Dic- 
tion, reappointed. 

Orie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., resigned the Readership in English 
and appointed Lecturer in Elizabethan Literature. 

Leila Clement Spaulding, A.M., appointed Lecturer in Art and 
Archaeology and to act as substitute for Dr. Ransom during her 
absence in the second semester. Miss Spaulding received the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts from Vassar College in 1899 and the 
degree of Master of Arts from Columbia University in 1901. She 
held the Curtis Scholarship at Columbia University from 1900 
to 1901, was a graduate Student at Columbia University from 
1901 to 1902 ; held the Agnes Hoppin Memorial Fellowship at 
the American School of Classical Studies in Athens from 1902 to 
1903 ; was Instructor in Greek and Greek Archaeology at Vassar 
College from 1903 to 1907, and holder of the Lydia Pratt Babbott 
Fellowship of Vassar College and Graduate Student, Columbia 
University, 1907 to 1908. 

M. Katherine Jackson, Ph.D., appointed Lecturer in English Litera- 
ture during Miss Donnelly's year of absence. Dr. Jackson 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Ohio Wesleyan 
University in 1898 and the degree of Master of Arts in 1900. 
She was Instructor in English at Belhaven College, Jackson, 
Mississippi, from 1900 to 1902; Graduate Student at Columbia 
University from 1902 to 1905 and received the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy from Columbia University in 1906. She was 
Instructor in English Literature at Mount Holyoke College from 
1905 to 1908, and Graduate Student in Tale University from 
1907 to 1908. 



94 

Chester Albert Reeds, M.S., appointed Lecturer in Geology. Mr. 
Reeds received the degree of Bachelor of Science from the Uni- 
versity of Oklahoma in 1905, and the degree of Master of Science 
from Tale University in 1907. He held a Graduate Scholarship in 
Yale University from 1905 to 1906 and a Fellowship from 1906 
to 1908. He was a field assistant for the U. S. Geological 
Survey from 1903 to 1906 ; a special field assistant to Professor 
Charles Schuchert in the summer of 1907, and Instructor in 
Mineralogy and Petrology in the University of Oklahoma from 
February to June, 1908. 

Rose Chamberlin, M.A., Reader in German, reappointed. 

Harriet Randolph, Ph.D., Reader in Botany and Demonstrator in 
Biology, reappointed. 

Katharine Fullerton, A.M., Reader in English, granted leave of 
absence for one year. 

Regina Katharine Crandall, Ph.D., Reader in English, reappointed. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., Reader in English, reappointed. 

Abby Kirk, A.B., Reader in Elementary Greek, reappointed. 

Helen Ward, A.B., Reader in English, reappointed. 

Bertha Marian Pillsbury, A.M., Reader in English, term expired. 

Grace Maxwell Fernald, Ph.D., Reader in Education and Demon- 
strator in Psychology, term expired. 

Maud Downing, A.B., Reader in Semitic Languages, reappointed. 

Grace Mead Andrus de Laguna, Ph.D., Reader in Philosophy, term 
expired. 

Clara Leonora Nicolay, Ph.D., Reader in Elementary French, re- 
appointed. 

Bertha Cornelia Norris, A.B., Reader in Latin, term expired. 

Lily Ross Taylor, A.B., appointed Reader in Latin. Miss Taylor 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the University of 
Wisconsin in 1906, and held a Graduate Scholarship in Latin 
in Bryn Mawr College from 1906 to 1907, and the Resident 
Fellowship in Latin from 1907 to 1908. 

Virginia Ragsdale, Ph.D., appointed Reader in Mathematics. Dr. 
Ragsdale received the degree of B.S. from Guilford College 
in 1892, the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr College 
in 1896, and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1906. She 
held a Graduate Scholarship in Mathematics at Bryn Mawr 
College from 1892 to 1893 ; she held the Bryn Mawr European 
Fellowship and was Assistant Demonstrator in Physics in Bryn 



95 

Mawr College from 1896 to 1897 ; from 1897 to 1898 she studied 
at the University of Gottingen; frb"ru 1901 to 1902 sue held the 
Fellowship of the Baltimore Association for the Promotion of 
the University Education of Women and was a Graduate Scholar 
and Fellow by Courtesy in Mathematics at Bryn Mawr College; 
from 1902 to 1903 she was Fellow in Mathematics at Bryn 
Mawr College. She taught Mathematics in the Bryn Mawr 
School, Baltimore, from 1898 to 1901, in Dr. J. Sachs's School 
for Girls, New York City, from 1903 to 1905, and in the Baldwin 
School, Bryn Mawr, from 1906 to 1909. 

Lillie Deming Loshe, Ph.D., appointed Reader in English during 
Miss Fullerton's year of absence. Dr. Loshe received the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr College in 1899, the degree of 
Master of Arts from Columbia University in 1903 and the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy from Columbia University in 1908. 
She was a Graduate Student at Barnard College from 1899 to 
1900 and at Columbia University from 1901 to 1904, in the first 
semester of 1904 to 1905 and from 1905 to 1907. 

Asa Russell Gifford, A.M., appointed Reader in Philosophy. Mr. 
Gifford received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Wesleyan 
University in 1904, and the degree of Master of Arts from Yale 
University in 1907. He was a Graduate Student in Yale Univer- 
sity from 1906 to 1908, and Assistant in Philosophy in Yale 
University from 1907 to 1908. 

Frances Lowater, Ph.D., reappointed Demonstrator in Physics. 

Gertrude Langden Heritage, A.M., reappointed Demonstrator in 
Chemistry. 

Una McMahon, A.B., reappointed Demonstrator in the History of 
Art and Classical Archaeology. 

Anna Bell Lawther, A.B., reappointed Secretary of the College. 

Ethel McCoy Walker, A.B., reappointed Recording Secretary and 
Appointment Secretary. 

Isadore Gilbert Mudge, Ph.B., B.L.S., Librarian of the College, 
resigned. 

Mary Letitia Jones, A.B., B.L.S., Acting Librarian, promoted to be 
Librarian. 

Edna Lucy Goss, B.L.S., Head Cataloguer, resigned. 

Mary Ellen Baker, A.B., B.L.S., appointed Head Cataloguer. Miss 
Baker received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Lincoln 
University in 1900, and the degree of B.L.S. from the New 
York State Library School in 1908. She was Assistant in Latin 



96 

in Missouri Valley College from 1901 to 1905, and Librarian 
from 1902 to 1906. She studied at the Illinois State Library 
School from 1906 to 1907 and at the New York State Library 
School from 1907 to 1908. 

Marian Cinderella Bell, A.B., B.L.S., Assistant Cataloguer, resigned. 

Bessie Homes Jennings, promoted to be Assistant Cataloguer. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, Director of Athletics and Gymnastics, 
reappointed. 

Emma Isabella Sisson, Assistant Director of Athletics and Gym- 
nastics, resigned. 

Elizabeth L. Gray, appointed Assistant Director of Athletics and 
Gymnastics. 

Maby Warren Taylor, Keeper of Gymnastic Records, reappointed. 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D., Attending Physician of the College, re- 
appointed. 

Ella B. Everitt, M.D., Visiting Physician of the College, reappointed. 

Anne Heath Thomas, M.D., appointed Assistant Visiting Physician 
of the College. Dr. Thomas received the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts from Bryn Mawr College in 1897, the degree of Master of 
Arts in 1898 and the degree of Doctor of Medicine from the 
Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1905. She was 
Graduate Scholar in Physics and Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 
from 1897 to 1898; Teacher of Chemistry in the State Normal 
School, Trenton, N. J., from 1898 to 1902. Interne, Woman's 
Hospital of Philadelphia, from 1905 to 1906 ; Resident at the 
Evening Dispensary for Working Women and Girls, Baltimore, 
Md., and Graduate Student in Medicine, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, from 1906 to 1907 ; Physician, Registrar, and Assistant in 
Clinic in the Woman's Hospital of Philadelphia, and Assistant 
in Clinic in the Hospital of the Woman's Medical College of 
Pennsylvania, from 1907 to 1908. 

Helen Murphy, M.D., Examining Oculist, reappointed. 

Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Warden and Assistant Adviser to 
the Freshmen of Pembroke Hall, reappointed. 

Alice Anthony, A.B., Warden and Assistant Adviser to the Fresh- 
men of Denbigh Hall, reappointed. 

Virginia Tryon Stoddard, A.B., Warden and Assistant Adviser to 
the Freshmen of Radnor Hall, reappointed. 

Elizabeth Farris Stoddard, A.B., Warden and Assistant Adviser to 
the Freshmen of Merion Hall, resigned. 



97 

Harriet Jean Crawford, A.B., Warden and Assistant Adviser to the 
Freshmen of Rockefeller Hall, reappointed. 

Friedrika Margrethe Heyl, A.B., appointed Warden and Assistant 
Adviser to the Freshmen of Merion Hall. Miss Heyl received the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn, Mawr College in 1899. 
She was Teacher of German and Student in the State Normal 
School, Fredonia, N. Y., from 1899 to 1900, Teacher in the Balliol 
School, Utica, N. Y., from 1900 to 1901 and Secretary from 1901 
to 1908. 

Bertha Margaret Laws, A.B., Assistant to the Warden of Pembroke 
Hall, reappointed. 

James G. Forrester, M.A., Comptroller, reappointed. 

Esther Hoy Taylor, First Assistant in Comptroller's Office, resigned. 

Ruth Hilma Cook, appointed First Assistant in Comptroller's 
Office. Miss Cook received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from 
Mt. Holyoke College in 1905, and was Reader in History and 
Assistant to the Treasurer of Mt. Holyoke College from 1905 
to 1906. 

Alexander H. Campell, Business Manager, term expired. 

Joseph A. Skelley, appointed Business Manager. Mr. Skelley has 
been for the past five years Superintendent for Messrs. John 
Sarre & Co., Contractors and Builders, and also Superintendent 
for Mr. James Wall Fin, Interior Decorator, New York City. 

Kate C. Swinburne, Junior Bursar, resigned after a period of three 
and a half months. 

Bessie Livingstone, former Junior Bursar of the College, reappointed 

for the remainder of the year, resigned. 
Anna Delany Fry, A.B., appointed Junior Bursar. Miss Fry 

received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr College 

in 1899. 



IL 

Fellowships and Scholarships Conferred for the Year 
1908-09. 

Lewis, Mayone, Bryn Mawr European Fellow. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Holder of Trustees' Phila- 
delphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1904-08 ; Holder of the James 
E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 1905-06 ; Holder of the Maria L. Eastman 
Brooke Hall Memorial Scholarship, 1907-08. 

Coulter, Cornelia Catlin, President's European Fellow. 

Ferguson, Mo. A.B., Washington University, 1907. Graduate Scholar in 
Latin, 1907-08. 

Nichols, Helen Hawley, Mary E. Garrett European Fellow. 

Marietta, O. A.B., Marietta College, 1906. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1906-07 ; Graduate Scholar in Semitic Languages, 1907-08. 

Weusthofp, Anna Sophie, 

Ottenclorfer Memorial Research Fellow in Teutonic Philology. 

New York City. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1906. Graduate 
Scholar in Teutonic Philology, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Special Otten- 
dorfer Memorial Research Fellow and Student, University of Berlin, 1907-08. 

Burnley, Mary Cloyd, Research Fellow in Chemistry. 

Swarthmore, Pa. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1897, and A.M., 1899. 
Fellow in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1897-98 ; Assistant in Chemistry, 
Vassar College, 1898-1900, and Instructor in Chemistry, 1900-08. 

Swindler, Mary Hamilton, Fellow in Greek. 

Bloomington, Ind. A.B., University of Indiana, 1905, and A.M., 1906. Grad- 
uate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Fellow in Greek, 
1907-08. 

Aven, Anna Ward, Fellow in Latin. 

Clinton, Miss. A.B., Mississippi College, 1905 ; Graduate Student in Greek 
and Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Graduate Scholar in Latin, 
1907-08. 

Sandison, Helen Estabrook Fellow in English. 

Terre Haute, Ind. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1906, and A.M., 1907. Gradu- 
ate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. Assistant Principal of the High 
School, Brookville, Ind., 1907-08. 

Harmon, Esther, Fellow in German and Teutonic Philology. 

Toledo, O. A.B., University of Michigan, 1906. Graduate Scholar in Teu- 
tonic Philology, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. Holder of the President's 
European Fellowship and Student, University of Berlin, 1907-08. 

Mlllman, Maeel Helen, Fellow in French. 

Toronto, Canada. A.B., University of Toronto, 1907. Graduate Student, 

University of Toronto, June, 1907, to January, 1908 ; Teacher of History 

in the Westbourne School, Toronto, January to June, 1908, and of Latin 
in Havergal College, Toronto, April to June, 1908. 

Cam, Helen Maud, Fellow in History. 

Bishops Stortford, England. B.A., University of London, 1908. Royal 
Holloway College, 1904-07. 

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99 

Chamberlain, Ethel Mary, . . . .- Fellow in Philosophy. 

Galesburg, 111. A.B., Lombard College, 1906. Graduate Student, University 
of Chicago, 1906-08. 

Smith, Eva Maria, Fellow in Mathematics. 

London, England. Newnham College, University of Cambridge, England, 
1904-08. Graduate in Honours, First Class in the Cambridge Mathematical 
Tripos, Part I, 1907, and Part II, 1908. 

Lamberton, Helen Fellow in Physics. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907, and A.M., 1908, Graduate 
Scholar in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Reynolds, Grace Potter, . . . Felloio in Chemistry. 

Stamford, Conn. A.B., Smith College, 1904. A.M., Columbia University, 
1905. Graduate Student, Columbia University, 1904-05 ; Assistant in 
Chemistry, Barnard College, 1906-08. 

Reed, Margaret Adaline, Felloio in Biology. 

Meyersdale, Pa. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1901. Graduate 
Student in Biology. Bryn Mawr College, 1901-03, ard Graduate Scholar, 
1902-03. Wood's Holl Laboratory. Summers of 1900 and 1902 ; Assistant 
in Zoological Laboratory, Columbia University, 1903-05 ; University of 
Zurich, Summer, 1906 ; Assistant in Zoology, Columbia University, 1903-06 ; 
Lecturer in Physiology, New York Medical College for Women, and Barnard 
College, 1904-07 ; Student in Berlin, Summer, 1908. 

Bowerman, Helen Cox, Graduate Scholar in Archaeology. 

Point Pleasant, N. J. A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1901 ; A.M., University of 
Rochester, 1903. Teacher of English and Latin in the High School, Macedon, 
N. Y., 1903-05 ; Instructor in Latin, Western College for Women, Oxford, 
O., 1905-07, and Associate Professor of Latin, 1907-08. 

Crawford, Emily C, Graduate Scholar in Greek. 

Montreal, Canada. A.B., McGill University, 1907. Graduate Scholar in 
Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Foster, Elizabeth Andros, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Sharon, Mass. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. 

Matsuda, Michi, Graduate Scholar in Economics and Politics. 

Mineyama, Tango, Japan. A.B., Bryn Mawr College. 1S99. Teacher in Kobe 
College, Kobe, Japan, 1899-1904, and in The Doshisha, Kyoto, Japan, 
1904-08. 

Morgan, Louise Baggott, Graduate Scholar in English. 

Providence, R. I. A.B. and A.M., Brown University, 1907. Graduate Scholar 
in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Mustha, Mary Washburn, Graduate Scholar in Biology. 

New York City. A.B., Barnard College, 1908. 

Peebles, Rose Jeffries, 

Graduate Scholar and Fellow oy Courtesy in English. 

Birmingham, Ala. A.B., Mississippi State College for Women, 1891. Uni- 
versity of Chicago, Summer, 1897, 1898, 1905 ; Harvard University, Sum- 
mer, 1902 ; Columbia University, Summer, 1903 ; Graduate Student in 
English, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Fellow in English, 1907-08. 

Philputt, Grace Maxwell, Graduate Scholar in Spanish. 

Indianapolis, Ind. A.B., Indiana State University, 1908. 

Rambo, Eleanor Ferguson, .... Graduate Scholar in Greek. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. City Scholar, 1904-08. 

Rand, Marie Gertrude Graduate Scholar in Psychology. 

Brooklyn, New York City. A.B., Cornell University, 1908. 



100 

Rendel, Frances Elinor, Graduate Scholar in Economics and Politics. 
London, England. Newnham College, University of Cambridge, England, 
Cambridge Historical Tripos, Part I, 1906; Part II, 1907. 

Richards, Annabella Elliott, Graduate Scholar in Chemistry. 

Merion, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. 

Rodi, Irma Graduate Scholar in Philosophy. 

Calumet, Mich. A.B., University of Michigan, 1908. 

Sanderson, Ruth Elizabeth, Graduate Scholar in Archaeology. 

Moosup, Conn. A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1905. Assistant in Latin and Greek, 
Black River Academy, 1905-08. 

Smith, Clara Lyford. — Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Los Angeles, Cal. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907, and A.M., 1908. Gradu- 
ate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Spalding, Mary Caroline Graduate Scholar in English. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. A.B., Vassar College, 1901. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1906-08. 

Wieand, Helen Emma, Graduate Scholar in Archaeology. 

Pottstown, Pa. A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1906. Graduate Scholar in Latin 
and Archaeology, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Greene, Inez Abigail, Graduate Foundation Scholar. 

Whittier, Cal. A.B., Whittier College, 1904. Assistant Principal of Juvenile 
Department, The Public Library, Los Angeles, Cal., 1904-08. 

Saint, Pauline Earlham Graduate Scholar. 

New Castle, Ind. A.B., Earlham College, 1908. 

White, Alice Everett, • Guilford Graduate Scholar. 

High Point, N. C. A.B., Guilford College, 1908. 

Bruff, Anna Marie, Penn Graduate Scholar. 

Atlantic, la. A.B., Penn College, 190S. 

Child, Dorothy Martin, Foundation Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of Foundation Scholarship, 1905-08. 

Parker, Alpine Bodine, Foundation Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
Foundation Scholarship, 1907-08. 

Hartshorne, Anna, ■ Foundation Scholar. 

Brighton, Md. Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. 

Shipley, Mary Boyd, Foundation Scholar. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Holder of Foundation Scholarship, 1906-08. 

Harlan, Elizabeth, First Neiv England States Matriculation Scholar. 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 

Chamberlain, Gladys Elizabeth, 

Second New England States Matriculation Scholar. 

Portland, Me. Prepared by the Waynefleet School, Portland, Me. 

Bontecou, Eleanor, 

First New York and New Jersey Matriculation Scholar. 

South Orange, N. J. Prepared by Miss Beard's School, Orange. 

Brown, Marion Hastings, 

Second New YorJc and New Jersey Matriculation Scholar. 

St. Paul, Minn. Prepared lay the Balliol School, Utica, N. Y. 



101 

Colter, Helen Margaret, 

First Western 'States Matriculation Scholar. 
Cincinnati, O. Prepared by the Bartholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati. 
Stirling, Jean Wedderburn, 

Second Western States Matriculation Scholar. 
Chicago, 111. Prepared by the University School for Girls, Chicago. 
Taet, Helen Herron, 

First Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar. 
Cincinnati, O. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Barlow, Aileen Hardwick, 

Second Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar. 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Beliekowsky, Sadie, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 
Helen Muller Bley, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of the First (equal') Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsyl- 
vania and the Southern States, 1906-07, and of Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholarship, 1906-08. 

Darkow, Angela, Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of the First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and 
the Southern States, 1907-08. Holder of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High 
School Scholarship, 1907-08, and of Maria Hopper Scholarship, 1908-09. 

Ehlers, Bertha Sophie, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of the First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and 
the Southern States, 1905-06 ; Holder of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High 
School Scholarship, 1905-08. 

Heffern, Anna, ..Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Irwin, Agnes Miller, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of Trustees Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1906-08. 

Nearing, Mary Frances, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of the Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and 
the Southern States, 1905-06 ; Holder of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High 
School Scholarship, 1905-08. 

Pottberg, Ellen Esther, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1907-08. 

Justice, Caroline Letchworth, 

Trustees' Lower Merlon High School Scholar. 

Narberth, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa. 
Holder of Trustees' Lower Merion High School Scholarship, 1907-08. 



102 

Liddell, Katharine Forbes, James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar. 

New York City. Prepared by the Calhoun-Chamberlain School, Montgomery, 
Ala. 

Crane, Marion Delia, James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar. 

Boston, Mass. Prepared by the High School, Abington, Mass., and by pri- 
• vate tuition. 

Ladd, Mary Ethel, Mary E. Stevens Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-08. 

Darkow, Angela, Maria Hopper Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of First Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the Southern 
States, 1907-08, and of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar- 
ship, 1907-08. 

Murray, Agnes Laurence, Maria Hopper Scholar. 

Delhi, N. Y. Prepared by St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y. 

Bontecou, Margaret, Brooke Hall Memorial Scholar. 

South Orange, N. J. Prepared by Miss Beard's School, Orange. 

Dillin, Margaret Sidner, Brooke Hall Memorial Scholar. 

Radnor, Pa. Prepared by the High School, Radnor. 

Gilroy, Jessie Jay, L. C. B. Saul Memorial Scholar. 

Aldan, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of the L. C. B. Saul Memorial Scholarship, 1905-08. 

Gilroy, Helen Turnbull, Anna M. 'Powers Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the High School, East Orange, N. J., and by Miss 
Keyser's School, Philadelphia. 

Boyer, Judith McCutcheon, Elisabeth Duane Gillespie Scholar. 

Pottsville, Pa. Prepared by the High School, Pottsville, and by Miss Wright's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mtltenberger, Eugenia Blow, . .Elisabeth Duane Gillespie Scholar. 

Ferguson, Mo. Prepared by Mary Institute, St. Louis, Mo. 

Mitchell, Pearl Boring, Minnie Murdoch KendricJc Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Arthurs, Ann Catherine, Bryn Mawr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Lewis, Rebecca Renshaw Bryn Mawr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Preston, Margaret Junkin, Bryn Mawr ScJwol Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Wooldridge, Grace La Pierre, Bryn Mawr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1905-OS. 

Adair, Edith, City Scholar. 

Germantown, Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadel- 
phia. Holder of the James B. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship and of City 
Scholarship, 1906-08. 

Caskey, Emily Edna, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1907-08. 

Chickering, Julia, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1907-08. 



103 

Clifton, Anna Eleanor, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1905-08. 

Clifton, Jessie Williams, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1907-08. 

Forstee, Emma, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1907-0S. 

Goodwin, Mary Merrick, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1905-08. 

Hudson, Margaret Elizabeth, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1905-08. 

James, Ltllie, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-08. 

Kirk, Marion Shelmire, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-08 ; Holder of Maria Hopper Scholarship, 1907-08. 

Ladd, Mary Ethel, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-08. 

Nearing, Dorothy City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-08. 

Root, Mary Longacre, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-08. 

Rumrill, Helen DuBois, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1905-08. 

Stecher, Lorle Ida, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Wesner, Mary Boyd, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of City Scholarship, 1906-08. 

Wilson, Genevieve, City Scholar 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of First (equal) Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania 
and the Southern States, 1906-07 ; Holder of City Scholarship, 1906-08. 

Helburn, Thekese, George W. Child's Prize Essayist. 

Boston, Mass. Prepared by Miss Winsor's School, Boston, by Miss Florence 
Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private study. 

Franklin, Margaret, 

Honorably Mentioned for George W. Childs Essay Prize. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the 
Southern States, 1901-02 ; Holder of Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 
1902-03, 1904-08. 

Helburn, Theeese, . . Winner of Mary Helen Ritchie Memorial Prize. 



III. 

Degrees Conferred during the Academic Year 1907-08. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 
4 

Edith Fahnestock, of Ohio. 

L.B., Western Reserve University, 1894. University of Zurich and Sorbonne, 
1894-96 ; Mistress of Modern Languages, Mississippi Industrial Institute and 
College, Columbus, Miss., 1898-1901, 1902-05 ; Fellow in Romance Languages, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1S97-98 ; Graduate Scholar and Fellow by Courtesy in 
Romance Languages, 1901-02, and Graduate Scholar, 1906-07 ; Instructor 
in Romance Languages, Mt. Holyoke College, 1907-08. Subjects : French 
Literature, Old French Philology, and Spanish. Thesis : The Sources and 
Composition of the Old French Lai d'Haveloc. 

Edith Hayward Hall, of Connecticut. 

A.B., Smith College, 1899. Teacher of Greek and History in Woodstock 
Academy, Woodstock, Conn., 1899-1900 ; Teacher of Latin and Greek in the 
Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1900-01, and 1905-08 ; Graduate 
Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1900-01, 1905-08, and Graduate Scholar, 1901- 
03 ; Holder of the Mary B. Garrett European Fellowship, 1903-04, and 
Holder of the Agnes Hoppin Memorial Fellowship and Student at the 
American School of Classical Studies, Athens, 1903-05. Subjects : Archae- 
ology and Greek. Thesis : The Decorative Art of Crete in the Bronze Age. 

Marion Parris, of New York. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901, group, History and Political Science. Private 
Tutor, 1901-02 ; Warden of Summit Grove, Bryn Mawr College, 1902-04, 
and of Rockefeller Hall, 1904-05 : Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1902-05 ; Fellow in Economics, Bryn Mawr College, 1905-06 ; Holder of 
Bryn Mawr College Research Fellowship and Student, University of Vienna, 
1906-07 ; Reader in Economics and Politics, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08. 
Subjects : Economics and Politics and Philosophy. Thesis : Total Utility 
and the Economic Judgment. 

Helen Elizabeth Schaeffer, of Pennsylvania. 

A.B., Dickinson College, 1903. Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1903-04 ; Fellow in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-05 ; Holder 
of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship and Student, University of 
Gottingen, 1905-06 ; Demonstrator in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1906- 
07 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-0S, and Teacher in the 
Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, 1907-0S. Subjects : Physics, Pure Mathe- 
matics, and Applied Mathematics. Thesis : A Study of the Electric Spark 
in a Magnetic Field. 

MASTER OF ARTS. 

5 

Marie Rowland Bunker, of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. 

Helen Lamberton, of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. Scholar in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 
1907-08. 

Edith Florence Rice, of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 
1907-08. 

Clara Lyford Smith, of Missouri. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 
1907-08. 



(104) 



105 

Helen Twining Smith, of Maryland. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. Scholar In lEconomics, Bryn Mawr College, 
1907-08. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 
81 

Elizabeth Dixon Wilson, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Friends' Central School, Philadelphia. Group, History and 
Economics and Politics. The work for this degree was completed in Feb- 
ruary, 1908. 

Melanie Gildersleeve Atherton, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Wilkes Barre Institute. Group, History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Mary Estella Dolores Biedenbach, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Chemistry and 
Geology. 

Mildred Remsen Bishop, of Ohio. 

Prepared by Walnut Hill High School, Cincinnati, and by private tuition. 
Group, Greek and French. 

Adele Brandeis, of Kentucky. 

Prepared by the Semple Collegiate School, Louisville, and by Miss Florence 
Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Kate Hampton Bryan, of South Carolina. 

Prepared by Mrs. I. A. Smith's School, Charleston, and by private tuition. 
Group, History and Philosophy. 

Elsie Harriet Bryant, of Illinois. 

Prepared by the High School, Oak Park. Group, History and German. 

Gertrude Mary Buffum, of Rhode Island. 

Prepared by the Lincoln School, and by the Hope Street High School, Provi- 
dence. Special Student in Greek, Women's College in Brown University, 
1903-04 ; Student in the Rhode Island Normal School, 1904-05 ; Director 
of the League for Social Service, Providence, 1904-05 ; Teacher in Primary 
School, Haverford, Pa., 1905-07. Group, Greek and Latin. 

Lucy Perkins Carner, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the York Collegiate Institute, and by private tuition. Group, 
Latin and English. 

Anna Merven Carrere, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City, and by private tuition. 
Group, History and Economics and Politics. 

Adelaide Teague Case, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. Group, Mathematics and 
Philosophy. 

Edith Chambers, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Friends' Select School, Philadelphia. Group, Latin and 
English. 

Anna Newhall Clark, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, History 
and Economics and Politics. 

Mary Cockrell, of Texas. 

Prepared by the Misses Kirk's School, Rosemont, Pa., and by private tuition. 
Group, History and Economics and Politics. 

Louise Congdon, of Illinois. 

Prepared by the High School, Evanston. Northwestern University, 1903-04. 
Group, Latin and French. 



106 

Margaret Boyd Copeland, of Illinois. 

Prepared by the Girton School, Winnetka, and by private tuition. Group, 
Economics and Politics and Philosophy. 

Elizabeth Long Crawford, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa. Holder of Lower 
' Merion High School Scholarship, 1904-05. Group, Latin and German. 

Dorothy Dalzell, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by the Girls' Latin School, Boston. Group, Greek and Latin. 

Margaret Chloe Doolittle, of Ohio. 

Wellesley College, 18S9-91. Teacher of Mathematics in the Misses Kirk's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1903-08. Group, Latin and Mathematics. 

Margaret Steel Duncan, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Group, German and 
French. 

Anna Mary Dunham, of Chicago. 

Prepared by the Sieboth-Kennedy School, Chicago. Group, French and Italian 
and Spanish. 

Adda Eldredge, of Michigan. 

Prepared by the Northern Michigan Normal School, Marquette, by Miss 
Florence Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. Group, 
Latin and Mathematics. 

Irene Stauffer Eldridge, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia, and by private study. 
Holder of City Scholarship, 1904-07. Group, Latin and English. 

Myra Elliot, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. Group, Latin and French. 

Madeleine Maus Fauvre, of Indiana. 

Prepared by the Girls' Classical School, Indianapolis, and by private tuition. 
Group, German and French. 

Louise Foley, of Minnesota. 

Prepared by Miss Mary E. Stevens, Germantown, Philadelphia. Group, 
English and Philosophy. 

Elizabeth Andros Foster, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by the Gilman School, Cambridge, Mass. Group, Latin and Italian 
and Spanish. 

Margaret Ladd Franklin, of Baltimore. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of First Bryn Mawr 
Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 
1901-02; Holder of Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1902-03, 1904-08. 
Group, Latin and English. 

Mabel Kathryn Frehafer, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1904-08. Group, Mathematics and Physics. 

Evelyn Dunn Gardner, of Montana. 

Prepared by the High School, Helena. University of Chicago, 1903-04. 
Group, Latin and French. 

Sarah Sanson Goldsmith, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1904-08. Group, Latin and English. 

Helen Ridenour Greeley, of Chicago. 

Prepared by the John Dewey School, Chicago, and by Miss Florence Baldwin's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Latin and French. 



107 

Cornelia Jeanette Griffith, of Ohio. 

Prepared by the Balliol School, Utica, N.Y- -Group, History and Economics 
and Politics. 

Katharine Venai Barley, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa. Group, Philosophy 
and Economics and Politics. 

Theresa Helburn, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by Miss Winsor's School, Boston, by Miss Florence Baldwin's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private study. Group, English and Phil- 
osophy. 

Louise Hyman, of New York City. 

Prepared by Dr. J. Sachs's School for Girls, New York City. Group, History 
and Economics and Politics. 

Anne Warren Jackson, of Delaware. 

Prepared by the Misses Hebb's School, Wilmington. Group, History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Dorothy May Jones, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the High School, Scranton. Group, Latin and German. 

Margaret Carroll Jones, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by Miss Hills's School, Philadelphia, and by private tuition. Group, 
Latin and English. 

Mabel Matthewson Keiller, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Central High School, Washington, D. C, and by the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Latin and English. 

Anna King, of Connecticut. 

Prepared by Miss Low's School, Stamford, and by private tuition. Group, 
Greek and Latin. 

Mary Anderson Kinsley, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1904-08. Group, Latin and English. 

Margaret Charlton Lewis, of New Jersey. 

Prepared by St. Timothy's School, Catonsville, Md. Group, English and 
French. 

Mayone Lewis, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of Trustees' 
Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1904-08 ; Holder . of the 
James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 1905-06 : Holder of the Maria 
L. Eastman Brooke Hall Memorial Scholarship, 1907-08. Group, Greek 
and Latin. 

Caroline Florence Lexow, of New Jersey. 

Prepared by Miss Mary E. Stevens, Germantown, Philadelphia. Holder 
of the Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and 
the Southern States, 1900-01. Group, Economics and Politics and Philos- 
ophy. 

Minnie Kendrick List, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of Minnie Mur- 
doch Kendrick Scholarship, 1903-08. Group, Greek and Latin. 

Margaret Ryerson Maynard, of New York. 

Prepared by Miss Florence Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, His- 
tory and Economics and Politics. 

Caroline Alexander McCook, of New York City. 

Prepared by Miss Spence's School, New York City, and by private tuition. 
Group, French and English. 

Virginia Spotswood McKenney, of Virginia. 

Prepared by the Southern Female College, Petersburg, and by private tui- 
tion. Group, History and Economics and Politics. 



108 

Cornelia Lynde Meigs, of Iowa. 

Prepared by private study. Group, History and Economics and Politics. 

Dorothy Merle-Smith, of New York City. 

Prepared by Miss Spence's School, New York City. Group, French and 
Italian and Spanish. 

Louise Milligan, of Indiana. 

Prepared by the Shortridge High School, Indianapolis, and by private tui- 
tion. Holder of the first Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the 
Western States, 1904-05. Group, English and Philosophy. 

Jacqueline Pascal Morris, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Friends' Select School, Philadelphia. Group, History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Margaret Morris, of Connecticut. 

Prepared by Miss Willard's School, and by the High School, New Haven.' 
Holder of the First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the New 
England States, 1904-05. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Dorothy Mort, of Michigan. 

Prepared by the Detroit Home and Day School. Group, English and Philos- 
ophy. 

Helen Virginia North, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1904-08. Group, Latin and German. 

Elsa Norton, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Friends' Select School, by Miss Hills's School, Philadelphia, 
and by private tuition. Group, German and French. 

Frances Passmore, of Minnesota. 

Prepared by Stanley Hall, Minneapolis, by the Dwight School, Englewood, 
N. J., and by private tuition. Group, History and Economics and Politics. 

Martha Plaisted, of Virginia. 

Prepared by the Balliol School, Utica, N. Y. Holder of Maria Hopper 
Scholarship, 1905-06 ; Holder of the Mary E. Stevens Scholarship, 1906-07. 
Group, English and Philosophy. 

Laura Leisenring Pollock, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by Miss Florence Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by 
private tuition. Group, Mathematics and Physics. 

Josephine Voorhees Proudfit, of Wisconsin. 

Prepared by the High School, Madison, and by private tuition. Group, 
History and Economics and Politics. 

Eleanor Ferguson Rambo, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1904-08. Group, Greek and Latin. 

Ina May Richter, of California. 

Prepared by the Miss West's School, San Francisco, by Miss Florence Bald- 
win's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. Group, Chemistry 
and Biology. 

Miriam Vaughan Ristine, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa. Group, Latin 
and French. 

Louise Elizabeth Roberts, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Central High School, Kansas City, Mo. Holder of the 
James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship, 1906-07. Group, Greek and Mathe- 
matics. 

Alice Sachs, of New York City. 

Prepared by Dr. J. Sachs's School for Girls, New York City. Group, German 
and French. 



109 

Sakah Minier Sanborne, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of Trustees' 
Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1904-08. Group, Latin and 
Mathematics. 

Ethelinda Florence Schaefer, of Honolulu. 

Prepared by the High School, Honolulu, and by private study. Group, Latin 
and German. 

Caroline Frank Schock, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by Maryland College. Group, Mathematics and Chemistry. 

Nellie Marguerite Seeds, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1904-08. Group, History and Economics and Politics. 

Lydia Trimble Sharpless, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa., and by private 
study. Holder of Foundation Scholarship, 1905-08. Group, English and 
German. 

Louise Pettibone Smith, of New York. 

Prepared by the Ogdensburg Free Academy and by the Balliol School, Utica, 
N. Y. Holder of the Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for 
New York, New Jersey, and Delaware, 1904-05 ; Holder of Maria Hopper 
Scholarship, 1905-06 ; Holder of the Anna M. Powers Scholarship, and of 
the James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship, 1906-07. Group, Greek and Latin. 

Dorothy Straus, New York City. 

Prepared by Dr. J. Sachs's School for Girls, New York City. Holder of 
the First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for New York, New Jersey, 
and Delaware, 1904-05. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Ethel Phillips Vick, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the State Model School, Trenton, N. J. Group, Greek and Latin. 
Marjorie Newton Wallace, of New Jersey. 

Prepared by the Dearborn-Morgan School, Orange, and by private tuition. 
Group, History and Economics and Politics. 

Mary Kirk Waller, of Illinois. 

Prepared by the High School, Oak Park, 111., and by Miss Master's School, 
Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. Group, Economics and Politics and Philosophy. 

Margaret Washburn, of Minnesota. 

Prepared by Stanley Hall, Minneapolis. Group, History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Anna Welles, of France. 

Prepared by Villa Dupont, Paris, and by Miss Florence Baldwin's School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. Holder of the Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar- 
ship for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1904-05. Group, Economics 
and Politics and Philosophy. 

Hazel Cooper Whitelaw, of Ohio. 

Prepared by the Hathaway-Brown School, Cleveland. Group, French and 
Italian and Spanish. 

Grace Adeline Woodelton, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Horace Mann School and by the Finch School, New York 
City. Group, Latin and French. 

Marjorie Young, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by the Girls' Latin School, Boston. Group, English and French. 



IV. 

College Preachers for the Year 1907-08. 

October 2nd. — Pbofessob Geoege A. Barton. 

October 16th. — The Rev. Robert Ellis Thompson, Ph.D., S.T.D., 
Principal of the Boys' Central High School, Philadelphia. 

October 30th. — Mb. Edwabd Gbubb of London, Editor of The British 
Friend. 

November 13th. — The Rev. Hugh Black, M.A., Jesup Graduate Pro- 
fessor of Practical Theology, Union Theological Seminary. 

December 11th. — Mr. Robert Elliott Speer, Secretary of the Presby- 
terian Board of Foreign Missions. 

January 8th. — The Rev. David McConnell Steele, D.D., Rector of 
St. Luke's Epiphany Church, Philadelphia. 

February 19th. — The Rev. Shailer Mathews, D.D., Professor of 
Historical and Comparative Theology and Dean of the Divinity 
School, Chicago University. 

March 4th. — The Rev. Chables F. Shaw, D.D., Pastor of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Rahway, N. J. 

March 18th.— The Rev. William R. Richabds, D.D., of the Brick 
Presbyterian Church, New York City. 

April 8th. — The Rt. Rev. William Neilson McVickab, D.D., S.T.D,, 
Bishop of Rhode Island. 

April 29th. — The Rev. Father Huntington, of the House of the 
Holy Cross, West Park, N. Y. 

May 13th. — The Rev. Chables Wood, D.D., Pastor of the Church of 
the Covenant, Washington, D. C. 

May 31st. — The Rev. Hugh Black, M.A., Jesup Graduate Professor 
of Practical Theology, Union Theological Seminary. (Baccalau- 
reate Preacher.) 



(110) 



V. 

Addresses Given During the Year 1907-08. 

Commencement Address. 

Peesident Arthur Twining Hadley, President of Yale Univer- 
sity, "The Relation between College Education and General 
Culture." 

Founder's Lecture. 

Dean Geokge Hodges, Dean of the Episcopal Theological School, 
Cambridge, Mass., "The Hanging of Mary Dyer." 

College Lectures. 

Me. J. Cobden-Sandeeson of London, "The Book Beautiful." 
Me. James Fitzmaueice-Kelley of England, "Modern Spanish 

Novelists." 
De. Paul Clemen, Professor of History of Art, University of 

Bonn, "Boecklin." 
Mb. Edmund Pbivat, Secretary of the General Congress of 

Esperanto and Lecturer before the Philadelphia Esperanto 

Society, "Esperanto." 

Before the Christian Union. 

Db. Julius A. Bewee, Professor in Union Theological Seminary, 
De. Abthub S. Lloyd, Secretary of the Episcopal Board of 

Missions. 
The Rev. Hugh Bibckhead, Rector of St. George's Episcopal 

Church, New York City. 

The Rev. Floyd W. Tomejns, D.D., Rector of Holy Trinity 

Church, Philadelphia. 
Miss Maby E. Richmond, Secretary of the Charity Organisation 

Society of Philadelphia, "Social Work as a Profession." 
Pbofessob Geoege Albeet Coe of Northwestern University, "The 

Possibility of a Non-Mystical Religious Experience." 
Miss Caeolena Wood of Mt. Kisco, N. Y. 
Pbofessob Abthub C. McGiffebt of Union Theological Seminary, 

"The Trend of Modern Thought." 
Pbofessob Rufus M. Jones of Haverford College, "The Prophetic 

Vision." 

(Ill) 



112 

Before the College Equal Suffrage Chapter. 

Mrs. Cobden-Sandeeson of Loudon, "Why I Went to Prison." 
Miss Jane Addams of Hull House, Chicago, "Social Legislation 
and the Need of the Ballot for Women." 

Before the Consumers' League. 

Professor Henry Raymond Mussey, "Twentieth Century Democ- 
racy." 

Before the English Club. 

Mr. William Morton Fulleeton, "The Lesson of Henry James." 
Mr. Roger E. Fry of England, Curator of Paintings in the Metro- 
politan Museum of Art in New York, "Expression and 
Representation in Art." 
Mr. Paul Elmer More, Associate Editor of The Nation, "Sir 
Thomas Browne." 

Before the German Club. 

Dr. Karl Detlev Jessen, "Nietsche." 

Before the Graduate Club. 

President M. Caeey Thomas, "Present Tendencies in Women's 

University Education." 
De. Paul Haupt, Professor of Semitic Languages, Johns Hopkins 

University, "The Song of Solomon in Relation to Goethe 

and Herder." 
Peofessob Caeleton F. Beown, "Paganismus Redivivus." 
Miss Lauea J. Wylie, Professor of English, Vassar College, 

"Wordsworth's Social Theories." 

Before the Laio Club. 

Mb. Feanklin Spenceb Edmunds, "Civil Service Reform." 

Before the League for the Service of Christ. 

Mrs. R. R. Poetee Beadfoed, Head of the Light-house Settle- 
ment, Kensington. 

The Rev. C. A. R. Janviee, D.D., Pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church, Broad Street, Philadelphia. 

The Rt. Rev. Logan Roots, D.D., Bishop of Hankow, China. 

Mes. G. P. Meeeett, General Secretary of the Y. W. C. A., of 
Barnard College. 



113 

Before the Oriental Club. 

Mrs. Inago Nitobe, "The Status of Women in Japan." 
The Rev. John D. Peters, D.D., "My Discoveries in Palestine and 
Babylonia." 

Before the Philosophical Club. 

Miss Ethel D. Puffer, "The ^Esthetic Experience." 
Professor Theodore de Leo de Laguna, "The Psychological Basis 
of Pragmatism." 

Before the Science Club. 

Mr. Willis L. Moore, Chief of the Weather Bureau, Washington, 
D. C, "Storms." 

Before the College Settlement Association. 

Miss Gertrude Day, of Vassar College, Assistant Head Worker 
in the New York College Settlement, "College Settlements in 
Relation to Social Work." 



VI. 

Gifts Received by the College During the Year 1907-08. 

Our sincere gratitude is due for the following gifts 
which have been received during the past year, in addition 
to special books given to the library which are enumerated 
and acknowledged in the report of the Librarian : 

From the Alumnse Association of Bryn Mawr College 
towards the decoration of the ceiling of the Reading Room of 
the Library, $485.54. 

From the Alumna? Association of the Girls' High and 
Normal School, Philadelphia, for the L. C. B. Saul Memorial 
Scholarship, $100. 

From anonymous donor for a special scholarship, $300. 

From the Board of Education of the City of Philadel- 
phia, for city scholarships, $2,245. 

From the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md., for 
scholarships, $2,450. 

From the Class of 1893, on the occasion of its fifteenth 
anniversary, the sum of $515.83 to be spent on books for the 
English department as a memorial to Madeline Vaughan 
Abbott Bushnell. 

From Miss Mary E. Garrett for fellowships and grad- 
uate scholarships, $5,293.80; for competitive entrance schol- 
arships, $1,800; for art and archseology, $400; for publi- 
cation of college monographs, $466.18 ; for the geological 
department, $300; for lectures, $133.29; for library book 
plate, $102.85; for the English Club, $24.96; for the Grad- 
uate Club, $36.40; for decoration of halls and buildings, 
$385.66; for manuscripts, $70 ; for reference books for the 
President's office, $25; for books for the library, $323.54; 
for annual subscriptions to the American Schools of Classical 
Studies at Athens and Rome, the Marine Biological Labora- 
tory at Wood's Holl and to the Woman's Table at Naples 
Zoological Station, $600. 

(114) 



123 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 1907-08 

continued. 





Course 


Instructor 


Hours 
Weekly 


No. in Class 


Department 


1st 
Sem. 


2nd 
Sem. 




English Composition, required, 

English Critics of the Nine- 
Anglo-Saxon Grammar and 


Miss Donnelly, 

Miss Fullerton, 

Dr. Crandall, 

Dr. Hatcher, 

Miss King 

Miss Ward 

Dr. Clark 
Miss Donnelly 

Dr. Brown 

Dr. Clark 

Dr. Brown 

Dr. Clark 

Dr. Crandall 

Miss Fullerton 

Mr. King 

Miss Pillsbury 

Dr. Clark 
Dr. Brown 


9 


..77.. 


. .76.. 




.. .3.. 

...2.. 
.. .3. . 


..20.. 

.. 8.. 
. . 4.. 


..20.. 

. . 8.. 




Middle English Poetry, minor 
Classical and Romantic Prose, 

English Ballad, free elective,. 
Victorian Poets, free elective . 
Argumentation, free elective. 
Descriptive and Narrative 

Writing, free elective 

General Reading of Prose Au- 

Literary History of the Bible, 


. . 4.. 




.. .3.. 

...1.. 
...2.. 
...2.. 

...1.. 


..17.. 
..5.. 
..11.. 


..15.. 
..5.. 
..18.. 

. . 5.. 




.. .2.. 
...1.. 


..11.. 
..10.. 


. . 4.. 






. . 5.. 




Graduate Courses 

Seminary in English Litera- 


.. .3.. 
.. .3.. 
...2.. 


..2.. 
..6.. 
. . 4. . 


.. 2.. 
..6.. 

. . 4.. 




Seminary in Elizabethan 




...2. . 


. . 5. . 


. . 5.. 




English Journal Club 

Elementary German, Gram- 
mar and Translation 

Lectures on the History of Ger- 
man Literature from the 
earliest times to the time of 
Klopstock, exclusive, minor 
German Critical Reading, 

Grammar and Prose Corn- 
Lectures on the History of Ger- 
man Literature from Klop- 
stock to the present time, 
and Selected Reading.major 
German Reading, Faust, Part 

German Prose Composition, 


Dr. Brown, Dr. 

Clark and 

Dr. Hatcher 

Miss Chamber- 

lin 

Dr. Weyhe 
Dr. Jessen 

Dr. Jessen 

Dr. Weyhe 

Dr. Jessen 
Miss Chamber- 
lin 

Dr. Jessen 

Dr. Weyhe 


.. .1. . 


. ..6. . 


. . 6.. 


German 


.. .2 . 
...3.. 

...3.. 
...1.. 
.. .1.. 

.. .3.. 


..12.. 

..29.. 
..30.. 

..12.. 

..13.. 
..5.. 


..11.. 

..25.. 
..12.. 
..13.. 




German Literature from 1850 
to the present time and Crit- 
ical Reading, post-major. . . . 

German Syntax and Composi- 


..3.. 




.. .2. . 


. . 4. . 


. . 3.. 




Graduate Courses 

Seminary in German Litera- 


.. .2. . 


. . 5. . 


. . 2.. 


Teutonic 


Graduate Courses 
Introduction to Teutonic Phil- 


...1.. 
...2.. 
...2.. 
...2.. 


.. 2.. 
.. 3.. 

.. 4.. 
.. 1.. 


. 1 






.. 1.. 
2 






. 1 . 









124 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 1907-08 

continued. 



Department 



French. 



Italian. 



Spanish. 



Semitic Lan- 
guages and 

Biblical Lit- 
erature. . . . 



History . 



Course 



Elementary French Grammar 
and Translation 

History of French Literature, 
minor 

French Reading and Composi- 
tion, minor 

History of French Literature, 
major 

French Reading and Composi- 
tion, major 

Romantic Drama, post-major 

The Short Story, post major.. 

Teachers' Course in Advanced 
French 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Modern French 
Literature 

Seminary in Rousseau 

Old French Philology 

Old French Readings 

Romance Languages, Journal 
Club 

Italian, minor 

Italian Masterpieces, minor. . 

Italian, major 

Graduate Course 

Graduate Italian 

Spanish, minor 

Spanish Literature, major. . . . 

Spanish Reading, major 

Spanish Composition, major. . 

Graduate Course 

Advanced Spanish 

Oriental History, minor 

New Testament Biography, 
free elective 

Old Testament Canon, free 
elective 

Graduate Courses 

New Testament Seminary . . . 

Hebrew Seminary 

Aramaic 

Elementary Hebrew 

Biblical Archaeology 

Assyrian 

Assyrian Seminary 

History of Europe to the period 
of the Renaissance, minor. . 

History of Europe from the 
Renaissance to the close of 
the Religious Wars, minor . . 

Modern History, from the 
Treaty of Westphalia to the 
close of the Napoleonic Cam- 
paigns, major 

Modern History, from the Con- 
gress of Vienna to the pres- 
ent time, major 

English Constitutional His- 
tory, post-major 

Topics in Nineteenth Century 
History, post-major 





Hours 
Weekly 


No. in Class 


Instructor 


1st 


2d 






Sem. 


Sem. 




.. .5. . 


.. 2. . 


..1.. 


M. Foulet 


.. .3.. 






Dr. Schinz 


.. .2.. 


..30.. 




.. 


.. .3. . 


..7.. 


. . 8. . 


M. Foulet 
Dr. Schinz 


.. .2.. 
...3 . 
.. .2.. 


.. 6.. 
..5.. 
..11. 


.. 8.. 
..6.. 
..10.. 


" 


.. .1.. 


.. 6. 


.. 6.. 


M. Foulet 

Dr. Schinz 

Dr. Holbrook 


.. .3.. 
...2.. 
.. .2.. 
.. .1. . 


..4.. 
..2.. 
..2.. 
.. 2. . 


.. 4.. 
.. 2.. 
.. 2.. 
. . 1. . 


M. Foulet 

Dr. DeHaan 

Dr. Schinz 


.. .1. . 


.. 5. . 


. . 5. . 


Dr. Holbrook 


.. .3.. 
.. .2.. 
.. .3. . 


..19.. 
.. 7.. 
.. 4. . 


..14.. 
.. 7.. 
. . 4. . 


,, 


.. .1. . 


..1.. 


.. 1. . 


Dr. DeHaan 


.. .5. . 
.. .2.. 
.. .2.. 
.. .1. . 


..16.. 
.. 2.. 
..2.. 
. . 2. . 


..16.. 
.. 2.. 
.. 2.. 
.. 2. . 


,, 


.. .5. . 


.. 2. . 


. . 2. . 


Dr. Barton 




..11.. 


..16.. 


" 


.. .2.. 




..27.. 


.. 


.. .1.. 


.. 8.. 


.. 7.. 


" 


.. .1.. 
.. .1.. 
. . .2. . 


.. 3.. 
.. 3.. 
. . 2. . 


.. 3.. 
.. 3.. 
.. 2 




.. .1. . 


.. 1. . 


.. 1. . 


Dr. Barton 

Miss Downing 

Dr. Barton 


.. .1.. 
.. .2.. 
.. .1. 


.. 3.. 

..2.. 
..1.. 


.. 3.. 
•'2.. 
.. 1.. 


Mr. Johnston 


.. .5.. 


..51. . 




Dr. Smith 


.. .5.. 




..56.. 


Dr. Smith 


.. .5.. 


..36.. 




Mr. Johnston 






..37.. 


Dr. Smith 


.. .3. . 


.. 8. . 


..10.. 


Mr. Johnston 


.. .2.. 


..8.. 


.. 8.. 



125 

Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 1907-08 

continued.- '■* 



Department 



Economics 
and Politics 



Law. 



Philosophy... 



Education. . 



History of 
Art and 
Classical 
Archaeol- 
ogy 



Mathematics 



Graduate Courses 

Historical Method and Crit- 
icism 

History of the French Revo 
lution 

Seminary in American Politi- 
cal History 

Historical Journal Club 

Introduction to Economics, 
minor 

Applied Economics, minor. . . 

History of Economics, major. 

Theoretical Economics, major 

Utilitarian Theory in Modern 
Economics, post-major. . . . 

Public Finance, post-major. . 

Graduate Courses 

Public Finance 

Economic Seminary. 

Economics Journal Club 



Law of Contract, minor 

Theory of Legal Procedure. 



Course 



Instructor 



Hours 
Weekly 



History of Philosophy, re- 
quired 

Psychology, required 

Problems inMetaphysics, niin- 



Mr. Johnston 



Dr. Smith 

Mr. Johnston 

Dr. Smith 

Dr. Williamson 
Miss Parris 



Dr. Williamson 

Dr. Smith 
Miss Parris 
Dr. Williamson 
Miss Parris 
Dr. Ashley 



Ethics, minor 

Philosophy of Kant, major. . 
Philosophy of Kant, major. . 

Psychology, minor 

Psychology, major 

Graduate Courses 

Ethical Seminary 



Dr. De Laguna 
Mr. Ferree 

Dr G.DeLagnua 
Dr.T.DeLaguna 
Dr.G.DeLaguna 
Dr.T.DeLaguna 
Mr. Ferree 
Mr. Ferree 

DrT.DeLaguna 



History of 
elective . . 



Education, free; Miss Fernald 



History of Painting, free elec- 
tive j Dr. Ransom 

Greek and Roman Industrial 

Arts, free elective j " 

Graduate Courses 

Archaeological Seminary " 

Archaeological Journal Club . . 

Archaeology ■ " 

Trigonometry, free elective. . .] Mr. Wright 

Fundamental Theorems of 

Mathematics, free elective.. Dr. Scott 

Analytical Conies and Theory 
of Equations, minor 

Algebra and Elementary Dif- 
ferential and Integral Cal- 
culus, minor Mr. Wright 

Differential and Integral Cal- 
culus, Differential Equa- 
tions and Theory of Equa- 
tions, major ' " 

Analytical Geometry, Curve 
Tracing and Hist ory of Math- 
ematics, major | Dr. Scott 



No. in Class 



1st 
Sem. 



..3. 
. .3. 
. .3. 
. .3. 

,. .2. 
,. .2. 



.. .2.. 
.. .1. . 



15 



. 9. 
. 6. 
,13. 



2nd 
Sem. 



13 



15 



.59. 



. 1 3 . 



126 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 1907-08 

continued. 



Department 



Physics. 



Chemistry. 



Geology. 



Biology . 



Course 



Modern Analytical Geometry, 
post-major 

Differential Equations, post 
major 

Graduate Courses 

Plane Algebraic Curves ..... 

Differential Geometry , 

Mathematical Journal Club. . , 

Heat, Light and Properties of 
Matter, minor 

Sound, Electricity and Mag- 
netism, minor 

Laboratory work, minor.. . 

Theory of Light, Mechanics, 
major 

Theory of Heat, Electricity 
and Magnetism, major 

Laboratory work, major. 

Electricity and Magnetism, 

post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Physical Optics 

Physics Journal Club 

Introduction to General Chem- 
istry, minor 

Introduction to Organic Chem- 
istry, minor . 

Laboratory work, minor 

Theoretical Chemistry, major. 
Organic Chemistry, major. . . . 
Laboratory work, major 

Inorganic Chemistry, post- 
major 

Graduate Courses 

Laboratory work 

Physical Chemistry 

Chemical Seminary and Jour- 
nal Club 

Physiography, minor 

Meteorology, free elective 

Lithology, minor 

Oceanography 

Historical Geology, major. . . . 

Glacial and Structural Geol- 
ogy, Major 

General Biology 

Plants, minor 

Vertebrates and Embryology, 
minor 

Laboratory Work, minor 

Animal Physiology, major.. . . 

Laboratory Work, major 

General Zoology, major 

Laboratory Work, major.. . . 

Protochordates, post-major.. 



Instructor 



Dr. Scott 
Mr. Wright 

Dr. Scott 

Mr. Wright 

Dr. Scott and 

Mr. Wright 

Dr. Huff 

Dr. Barnes 
Dr. Huff and 
Dr. Barnes 



Dr. Huff 

Dr. Huff and 

Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Huff 

Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Huff and 

Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Kohler 

Dr. Forbes 
Dr. Kohler 
Dr. Forbes 
Dr. Forbes 
Dr. Kohler 
Dr. Kohler 
Dr. Forbes 

Dr. Kohler 

Dr. Kohler 
Dr. Forbes 
Dr. Kohler 
Dr. Forbes 
Miss Heritage 
Dr. Bascom 
Dr. Ohern 



Dr. Bascom 
Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Randolph 
Dr. Warren 
Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Warren 
Dr. Randolph 
Dr. Warren 

Dr. Tennent 

Dr. Warren 

Dr. Randolph 

Dr. Tennent 





No. lis 


Class 


Hours 
Weekly 






1st 


2nd 




Sem. 


Sem. 


.. .2.. 


..4.. 


.. 3. . 


...2.. 


..3.. 


. . 3. . 


...2.. 
.. .2. . 


.. 3.. 
.. 3. . 


.. 3.. 
..3.. 


...1.. 


. . 5. . 


.. 5. . 
































.. .5. . 


. . 5. . 




.. .3. . 


. . 2.. 


.. 2. . 


.. .3. 


.. 1.. 




...1.. 


.. 1. . 


.. 1.. 


.. .5.. 






.. .5.. 


..22.. 




.. .5.. 
...5.. 


..22.. 
.. 5.. 


..21.. 


..5.. 


.. 5. . 


.. 5. . 


.. .3.. 


.. 4. . 


.. 4. . 


...3.. 
...3.. 


.. 2.. 
. . 2. . 


.. 2.. 
. . 2.. 


.. .1.. 


..3.. 


..3.. 


...5.. 
.. .2.. 

...5.. 
..2.. 


..14.. 
.. 8.. 


'. '. i4! '. 

.. 9.. 








.. 4. . 
..1.. 


. 61.. 
..61.. 




..5.. 




..61.. 


. . 5.. 


..61.. 


..61.. 


. . 5. . 
5 


..6.. 
..6.. 




.. 5.. 
. 1.. 


.. 6.. 
..2.. 


.. 6.. 
.. 2.. 



127 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of . Instruction given in 1907-08 

continued. 





Course 


Instructor 


Hours 
Weekly 


No. IN 


Class 


Depabtment 


1st 
Sem. 


2nd 

Sem. 




Laboratory Work, post-major 

Morphology, post-major 

Laboratory Work, Morphol- 


Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Stevens 

Dr. Warren 
Dr. Warren 
Dr. Tennent 

Dr. Stevens 

Dr. Tennent 

Dr. Warren and 

Dr. Stevens 


3 to 7 
. . 1. . 


.. 2.. 
..2.. 


.. 2.. 
.. 1.. 




3 to 5 

. . 1. . 


. . 2. 


.. 1.. 




Advanced Physiology, post- 


. . 2. . 


.. 2. . 




Laboratory Work, Physiol- 


. . 5. . 


. . 2.. 


..2.. 




Protoplasm and the Cell, post- 


.. 1. . 


. . 1. . 


.. 2. . 




Graduate Courses 


.. 1.. 




Journal Club and Seminary . . 


.. 1. . 


2 


.. 1.. 














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XI. 

Resolutions in Memory of David Scull, Trustee of Bryn 
Mawr College from 1880 to 1&0? ' , and Director of the 
College from 1906 to 1907. 

Born, January 17, 1836. Died, November 22, 1907. 

At an annual meeting of the Trustees of Bryn Mawr 
College held December 6, 1907, the Chairman announced the 
death of David Scull, President of this body, and the follow- 
ing minute was unanimously adopted: — 

"Information was now received of the death on Novem- 
ber 22, 1907, at his home, at Overbrook, Philadelphia, in the 
seventy-second year of his age, of David Scull, President of 
this body. 

"It is hardly possible adequately to set forth the loss to 
ourselves, to the College, and especially to its President. In 
the poet's words: 

What practice howsoe'er expert, 
In fitting aptest words to things, 
Or voice the richest toned that sings, 
Hath power to give thee as thou wert?- 

"David Scull, for a time a student at Westtown Boarding 
School, graduated from Haverford College in 1854, and 
retired from a successful business life in 1891, although he 
continued to take part in the management of some business 
and financial corporations. 

"He early became interested in the educational work of 
Friends, having been a Manager of Haverford College since 
1865, Treasurer of the Corporation for many years, and a 
liberal contributor to its support. For nearly thirty years 
he was a member of the Corporation chartered by William 
Penn, having the William Penn Charter School under its care. 

"Dr. Joseph W. Taylor, in his will, named David Scull 
one of the thirteen Friends who, with their successors, were to 
form the corporation, "The Trustees of Bryn Mawr College", 
and on the organisation of this Corporation he was chosen its 
Secretary, which post he filled until May 10, 1895, when, 
being elected Vice-President, he resigned. He served as Vice- 
President until the Annual Meeting, December 2, 1904, and 
then retired on account of a prolonged visit to Europe. Upon 

133 



134 

bis return, lie was elected President, October 19, 1906. He 
also served as Cbairman of tbe Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds for nineteen years, from 1885 to 1904, wben be 
resigned prior to tbe visit to Europe, above mentioned. Of 
late' years, ill bealtb and mucb absence from borne at times 
prevented bis taking an active part in tbe management of tbe 
College, but neitber ill bealtb nor absence lessened bis interest 
in it. It was always very near to bis be art and its welfare 
one of bis cbief concerns. 

"He was also connected witb mucb cbaritable and pbilan- 
tbropic work, and, at one time, took an active part in political 
affairs in Pbiladelpbia, as a member of tbe bistoric Com- 
mittee of One Hundred. 

"He was an Elder among friends, in tbe Montbly Meeting 
of Friends of Pbiladelpbia for tbe Western District, and was 
a deeply convinced member of our Society, whose spiritual 
views of Cbristian trutb appealed strongly to bis mind and 
heart. But while a loyal member of bis own Church, bis 
spiritual interest and outlook were not confined within its 
limits. His sympathies were broad and catholic, and espe- 
cially was he greatly concerned and exercised as to the move- 
ment and development of modern religious thought. He 
pondered much and wrote mucb on these themes : 

He would not make his judgment blind, 
He faced the spectres of the mind 
And laid them. 

"In social life, be was a delightful companion; one of 
those rare persons who attract to themselves tbe cordial friend- 
ship and admiration of all with whom they come in contact. 
To him belonged 'the grand old name of gentleman', by 
every gracious attribute which clusters around that good 
word. Manly and charming in personality, noble in coun- 
tenance, gentle in spirit, courteous to every one, alert in mind, 
refined in taste, with a keen and subtle appreciation of what 
is best in everything, and strong with the strength which 
comes from a pure heart, — all this we can say of our friend. 
And to this charm of person, this grace of manner, this fine 
humour, this crowning favour, of tbe indwelling of God's 
Holy Spirit, there was added that final test of a noble soul — 
utter unconsciousness of self. 



135 

"Truly, it was his desire to be among us as one that 
serveth. His eye fastened upon the' Great Pattern, his soul 
fixed upon the King in His beauty, that which others saw in 
him, he did not see. His concern about himself was that he 
might be a humble, faithful follower of his Lord and Master, 
Jesus Christ, his Saviour. 

"The blessing which he coveted, we may reverently 
believe to be his : 'Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst 
after righteousness : for they shall be filled.' 

"In thinking of such men, we are reminded of that Scrip- 
ture : 'And the world passeth away, and the lust thereof ; but 
he that doeth the will of God abideth forever.' " 

Minute Adopted by the Board of Directors of the Trustees 

of Bryn Mawr College at a Stated Meeting held 

December 20, 1907. 

"In the list of officers and directors of the Corporation, 
just minuted, one honoured and beloved name is missing. 

"David Scull died on November 22, 1907, at his home, at 
Overbrook, Philadelphia, in the seventy-second year of his 
age. He was a member of the Corporation, having been one 
of the thirteen Trustees named by Dr. Taylor in his will. He 
was the first Secretary of the Corporation and Board of 
Directors, serving until May 10, 1895, when, being elected 
Vice-President, he resigned. He served as Vice-President 
until the annual meeting, December 2, 1904, and then retired 
on account of a long visit to Europe. Upon his return he was 
elected President, October 19, 1906. He also served as 
Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds for 
nineteen years, from 1885 to 1904, when he resigned, prior 
to the visit to Europe, above mentioned. 

"We will not enter into eulogy. His memory is secure in 
the hearts of all who knew him. We have lost a dear friend 
and colleague, and the College an earnest and constant sup- 
porter, while its President has met the double loss, either so 
hard to bear, of a beloved and faithful, life-long friend, and 
of a Trustee devotedly helpful to her in her College work. 

"Absence from home prevented him from taking part in 
procuring the amendments to our Charter, enlarging the 
Board of Directors and providing for alumnse representation 



136 

upon it, but he was fully advised of the movement, which had 
his entire and hearty approval. It is grateful to recall that he 
was able to be present at the meetings of the enlarged Board, 
and to extend a cordial, personal welcome to each of the new 
members. 

"May the mantle of his spirit cover us in all our delib- 
erations. So, will it be well for us, and for the College whose 
interests and welfare we have in charge." 

Resolutions passed by the Faculty of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege: 

Whereas the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College has learned 
with sincere sorrow of the death on the twenty-second of 
jSTovember, 1907, of David Scull, one of the original 
Trustees appointed by the Founder of the College in his will 
in 1877, and actively engaged in the service of the College 
from its incorporation in 1880 until the time of his death: 

Resolved, That we, the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College, 
desire to record our appreciation of his self-sacrificing devo- 
tion to our welfare and our gratitude for the wisdom, care, 
and insight with which he laboured for Bryn Mawr College 
during twenty-seven years. 

Resolved further, That a copy of this resolution be sent 
to his family and to the Directors of Bryn Mawr College. 

Resolutions passed by the Alumna? Association of Bryn 
Mawr College : 

Whereas the College has suffered a great loss by the 
death on November 22, 1907, of David Scull, one of the 
original Trustees appointed by the Founder of the College 
and for twenty-seven years an untiring worker for its 
welfare. 

Resolved, That we, the Alumna? Association of Bryn 
Mawr College, record our gratitude for the noble-hearted 
wisdom and clear-sighted integrity so long and generously 
devoted to our interests and our personal sense of loss and 
sorrow. 

Resolved further, That a copy of this resolution be sent 
to the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



THE PRESIDENT 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



1908-09. 



Philadelphia : 

the john c. winston co. 

1909. 



CoEPOEATION. 

BOAED OF TeUSTEES. 

Academic Yeae, 1909-10. 

Howard Comfort, 
President. 

Asa S. Wing, Edward Bettle, Jr., 

Treasurer. Secretary. 

Albert K. Smiley. Alexander C. Wood. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. M. Carey Thomas. 

Howard Comfort. Francis R. Cope, Jr. 

Justus C. Strawbridge. Asa S. Wing. 

James Wood. Charles J. Rhoads. 

Rufus M. Jones. Thomas Raeburn White. 
Frederic H. Strawbridge. 

Boaed of Dieectobs. 

Academic Year, 1909-10. 

Howard Comfort. 

Chairman. 

Asa S. Wing, Edward Bettle, Jr., 

Treasurer. Secretary. 

Albert K. Smiley. Francis R. Cope, Jr. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. Asa S. Wing. 

Howard Comfort. Charles J. Rhoads. 

Justus C Strawbridge. Thomas Raeburn White. 

James Wood. Frederic H. Strawbridge. 

Rufus M. Jones. Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 

Alexander C. Wood. Mary E. Garrett. 

M. Carey Thomas. Anna Rhoads Ladd. 

Executive Committee. 
Howard Comfort. M. Carey Thomas. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. Francis R. Cope, Jr. 

Rufus M. Jones. James Wood. 

Committee on Buildings and Geounds. 
Alexander C. Wood. Charles J. Rhoads. 

Asa S. Wing. Mary E. Garrett. 

M. Carey Thomas. Frederic H. Strawbridge. 

Finance Committee. 
Alexander C. Wood. Charles J. Rhoads. 

Asa S. Wing. Justus C. Strawbridge. 

Mary E. Garrett. 

Libeaey Committee. 
Edward Bettle, Jr. Rufus M. Jones. 

Howard Comfort. Thomas Raeburn White. 

Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 

Religious Life Committee. 
Rufus M. Jones. James Wood. 

Asa S. Wing. 



Officers of Administration. 

Academic Yeae, 1909-10. 

President, 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D. 

Office : Taylor Hall. 

Assistant to the President, 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D. 

Office : Taylor Hall. 

Dean of the College, 
Marion Reilly, A.B. 
Office : The Library. 

Wardens, 
Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Pembroke Hall. 
Alice Anthony, A.B., Denbigh Hall. 
Virginia Tryon Stoddard, A.B., Radnor Hall. 
Harriet Jean Crawford, A.B., Rockefeller Hall. 
Bertha Margaret Laws, A.B., Pembroke Hall. 
Friedrika Margretha Heyl, A.B., Merion Hall. 

Secretary, 
Anna Bell Lawther, A.B. Office : Taylor Hall. 

Recording and Appointment Secretary, 
Ethel Walker, A.M. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Librarian, 
Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S. Office: The Library. 

Director of Athletics and Gymnastics, 
Constance M. K. Applebee. Office : The Gymnasium. 

Comptroller, 
James G. Forrester. Office : Taylor Hall. 

Business Manager, 
Joseph A. Skelley. Office : Taylor Hall. 

Junior Bursar, 
Anna Delany Fry, A.B. Office : Rockefeller Hall. 

Attending Physician of the College. 
Thomas F. Branson, M.D. Office hours, daily, 8 to 9.30 and 2 to 3, 
Rosemont, Penna. 

Visiting Physician of the College. 
Anne Heath Thomas, A.M., M.D. Office hours, daily, 1.30 to 3, 132 
South 18th Street, Philadelphia: Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and 
Saturdays, 4 to 6. 



Academic Appointments. 

Academic Year, 1909-10. 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the College and 
Professor of English. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1877 ; studied at the Johns Hopkins University, 
1877-78 ; University of Leipsic, 1879-82 ; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1882 ; 
Sorbonne and College de France, 1883 ; Dean of the Faculty of Bryn Mawr 
College and Professor of English, 1885-94. 

Charlotte Angas Scott, D.Sc, Alumnae Professor of Mathematics. 

Lincoln, England. Graduate in Honours, Girton College, University of Cam- 
bridge, England, 1880; B.Sc, University of London, 1882; Lecturer on 
Mathematics in Girton College, 1880-84 ; lectured in connection with Newn- 
ham College, University of Cambridge, England, 1880-83 ; D.Sc, University 
of London, 18S5. 

George A. Barton, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Literature and Semitic 
Languages. 

A.B., Haverford College, 1882, and A.M., 1885 ; studied under the direction of 
the American Institute of Hebrew, 18S5-86 ; Harvard University, 1888-91 ; 
Thayer Scholar, Harvard University, 1889-91 ; A.M., Harvard University, 
1890 ; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1891 ; Director of the American School 
of Oriental Study and Research in Palestine, 1902-03. 

Joseph W. Warren, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

A.B., Harvard College, 1871 ; University of Berlin, 1871-72 ; University of 
Leipsic, 1872-73 ; University of Bonn, 1873-79 ; M.D., University of Bonn, 
1880 ; Assistant and Instructor in Physiology, Harvard Medical School, 
1881-91 ; Lecturer in Medical Department of the University of the City of 
New York, 1885-86 ; Lecturer in Physiology, University of Michigan, 1889. 

Elmer P. Kohler, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., Muhlenberg College, 1886, and A.M., 1889 : Johns Hopkins University, 
1889-91 ; Fellow in Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 1891-92 ; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1892. 

Florence Bascom, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1882. B.Sc, 1884, and A.M., 1887 ; Johns 
Hopkins University, 1891-93 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Universitv, 1893 ; 
Assistant in Geology and Instructor in Petrography, Ohio State University, 
1893-95. . 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D., Assistant to the President and 
Associate in Mathematics. 

Reading, England. B.Sc, University of London, 1893, Ph.D.. Bryn Mawr 
College, 1896. and B.A., Trinity College. Dublin, 1905 ; Graduate in Hon- 
ours, First Class, in the Cambridge Mathematical Tripos, 1892 ; Graduate 
Student in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93, and Fellow in 
Mathematics, 1893-94 ; Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellow- 
ship, and Student in Mathematics, University of Gottingen, 1894-95. 

Wilmer Cave Wright, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Shrewsbury, England. Girton College, University of Cambridge. England, 
1888-92 ; Graduate in Honours, Cambridge Classical Tripos, 1892 ; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago, 1895 : Fellow in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1892- 
93 ; Fellow in Latin, University of Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in Greek, 
1894-95 ; Reader in Greek and Latin, University of Chicago, 1895-96. 

James H. Leuba, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Education and 
Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. B.S., University of Neuchatel, 1886 ; Ph.B., Ursinus 
College, 1888; Scholar in Psychology. Clark University, 1892-93: Fellow 
in Psychology, Clark University, 1893-95 ; Ph.D., Clark University, 1896. 



Fonger DeHaan, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish. 

Leeuwarden, Holland. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 1895 ; Instructor in 
Modern Languages, Lehigh University, 1885-91 ; Fellow in Romance Lan- 
guages, Johns Hopkins University, 1893-94 ; Assistant in Romance Lan- 
guages. Johns Hopkins University, 1893-95 ; Instructor in Romance 
Languages, Johns Hopkins University, 1895-96 ; Associate in Romance 
Languages, Johns Hopkins University, 1896-97. 

Albert Schinz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French Literature. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. A.B., University of Neuchatel, 1888, and A.M., 1889. 
Licentiate in Theology. 1892; Student. University of Berlin, 1892-93; 
University of Tubingen, 1S93 ; Ph.D.. University of Tubingen, 1894 ; Sor- 
bonne and College de Prance, 1894 ; Privatdocent, University of Neu- 
chatel, 1S96-97 ; Instructor in French, Clark University, 1897-98; Instruc- 
tor in French, University of Minnesota, 1898-99. 

Arthur Leslie Wheeler, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893 : Scholar and Student in Classics, Yale College, 
1893-96 ; Ph.D., Yale Universitv, 1S96 ; Instructor and Tutor in Latin, 
Yale College, 1894-1900. 

Henry Nevill Sanders, Ph.D., Professor of Greek. 

Edinburgh, Scotland. A.B., Trinity Universitv, Toronto, 1894. and A.M., 
1S97 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1903 ; Fellow in Greek. Johns 
Hopkins University, 1897-9S ; Lecturer in Greek, McGill University, 
1900-02. 

William Bashford Huff, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1889; A.M., University of Chicago. 1896; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Universitv, 1900 ; Lecture Assistant in Physics, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1899-1900, Assistant in Physics, 1900-01, 
and Instructor in Physics, 1901-02. 

William Roy Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

A.B., University of Texas, 1897. and A.M., 1898 : Ph.D., Columbia University, 
1903 ; Acting Professor of History and Political Science. University of 
Colorado, 1900-01 ; Lecturer in History, Barnard College, 1901-02. 

J. Edmund Wright, M.A., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Liverpool, England. Graduate in Honours (Senior Wrangler) in the Cam- 
bridge Mathematical Tripos. 1900, and First Division, First Class, Mathe- 
matical Tripos, Part II, 1901 ; Smith's Prizeman, 1902 ; Fellow of Trinity 
College, University of Cambridge, England. 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, A.B., Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1893 ; University of Oxford, England, and Univer- 
sity of Leipsic, 1893-94, Sorbonne and College de France, and University 
of Leipsic, 1894-95. 

Clarence Carroll Clark, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University. 1896 ; Ph.D., Yale University, 1903 ; Scholar 
in Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins University, 1S96-97 ; Instructor 
in Modern Languages. Toledo, Ohio, 1897-99 : Scholar in English, Yale 
University, 1901-02 ; Student in Oxford, Cambridge, and Berlin, 1902-03. 

Karl Detlev Jessen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German Litera- 
ture. 

Winnemark, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, A.B., University of Chicago, 
1896, and Fellow in German, 1897-98 ; Ph.D., University of Berlin, 1901 ; 
University of Chicago, 1895-98 ; University of Kiel, 1899 ; University of 
Berlin, 1898-99, 1899-1901 ; Acting Professor of Modern Languages, 
Eureka College, 1896 ; Instructor in German, Iowa State University, 
1897 ; Instructor in German, Harvard University, 1901-03, and Lecturer 
on German Literature and Aesthetics, 1904. 

Tenney Frank, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin. 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1898, and A.M., 1899 ; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 1903 ; Fellow. University of Chicago, 1899-1901 ; Assistant and 
Associate in Latin, University of Chicago, 1901-04. 



David Hilt Tennent, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology. 

S.B., Olivet College, 1900 ; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1902-04 ; 
Bruce Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1904 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1904. 

Nettie Maria Stevens, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Morphology. 

A.B., Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 1899, and A.M., 1900 ; Ph.D., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1903 ; Student in Hopkins Seaside Laboratory, Pacific 
Grove, Summer, 1897, 1898, 1899, and 1900 ; Graduate Scholar in Biology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1900-01 ; Holder of the President's European Fellow- 
ship, 1901-02 ; Student, Zoological Station, Naples, and University of 
Wiirzburg, 1901-02, 1908-09 ; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1902-03, and Research Fellow in Biology, 1903-04 ; Carnegie Research 
Assistant, 1904-05 ; Alice Freeman Palmer Research Fellow, 1908-09. 

Carleton Fairchild Brown, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 
Philology. 

A.B., Carleton College, 1888 ; A.M., Harvard University, 1901, and Ph.D. 

1903. Shattuck Scholar, Harvard University, 1901-03 ; Instructor in 
English, Harvard University, 1903-05. 

Caroline Louise Ransom, Ph.D., Associate Professor of the History 
of Art and Classical Archceology. 

A.B., Mt. Holvoke College, 1896; A.M., University of Chicago, 1900 and 
Ph.D., 1905 ; Fellow, University of Chicago, 1898-99, 1903-05 ; Student in 
Berlin, London, Paris, and Athens, 1900-03. 

James Barnes, Ph.D., Associate in Physics. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia. B.A., Dalhousie University, Honours in Mathematics 
and Physics, 1899, and M.A., 1900 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 

1904. Holder of 1851 Exhibition Science Research Scholarship, 1900-03 ; 
Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1903-04, and Assistant in Physics, 
1904-06. 

Richard Thayer Holbrook, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French 
Philology and Italian. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893 ; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1902. Sorbonna, 
College de France, Ecole des Chartes, 1893-94, 1895-96 ; Student In Italy 
and University of Berlin, 1894-95 ; Student in Spain, 1901 : Tutor in the 
Romance Languages and Literatures, Yale University, 1896-1901, and 
Columbia University, 1902-06. 

Theodore de Leo de Laguna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Phil- 
osophy. 

A.B., University of California, 1896, and A.M., 1899 ; Ph.D., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1901. Teacher in the Government Schools of the Philippine Islands, 
1901-04 ; Honorary Fellow and Assistant in Philosophy. Cornell University, 
1904-05 ; Assistant Professor of the Philosophy of Education, University 
of Michigan, 1905-07. 

Charles Clarence Williamson, Ph.D., Associate in Economics and 
Politics. 

A.B., Western Reserve University, 1904 ; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1907. 
Assistant in Economics and Graduate Student, Western Reserve Univer- 
sity. First Semester, 1904-05 ; Scholar in Political Economy, University 
of Wisconsin, 1904-05 ; Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin, 1905- 
06 ; University Fellow in Political Economy, Columbia University, 1906-07 ; 
Research Assistant of the Carnegie Institution, 1905-07. 

Hans Weyhe, Ph.D., Associate in Teutonic Philology and Sanskrit. 

Dessau, Germany. Ph.D., University of Leipsic, 1903 : University of Munich, 
1897; University of Leipsic, 1897 99; University of Berlin, 1899-1901. 

Marion Parris, Ph.D., Associate in Econmnics and Politics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901, and Ph.D., 1909. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1902-05. Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1905-06 ; Bryn 
Mawr College Research Fellow and Student in Economics and Politics, 
University of Vienna, 1906-07. 



William Henry Allison, Ph.D., Associate in History. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1893 ; B.D., Newton Theological Institution, 1902 ; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1905 ; Fellow in Church History, University 
of Chicago, 1902-04 ; Professor of Church History. Pacific Theological 
Seminary, 1904-05 : Professor of History and Political Science, Franklin 
College, 1905-08 ; Research Assistant of the Carnegie Institution, 1906-08. 

Fbedebick Hutton Getman, Ph.D., Associate in Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1903. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 
1893-96 ; University of Virginia, 1896-97 : Fellow in Chemistry, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1902-03. and Fellow bv Courtesv, 1903-04 ; Carnegie 
Research Assistant in Physical Chemistry, 1903-04 ; Lecturer in Physical 
Chemistry, College of the City of New York, 1904-05, and Lecturer in 
Physics, Columbia University, 1907-08. 

M. Phillips Mason, Ph.D., Associate in Philosophy. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1899. A.M., 1900, and Ph.D., 1904. Corpus 
Christi College, University of Oxford, 1899-1900 ; Universities of Heidel- 
berg and Berlin, 1900-01 ; University of Marburg, 1901-02 ; Sorbonne and 
College de France, 1902 ; Harvard University, 1902-04 ; Instructor in 
Philosophy, Princeton University, 1905-07. 

Claeence Ebeol Febbee, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Psychology. 

B.S., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1900, A.M., 1901. and M.S., 1902 ; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1909. Fellow in Psychology, Cornell University, 1902- 
03 ; Assistant in Psychology, Cornell University, 1903-07. 

Marion Reilly, A.B., Dean of the College and Reader in Philosophy. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1901-02, 1903, 1903-06 ; Newnham College, University of Cambridge, 
Spring, 1907. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., TV on-Resident Lecturw in English 
Diction. 

Tynemouth, England. M.A.. University of London, 1900. Special Lecturer 
in Elocution, Johns Hopkins University, 1901 ; Special Lecturer in Elocu- 
tion, University of California, 1902. 

Orie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., Lecturer in Elizabethan Literature. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1888. Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1903. Graduate 
Student, University of Chicago, 1901-03, and Fellow in English, 1903-04. 

Chester Albert Reeds, M.S., Lecturer in Geology. 

B.S., University of Oklahoma, 1905 ; M.S., Tale University, 1907 ; Graduate 
Scholar. Yale University, 1905-06 ; and Fellow, 1906-08. Field Assistant, 
U. S. Geological Survey. 1903-06 ; Instructor in Mineralogy and Petrology, 
University of Oklahoma, February to June, 1908. 

Fbedebick: A. Blossom, Lecturer in French. 

A.B., Amherst College, 1898 ; Johns Hopkins University, 1903-04, 1909. 
Student of Romance Languages in Paris and Grenoble, 1905-08. 

Rose Chambeblin, M.A., Reader in German. 

Great Yarmouth, England. M.A., Trinity College, Dublin, 1905 ; Graduate in 
Honours, Newnham College, University of Cambridge, England, 1886 
(Mediaeval and Modern Languages Tripos, First Class). 

Habbiet Randolph, Ph.D., Demonstrator in Biology and Reader in 
Botany. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College. 1889 ; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1889-90 ; University of Ziirich, 1890-92 ; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1892. 

Katharine Fullebton, A.M., Reader in English. 

A.B., Radcliffe College, 1900, and A.M., 1901. 

Regina Kathabine Ceandall, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Smith College, 1890 ; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1902. Graduate 
Student, University of Chicago, 1S93-94, and Fellow in History, 1894-96 ; 
Assistant in History, Smith College, 1896-99 ; Instructor in History, 
Wellesley College, 1899-1900. 



Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M.. 1897: Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1896-97, and Fellow in English, 1897-98. College de France, 
First Semester, 1898-99. 

Abby Kirk, A.B., Reader in Elementary Greek. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1892. Reader in English, Bryn Mawr College, 
1892-98. 

Maud Downing, A.B., Reader in Semitic Languages. 

A.B., University of Toronto, 1902. Graduate Student, University of Toronto, 
1902-03 : Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-07 ; Honorary Fellow 
in Semitic Languages, Johns Hopkins University, 1908-09. 

Clara Leonora Nicola y, Ph.D., Reader in Elementary French. 

Berlin, Germany. L.L.A., St. Andrew's University, 1900 ; A.M., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1901, and Ph.D., 1907. University College, Nottingham, 
England, 1892-97; Student in France and Germany, 1903. 

Virginia Ragsdale, Ph.D., Reader in Mathematics. 

S.B., Guilford College, 1892. Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1892-93, and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1893-97, 
1907-08. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1S96, and Ph.D., 1906. Holder of 
the Bryn Mawr Euronean Fellowship, and Assistant Demonstrator In 
Physics", Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97 ; Student, University of Gottingen, 
1897-98 : Holder of Fellowship of the Baltimore Association for the Pro- 
motion of the University Education of Women, Graduate Scholar, and 
Fellow hy Courtesy in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02, and 
Fellow in Mathematics, 1902-03. 

Lillie Deming Loshe, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1899 ; A.M., Columbia University, 1903, and 
Ph.D., 1908. Graduate Student, Barnard College. 1899-1900 ; Columbia 
University, 1901-04, First Semester, 1904-05, and 1905-07. 

Content Shepard Nichols, A.M., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1899, and A.M., 1900. Graduate Scholar in Latin 
and English. Bryn Mawr College, 1899-1900 ; Assistant Reader in English, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1900. 

Elizabeth Andros Foster, A.M., Reader in Latin. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908, and A.M., 1909. Graduate Scholar in Latin, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Frances Lowater, B.Sc, Ph.D., Demonstrator in Physics. 

Nottingham, England, B.Sc, University of London, 1900 ; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1906: University College, Nottingham, 1888-91. 1892-93; Newn- 
ham College, University of Cambridge, England. 1891-92 ; Fellow in Phvsics, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97, and Graduate Scholar in Physics, 1897-98; 
Secretary of Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99. 

Gertrude Langden Heritage. A.M., Demonstrator in Chemistry. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1899. Graduate Student in 
Chemistry. Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97, 1898-1900, and Graduate Student 
in Mathematics and Chemistry, 1897-98. 

Caroline Vinia Lynch, A.M., Demonstrator in the History of Art 
and Classical Archeology. 

A.B., Smith College. 1894. and A.M., Columbia University, 1908. American 
School of Classical Studies in Rome, 1904-05 ; Columbia University, 
1906-07; Radcliffe College, 1907-09. 

Anna Bell Lawther, A.B., Secretary of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1897. Assistant Bursar, Bryn Mawr College, 
1898-1900 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99, 1904-05 ; War- 
den of Merion Hall, 1904, 1904-05. 

Ethel Walker, A.M., Recording Secretary and Appointment Secre- 
tary. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1894, and A.M., 1904. Graduate Scholar in 

Archaeology, Bryn Mawr College, 1902-04 ; Recording Secretary, 1904-06, 

and Appointment Secretary. 1905-07. 



10 

Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S., Librarian. 

B.L., University of Nebraska, 1885 ; B.L.S., New York State Library School, 
1902. Acting Librarian and Adjunct Professor of Bibliography, University 
of Nebraska, 1892-97 ; Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library 
Economy, University of Illinois, 1897 ; Classifier, Iowa State University, 
1898 ; Second Assistant Librarian, Los Angeles Public Library, 189S-99, 
and Librarian, 1900-05. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

Licentiate, British College of Physical Education, 1898, and Member, 1899. 
Gymnasium Mistresss. Girls' Grammar School, Bradford, Yorkshire, 1899- 
1900 ; in the Arnold Poster High School, Burnley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901 ; 
in the High School, Halifax, Yorkshire, 1900-01 ; Head of Private Gym- 
nasium, Ilkley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901 ; Harvard School of Physical Training, 
Summer, 1901 ; Hockey Coach, Vassar College, Wellesley College, Radcliffe 
College, Mt. Holyoke College, Smith College, Bryn Mlawr College, Boston 
Normal School of Gymnastics, 1901-04 ; Hockey Coach, Harvard Summer 
School of Gymnastics, 1906. , 

Elizabeth Lawrence Gray, Assistant Director of Athletics and Gym- 
nastics. 

Graduate, Sargent Normal School of Physical Education, Boston, Mass., 1908. 
Student. Gilbert Summer Normal School of Classic Dancing, 1908 ; In- 
structor in Gymnastics, Playgrounds, Cambridge, Mass., Summer, 1908, 
1909. 

Mary Ellen Baker, A.B., B.L.S., Head Cataloguer. 

A.B., Lincoln University, 1900. B.L.S., New York State Library School, 
1908. Assistant in Latin. Missouri Valley College, 1901-05, and Librarian, 
1902-06. Illinois State Library School, 1906-07 ; New York State Library 
School, 1907-08. 

Bessie Homer Jennings, Assistant Cataloguer. 
Graduate, Drexel Institute Library School, 1900. 

Mary Warren Taylor, Secretary to the Director of Athletics and 
Gymnastics. 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D., Attending Physician of the College. 
Anne Heath Thomas, A.M., M.D., Visiting Physician of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1897, and A.M., 1898. M.D., Woman's Medical 
College of Pennsylvania, 1905. Graduate Scholar in Physics and Biology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1897-98 ; Teacher of Chemistry in the State Normal 
School. Trenton, N. J., 1898-1902 ; Student. Woman's Medical College of 
Pennsylvania, 1902-05 ; Interne, Woman's Hospital of Philadelphia, 1905- 
06 ; Resident at the Evening Dispensary for Working Women and Girls, 
Baltimore, Md.. and Graduate Student in Medicine. Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1906-07 : Physician, Registrar and Assistant in Clinic in the Wo- 
man's Hospital. Philadelphia, and Assistant in Clinic in the Hospital of the 
Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1907-08 ; Instructor in Thera- 
peutics and Physical Diagnosis, Woman's Medical College, and Assistant 
Visiting Physician, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Helen Murphy, M.D., Examining Oculist. 

The following physicians have consented to serve as consultants 
in special cases: 

Ella B. Everitt. M.D., Consultant Gynecologist. 

John H. Musser, M.D., Consultant Physician. 

George de Schweinitz, M.D., Consultant Oculist. 

Robert G. Le Conte, M.D., Consultant Surgeon. 

Francis R. Packard, M.D., Consultant Aurist. 

James K. Young, M.D., Consultant Orthopaedist. 



Report of the Assistant to the President. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to submit to you a statistical report on 
the students of Bryn Mawr College for the academic year 
1908-09, and also an account of the regulations of the Direc- 
tors and Faculty which were administered through my office. 

The entire number of students enrolled during the year 
was 420. There were 86 graduate students, including fellows. 
The number of graduates was over 20 per cent of the whole 
number of students. 

I. Comparative Table of Number of Graduate and Under- 
graduate Students from 1885 to 1909. 

Graduate Undergraduate Total 

Year. Students. Students. Number. 

1885-86 8 36 44 

1886-87 10 54 64 

1887-88 8 70 78 

1888-89 16 100 116 

1889-90 22 100 122 

1890-91 12 120 132 

1891-92 27 142 169 

1892-93 34 168 202 

1893-94 43 200 243 

1894-95 49 234 283 

1895-96 52 246 298 

1896-97 . 46 243 289 

1897-98 49 275 324 

1898-99 67 287 354 

1899-1900 53 334 387 

1900-01 48 348 396 

1901-02 53 383 436 

1902-03 70 377 447 

1903-04 62 384 446 

1904-05 63 378 441 

1905-06 79 377 456 

1906-07 75 362 437 

1907-08 72 348 420 

1908-09 86 334 420 

: (id 



12 
Statistics of Graduate Students. 

II. Geographical Distribution of Graduate Students. 

'The eighty-six graduate students enrolled during the 
year came from the following states and countries : 

Students. Percentage. 

Pennsylvania 38 44.18 

New Jersey 5 5.81 

Indiana 4 4.65 

New York 4 4.65 

California _ 3 3.48 

Connecticut 3 3.48 

Massachusetts 3 3.48 

Ohio 3 3.48 

Michigan 2 2.32 

North Carolina 2 2.32 

Alabama 1 1.16 

Illinois 1 1.16 

Iowa . 1 1.16 

Minnesota 1 1.16 

Mississippi 1 1.16 

Missouri 1 1.16 

New Hampshire 1 1.16 

Oklahoma 1 1.16 

Tennessee 1 1.16 

Texas 1 1.16 

Wisconsin 1 1.16 

Canada 3 3.48 

England 4 4.65 

Japan 1 1-16 

Total 86 

These eighty-six graduate students may be classified as 
follows : 



13 

JSTon-resident, holding European Fellowships and studying 

abroad 4 

Resident fellows 12 

Resident fellow by courtesy and graduate scholar 1 

Graduate scholars 20 

Members of college staff 10 

Graduate students 39 

86 
Fifty-one were resident and thirty-five non-resident. 

III. Number of Years of Graduate Study. 

37 in their first year of graduate study. 

18 in their second year of graduate study. 

15 in their third year of graduate study. 

5 in their fourth year of graduate study. 

4 in their fifth year of graduate study. 

2 in their sixth year of graduate study. 

4 in their seventh year of graduate study. 

1 in her eighth year of graduate study. 

86 

IV. Studies Elected by 82 Graduate Students in Residence. 

Under each subject all the graduate students electing 
work in that subject are included. 

Students. Percentage. 

English 21 25.61 

Art and Archaeology 12 14.63 

Latin 11 13.41 

History 11 13.41 

Philosophy and Psychology. . .11 13.41 

Greek 9 10.98 

French 9 10.98 

Semitic Languages 6 7.32 

Mathematics 6 7.32 

Spanish 5 6.10 



14 

Students. Percentage. 

Chemistry 5 6.10 

German and Teutonic Phil- 
ology 4 4.88 

Economics and Politics 4 4.88 

Physics 4 4.88 

Geology 4 4.88 

Biology : 4 4.88 

Biblical Literature 2 2.44 

Italian 1 1.22 

Statistics of Undergraduate Students. 

V. Geographical Distribution of Undergraduate Students. 

The 334 undergraduate students enrolled during the 
past year came from the following states and countries : 

Students. Percentage. 

Pennsylvania 114 34.10 

lew York 54 16.16 

Illinois 35 10.47 

Maryland 23 6.88 

Massachusetts 14 4.18 

ISTew Jersey 10 2.99 

Ohio 9 2.69 

District of Columbia 6 1.79 

Virginia 6 1.79 

Nebraska 5 1.49 

Indiana 4 1.19 

Ehode Island 4 1.19 

Arkansas 3 .89 

Connecticut 3 .89 

Iowa 3 .89 

Minnesota 3 .89 

Texas 3 .89 

Wisconsin 3 .89 

California 2 .59 

Colorado 2 .59 



15 

Students. Percentage. 

Kentucky 2 .59 

Louisiana 2 .59 

Missouri 2 .59 

New Hampshire 2 .59 

Oregon 2 .59 

Delaware 1 .29 

Florida 1 .29 

Georgia 1 .29 

Kansas 1 .29 

Maine 1 .29 

Michigan 1 .29 

Mississippi 1 .29 

Montana 1 .29 

Nevada 1 .29 

North Carolina 1 .29 

Tennessee 1 .29 

Wyoming 1 .29 

Hawaii 1 .29 

England 2 .59 

France 1 .29 

Japan 1 .29 

Turkey 1 .29 

Total 334 

These 334 undergraduates are classified as follows: 305 
resident, 29 non-resident; 327 candidates for a degree, 7 
hearers. 

Of the 327 candidates for a degree 80 were Seniors and 
2 of these completed the work for the degree in February and 
1 in March, 10 deferred graduation, and 70 graduated; 73 
were Juniors, 77 Sophomores, and 97 Freshmen. 

In addition to those who graduated 37 undergraduates 
left during the year, or at its close, for the following reasons : 

Needed at home 7 

On account of illness 6 



16 

lSTot stated, probably low grades 5 

Withdrawn for a semester 3 

To study music 3 

For financial reasons 2 

For financial reasons and on account of 

illness 2 

For financial reasons and needed at home. . 2 

To be married 2 

To attend another college nearer home. ... 1 

Homesickness 1 

Married 1 

Withdrawn for one year 1 

Not stated 1 

Total '. .37 

The students who left were members of the following 
classes: Seniors, 3; Juniors, 11; Sophomores, 15; Fresh- 
men, 8. 

VI. Denominational Affiliations of Graduate and Under- 
graduate Students. 

Affiliations. Graduate. Undergraduate. Total. 

Episcopalian 26 117 143 

Presbyterian 16 85 101 

Congregational 10 17 27 

Unitarian 4 18 22 

Baptist 5 14 19 

None 4 14 18 

Friends 5 11 16 

Methodist Episcopal 4 12 16 

Jewish 13 13 

Roman Catholic 1 10 11 

Lutheran 3 5 8 

Christian Science 5 5 

TTniversalist 1 4 5 

Dutch Reformed 4 4 

German Reformed 1 1 2 



17 



Affiliations. Graduate. 

Not stated 2 

Reformed Episcopalian . . 1 

Reformed Jewish 

Disciples of Christ 1 

Ethical Culture .... 

Moravian 1 

Protestant Reformed .... 1 

86 



Undergraduate. 


Total 





2 


1 


2 


2 


2 





1 


1 


1 





1 





1 



334 



420 



Statistics of Senior Class. 

At Commencement, June, 1909, the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts was conferred on 70 students, two of whom completed 
the requirements in February, 1909, and one in March, 1909. 
Their courses may be analysed as follows : 

VII. Length of Course of Senior Class. 



Number of 
Students. 


Years Spent 
on Course. 


Entered. 


Semesters absent 
from College. 


59 


4 


October, 1905 


None 


1 


3 


October, 1906 


None 


2 


±y 2 


February, 1905 


ISTone 


2 


4 


October, 1904 


2 


1* 


4 


October, 1904 


1 


1 


4l/ 2 


October, 1904 


1 


1* 


4y 2 


October, 1904 


None 


1 


6 


October, 1903 


None 


1 


4 


October, 1901 


8 


1* 


4i/ 2 


October, 1899 


10 



70 



104 students entered the college as Freshmen in October, 
1905. Of these 59, or 56.7 per cent, graduated after the 
regular four year course. 

* These students completed the work for the degree in February or March. 



18 



The average age of the class graduating in June was 
22 years and 8 months. 

The median age of the class graduating in June was 
22 years and 6 months. 

The average age of the class graduating in February and 
March was 25 years and 3 months. 

The median age of the class graduating in February and 
March was 23 years and 11 months. 



VIII. Groups Elected by the Senior Class. 



History and Economics 

and Politics 17 

Latin and English 9 

Latin and German 6 

Latin and French 5 

Mathematics and Physics 4 

Greek and Latin 3 

Greek and Philosophy ... 3 

Latin and Mathematics . . 3 

English and French .... 3 

Chemistry and Biology. . 3 

Greek and English 2 

English and German ... 2 



English, Italian, and 

Spanish 2 

German and Spanish. ... 2 
Economics and Politics 

and Philosophy 2 

Greek and French 1 

Greek and Mathematics.. 1 
German and French .... 1 
Mathematics and Chem- 
istry 1 

70 



Arranged in order the major subjects chosen are as fol- 



lows 

Latin 

Economics and Politics. . 19 

English 18 

History 17 

German 11 

Greek 10 

French 10 

Mathematics 9 



26 Philosophy 5 

Physics 4 

Chemistry 4 

Biology 3 

Italian and Spanish .... 2 

Spanish 2 



140 



19 

Statistics of the Freshman Class. 

The Freshman class numbered 94, 92 entering in Octo- 
ber and 2 in February. Ninety were resident and four non- 
resident. 

IX. Table of Conditions of Freshman Class. 

Entering in Entering in 
October. February. 

Clear 36 

Clear except punctuation or spelling. 23 

Conditioned in 1 section 10 

Conditioned in 2 sections 2 

Conditioned in 3 sections 7 

Conditioned in 4 sections 6 1 

Conditioned in 5 sections 3 

Honorable dismissal from other col- 
leges 5 1 

Total 92 2 

Freshmen entering the college on examination and with- 
out conditions, 40.45 per cent ; entering on examination and 
with conditions in punctuation or spelling, 25.84 per cent; 
entering on examination with no conditions except in punc- 
tuation or spelling, 66.29 per cent; Freshmen conditioned in 
spelling, 10 ; conditioned in punctuation, 35. 

X. Comparative Table of Percentage of Freshmen Entering 

Without Matriculation Conditions, October, 

1890— October, 1908. 

This table includes only those entering in October of 
each year and takes no account of conditions in punctuation 
and spelling. Up to 1897 the proportion of students enter- 
ing free from conditions to all the entering students, includ- 
ing honorable dismissal students, was taken. After 1897 the 
students who entered on honorable dismissal were not counted 
in taking the percentage. It is therefore misleading to com- 
pare the two sets of percentages. 



20 

In 1890 25.0% In 1900 38.78% 

In 1891 22.8% In 1901 40.52% 

In 1892 32.0% In 1902 37.97% 

In 1893 23.1% In 1903 35.29% 

In 1894 19.3% In 1904 50.00% 

In 1895 19.0%) In 1905 54.81% 

In 1896 21.8% In 1906 53.48% 

In 1897 31.8% In 1907 56.48% 

In 1898 26.9% In 1908 66.29% 

In 1899 31.73% 



XI. Table of Preparatory Schools that Prepared 
92 Freshmen. 

(Arranged according to sections of country in which the 
college offers matriculation scholarships. Five Freshmen 
entered by honorable dismissal from other colleges.) 

New England States: 

Miss Brown's Classical School for Girls, Boston, 

Mass 1 

Bnrnham School, jSTorthampton, Mass 1 

Dana Hall, Wellesley, Mass. 1 

The High School, 'New Haven, Conn 1 

Nichols Academy, Dudley, Mass 1 

Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn 1 

Waynflete School, Portland, Me 1 

Wykeham' Rise School, Washington, Conn 1 

8 

First Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of Rose- 
mary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 

Second Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the 
Waynflete School, Portland, Me. 



21 

New York, Neiv Jersey, and Delaware: 

Brearley School, New York City 3 

The Balliol School, Utica, N. Y 2 

The Veltin School, New York City 2 

Miss Beard's School, Orange, 1ST. J 1 

Chappaqua Mountain Institute, Chappaqua, 1ST. Y. . 1 

The Finch School, New York City 1 

Friends' Seminary, New York City 1 

The High School, East Orange, N. J 1 

Mrs. Merrill's School, New Bochelle, N. Y 1 

Packer Collegiate Institute, Brooklyn, New York 

City 1 

St. Mary's School, New York City 1 

15 

First Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of Miss 
Beard's School, Orange, N. J. 

Second Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the 
Balliol School, Utica, N. Y. 

Western States: 

The University High School, Chicago, 111 2 

The University School for Girls, Chicago, 111 2 

The High School, West Des Moines, la . . 2 

Bartholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati, 1 

Brownell Hall, Omaha, Neb 1 

The Central High School, Minneapolis, Minn 1 

The High School, Decatur, 111 ' 1 

The High School, Martins Ferry, 1 

Kenwood Institute, Chicago, 111 1 

The Lake View High School, Chicago, 111 1 

Manual Training High School, Indianapolis, Ind. . 1 

Portland Academy, Portland, Ore 1 

Shortridge High School, Indianapolis, Ind 1 

16 



22 

First Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the Bar- 
tholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati, O. 

Second Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the 
University School for Girls, Chicago, 111. 

Pennsylvania and Southern States: 

The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Penna 12 

The Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md 7 

The Girls' High School, Philadelphia 6 

Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh, Penna 4 

The Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Penna 3 

The Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Penna ... 3 

The Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia 2 

Miss Ellett's School, Richmond, Va 2 

Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Penna. ....... 2 

Elizabeth College, Charlotte, K C. 1 

Friends' Central School, Philadelphia 1 

Girls' High School, Reading, Penna 1 

Miss Gordon's School, Philadelphia 1 

Miss Hills's School, Philadelphia 1 

The Holton-Arms School, Washington, D. C 1 

The High School, Johnstown, Penna 1 

Metzger College, Carlisle, Penna 1 

The Stevens School, Germantown, Philadelphia ... 1 

St. Timothy's School, Catonsville, Md 1 

Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Penna 1 

Wissahickon Heights School, Chestnut Hill, Phila- 
delphia 1 

Villa Dupont, Paris 1 

54 

First and Second Matriculation Scholarships won by 
pupils of the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

Private tuition 2 

Honorable dismissal from other colleges 5 



100 



23 

In the above list duplicates are included, some students 
having received their preparation at two or more schools, and 
also by private tuition. 

XII. Preparation Received in Private or Public Schools. 

Entered in In 

October. February. 

Private Schools 54 

Private Schools and Private Tuition. 11 

Private Tuition 2 

Public Schools 12 

Private and Public Schools .. 3 

Public Schools and Private Tuition. 3 
Public Schools, Private Schools and 

Private Tuition 2 

Honorable Dismissal 5 

92 2 

Percentage of Freshmen entering by examination in 
October who have received preparation for college only in 
private schools or by private tuition equals 77 per cent ; the 
percentage of those who studied only in public schools was 
13.8. 

XIII. Geographical Distribution of Freshman Class. 

Number. Percentage. 

Pennsylvania 26 27.7 

New York 15 16.0 

Illinois 14 14.9 

Maryland 9 9.6 

Onio 3 3.2 

Virginia 3 3.2 

Connecticut 2 2.2 

Iowa 2 2.2 

Minnesota 2 2.2 

Arkansas 1 1.1 

Colorado 1 1.1 



24 

Number. Percentage. 

District of Columbia 1 1.1 

Indiana 1 1.1 

Kansas 1 1.1 

Kentucky 1 1.1 

Louisiana 1 1.1 

Maine 1 1.1 

Massachusetts 1 1.1 

Missouri 1 1.1 

Nebraska ". 1 1.1 

New Jersey 1 1.1 

Oregon 1 1.1 

Texas 1 1.1 

England 1 1.1 

France 1 1.1 

Japan 1 1.1 

94 

In all 22 states and the District of Columbia, England, 
France, and Japan are represented. 

XIV. Denominational Affiliations of the Freshman Class. 

Episcopalian 28 Eriends 2 

Presbyterian 26 Unitarian 2 

Jewish 7 Lutheran 1 

Congregational 6 Ethical Culture 1 

Roman Catholic 5 ]STo denominational affilia- 

Baptist 4 tion 3 

Methodist 4 — 

Christian Science 3 94 

Dutch Reformed 2 

XV. Average and Median Age of the Freshman Class. 

Years. Months. 

Average age of class entering in October 18 7 

Median age of class entering in October 18 5 

Average age of class entering in Eebruary 20 3 



25 

Years. Months. 

Median age of class entering in February 20 3 

Average age (excluding honorable dismissal stu- 
dents) 18 6 

Median age (excluding honorable dismissal stu- 
dents) 18 4 

XVI. Occupations of Parents of Freshman Class. 

Professions. 

Lawyers (1 Judge) 15 

Physicians 8 

Teachers (3 Professors) 6 

Clergymen 3 

Officers in the Army 1 

Technical Engineers 1 

Dentist 1 

— 41 

Business. 

Merchants (retail 3, wholesale 6, retired 2, not 

specified 4) 13 

Manufacturers 10 

Business Officers and Employees 11 

Bankers 8 

Insurance 3 

Brokers 3 

Publishers 2 

Eeal Estate 2 

Farmer 1 

— 53 

Total 94 

Action of the Merit Law. 

In June, 1908, six students were on probation. Of 
these four did not return to college and of the two who 



26 

remained one was in her second year of probation and grad- 
uated in June, 1909, the other was in her first year of pro- 
bation, and expects to graduate in 1910. 

In February, 1909, a member of the class of 1909 came 
under the action of the five-year rule, having a grade below 
merit in 56 hours and a grade of merit or over in 51 of the 
hours she had been examined on. 

In June, 1909, four students of the class of 1910 came 
under the action of the five-year rule and were placed on 
probation. Two of these were not planning to take a degree 
and left college. The remaining two will endeavor to grad- 
uate in 1911. Hence four remain on probation, two in the 
class of 1910 and two in the class of 1911. 

Since the rule came into action for the class of 1907 
twenty-five students have been placed on probation ; of these 
five have graduated, three have been excluded from the de- 
gree, thirteen have left college and four remain on probation. 

Registration of Attendance on the First Day of Each 
Semester and Before and After Vacations. 

Students are required to register eight times in the col- 
lege year, as shown by the following table, in order to insure 
regular attendance before and after the vacations. Cases of 
failure to register are investigated by the office and reported 
to the Petition Committee. 

XVIII. Table of Cases of Failure to Register. 

Failed to register For 
on account of other 

illness. reasons. 

Beginning of the college year 4 4 

Before the Thanksgiving vacation . . 4 3 

After the Thanksgiving vacation ... 4 6 

Before the Christmas vacation .... 1 1 

After the Christmas vacation 6 3 

Beginning of the second semester . . 4 1 

Before the Easter vacation 9 2 

After the Easter vacation 10 2 

Total 42 22 

Respectfully submitted, 

Isabel Maddison, 

Assistant to the President. 



27 



Report of the Dean of the College. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to present the following report for the 
academic year 1908-09. The office of the Dean of the College 
has now been in existence two years and the work of the past 
year has been more systematised than in the previous year 
and its scope more definitely defined. The work has been 
chiefly advisory in character and the students have come for 
consultation upon all matters pertaining to their college life. 
The registration of illness and attendance at lectures has been 
kept as usual from the records sent in weekly by the wardens 
of the halls and the members of the faculty. 

Registration of Illness. 
First semester: 

Number of undergraduate students included in report, 

325. 
Number reporting illness, 106, or 32.6 per cent of 
whole. 

Second semester: 

Number of undergraduate students included in report, 

324. 
Number reporting illness, 122, or 37.3 per cent of 

whole. 

The details of illnesses are given in the doctors' reports 
for the year. Although the actual number of illnesses has 
not been appreciably decreased the attendance of Dr. Everitt 
or Dr. Thomas at the college daily, except Sunday, has 
decreased the severity of the illnesses reported. 

Registration of Attendance at Lectures. 

First semester: The registration of attendance for the 
first semester included 325 undergraduate students. The 



28 

total number of cuts for the whole semester averaged 10.89 
hours per student; the total number of unexcused cuts aver- 
aged 8.22 hours per student. 

Second semester : The registration of attendance for the 
second semester included 324 undergraduate students. The 
average of the total number of cuts for the whole semester 
was 12.29 hours per student, and of the unexcused cuts 7.64. 
These figures show a marked decrease in the average number 
of cuts from the second semester of 1907-08. There were, 
I think, fewer students in college in 1908-09 who cut exces- 
sively. 

In addition to the regular college work of the office I 
have endeavored to keep in touch with the schools preparing 
students for the college. I visited a number of schools during 
the year and spoke before Miss Gleim's School in Pittsburgh 
and the Misses Shipley's School in Bryn Mawr. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Reilly, 

Dean of the College. 



29 



Report of the Appointment Secretary. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to submit the following report on the 
work of the Bureau of Appointments during the year 
1908-09: 

The following positions have been secured through the 
Appointment Bureau for the year 1909-10 : 

Teachers in private schools 18 

Substitute teachers in private schools 3 

Executive positions in private schools 1 

Teachers in public schools 1 

Tutors and temporary positions 8 

Secretary of Consumers' League 1 

Total number of positions secured 32 

The above positions have been secured by members of 
the following classes : 

Class of 1909 13 

Class of 1908 6 

Class of 1907 .. 1 

Class of 1906 1 

Class of 1905 1 

Class of 1904 3 

Class of 1903 1 

Class of 1895 1 

Graduate Student 1 

Former students who did not take degrees. ... 2 

Undergraduate students still in college 2 

Total 32 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ethel M. Walkee. 
Appointment Secretary. 



30 



Repoi't of the Head Librarian. 
To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to present the annual report of the 
work of the library for the year ending September 30, 1909. 

The following table shows the additions made from vari- 
ous sources, and the total present extent of the library, with 
a statement of the condition of a year ago for purposes of 
comparison : 

Accessions. 

Number of volumes October 1, 1908 55,328 

Number of volumes October 1, 1907 ... . 52,859 
Number of volumes added : 

1908-09 1907-08 

By purchase 1,940 1,711 

By binding 585 438 

By gift and exchange 641 366 

By replacement 19 3 

Christian Union 36 16 

Reaccessioned 7 .... 

Unknown sources 32 6 

Total gain 3,260 2,540 

Volumes withdrawn 56 76 



Net gain 3,204 2,464 



Maps 155 

Pamphlets added 539* 

Pamphlets withdrawn 90 

Net gain 449 

* These numbers represent catalogued pamphlets only. There is also in the 
library a growing collection of several thousand pamphlets arranged alphabetically 
by author. Pamphlets when bound are withdrawn and again accessioned as books. 



31 

Total volumes September 30, 1009 58,548 

Total pamphlets 1,891* 

Total maps 1,881 



These accessions are distributed by classes as follows : 

1908-09. 1907-08. 

General works 571 274 

Philosophy 173 139 

Religion ' 140 153 

Social Science 505 450 

Philology 125 157 

Science 305 369 

Useful Arts 33 36 

Fine Arts 36 20 

Literature 1,023 513 

History, etc 349 425 

Not classed 4 

Total 3,260 2,540 

A list of donors to the library with titles of the books and 
pamphlets presented is appended. This list does not include 
books purchased from the gifts of money mentioned later 
under the financial statement. ]STor are these included in 
the table of accessions under the head of Gifts and Exchanges 
since the actual buying of the books took place in the library. 
Of the gifts of books for the year the most notable has been 
a collection from Mr. Ingham which included several valu- 
able books in philosophy and economics. The University of 
Pennsylvania completed the file of publications already in the 
library. The Hon. Irving P. Wanger, Member of Congress 
from this district, has responded repeatedly to special requests, 
and many public documents have been received directly from 
the Superintendent of Documents. 

Gifts of money were received to the amount of $2,299.92. 
This has been spent with the exception of less than half the 
fund for books in German literature and philology, given by 

*See footnote, page 30. 



32 

Mrs. Woerishoffer in memory of Mrs. Anna Ottendorfer, and 
the fund given by the Class of 1893 in memory of Madeline 
Vaughan Abbott Bushnell. 

Miss Garrett's gifts for the year have been devoted to 
books in English literature of the Elizabethan period selected 
by Dr. Hatcher; books on administration for the president's 
office ; the British Museum Catalogue of Printed Books with 
the Supplement, ninety-two volumes in all, and books in 
early English and catalogues of manuscripts selected by Pro- 
fessor Brown. To this last subject were devoted the gifts of 
Dean Reilly and Mr. Rosengarten, going far toward com- 
pleting the file of these important catalogues. 

The gift of the Class of 1893 is in the hands of Professor 
Donnelly, who selected books on English literature of the 
sixteenth and seventeenth centuries while in England during 
last year. These books have not yet arrived. 

The fund given by Miss Helen Lee Stevens for the pur- 
chase of books for the Latin Seminary was not spent in 
1907-08. Prom the accumulated amount was purchased a 
valuable phototype reproduction of the Plautus Codex at 
Heidelberg. 

Cataloguing. 

1908-09. 1907-08. 

Titles catalogued 2,677 2,458 

Cards written 9,305 7,792 

Seminary cards 343 67 

Continuations added 1,511 1,594 

The accessions for the year have been catalogued to date 
promptly. The recataloguing has progressed somewhat 
irregularly. It has been the plan from the first to recatalogue 
such subjects as are being done in the Library of Congress, 
thus making use of as large a number as possible of the printed 
cards. The following classes have been completed during the 
year: 000, 039, 070, 099, 510, 539, 571, 573, 600, 629, 
640, 699, 760, 799. In addition several long sets and con- 
tinuations in other classes have been recatalogued as the 
printed cards were obtainable. 



33 

The work accomplished in this department has been 
most satisfactory. An increased amount of work with a 
smaller cataloguing force indicates growing effectiveness on 
the part of the general staff. The cataloguing force com- 
prises the head cataloguer, the assistant cataloguer, and a stu- 
dent assistant who works two hours a day during the college 
year. But the entire library staff really contribute to the 
work of preparing books for the shelves, from the pasting to 
the labeling, and filing of the cards. W.e have been particu- 
larly fortunate in retaining in the library the young women 
whose main work is the care of the loan desk and the reserve 
book room. In addition to their regular duties they both 
assist in the cataloguing by copying cards, transcribing call 
numbers to the backs of cards, and filing cards, thus con- 
tributing to the permanent records of the library. 

Circulation. 

1908-09. 1907-08. 

October 3,688 3,387 

November 2,238 2,087 

December 1,873 1,533 

January 1,995 1,741 

February 2,232 2,453 

March 2,212 2,219 

April 1,862 1,699 

May 1,486 1,481 



Total 17,586 16,600 

A gratifying increase in the books taken from the main 
stack room is indicated in the above statement. ISTo figures 
are kept of Beading Room use of books, nor of use in depart- 
mental or seminary libraries. There is no falling off in the 
Reading Room use of books. The increase may be at the 
expense of the halls. Students prefer to do their work in 
the Reading Room rather than in their own rooms, which 
means that the reserved book room collection is drawn upon in 
preference to the hall libraries. It is impossible to state to 
what extent this takes place, as no statistics are kept. 



34 

During the first semester students were permitted to 
reserve desks for their own use, a privilege which did not 
work out practically. After the mid-year examinations 
reserves were allowed for limited periods only during the 
preparation of papers. This modification has proved more 
satisfactory. 

Financial Statement. 

The sums available for the purchase of books, periodicals, 
binding, and general supplies during the past year have been 
as follows : 

Library appropriation $3,000.00 

Apportioned as follows : 

Biology 150.00 

Chemistry 150.00 

English 150.00 

French 150.00 

Geology 110.00 

German 150.00 

Greek 150.00 

History 150.00 

Italian 75.00 

Latin 150.00 

Mathematics 150.00 

Philosophy 150.00 

Physics 150.00 

Political Science 150.00 

Reference books 50.00 

Religious books 25.00 

Spanish 75.00 

General literature 75.00 

Library expenses 790.00 

$3,000.00 
Condition Examination Fund : 

Undivided balance $207.02 

Condition examination fees 1,412.10 

Non-registration fines 35.00 

Course book changes 86.00 

$1,740.12 



35 

This was apportioned as follows : 
Regular. 

Art $100.00 

Botany 25.00 

Education 25.00 

Psychology 100.00 

International catalogue 83.45 

Special. 

Biology 100.00 

Semitics 500.00 

French (Professor Foulet) 50.00 

French (Professor Schinz) 50.00 

English (Professor Brown) 100.00 

Greek (Professor Wright) 50.00 

Latin (Professor Frank) 100.00 

Economics 100.00 

Overdrafts 300.00 

Balance undivided 56.67 



$1,740.12 



The overdraft allowance met debts which had accumu- 
lated for years in various departments and was apportioned 
as follows : 

Art $97.78 

Biology 20.56 

English (Professor Brown) 12.93 

French (Professor Foulet) 17.66 

French (Professor Schinz) 27.76 

Geology 18.70 

German (Dr. AVeyhe) 14.80 

Italian 40.55 

Psychology 46.19 

Sanskrit 3.07 



36 

The income on special funds for the year is as follows: 

Dr. Ehoads Memorial Fund $70.16 

Class of 1902 (devoted to books 

on Philosophy) 29.14 

Sale of books and fines 279.53 

Hall Libraries 226.25 

Gifts have been as follows : 

From Miss Garrett: 

President's office $10.86 

Elizabethan Literature (Dr. 

Hatcher) 100.00 

Early English (Professor 

Brown) 60.00 

British Museum Catalogue 500.00 

670.86 

From Dean Reilly, 

English (Professor Brown) 64.92 

From Mr. Rosengarten, 

English (Professor Brown) 50.00 

From Miss Stevens, 

Latin Seminary 25.00 

From the Class of 1893 in memory 
of Madeline Vaughan Abbott 
Bushnell, 
English Literature (Professor 

Donnelly) 500.00 

$1,310.78 

Unexpended net balances from 1907-08 closed out dur- 
ing the year were as follows : 

Sale of books $147.17 

Latin (Professor Frank) 19.31 

English Drama (Professor Don- 
nelly) 42.99 



37 

Unexpended net balances for 1908-09 are as follows : 

Sale of books $17.74 

Rhoads Memorial Fund 1.54 

Anna Ottendorfer Memorial Fund 367.94 

Miss Stevens' gift 2.51 

Inter Library Loans. 

During the past year we have borrowed from other insti- 
tutions 78 volumes as follows : 

Columbia University 10 

Free Library of Philadelphia 2 

Harvard University Library 10 

Library Company of Philadelphia 24 

Mercantile Library of Philadelphia 4 

University of Pennsylvania Library 20 

Princeton University Library 1 

Philadelphia Divinity School 1 

Library of Congress 6 

Books have been lent to other institutions as follows : 

University of Pennsylvania Library 2 

Princeton University Library . ; 1 

Mount Holyoke Library 5 

Harvard University Library 2 

The Building. 

Toward the close of the summer, too late to note the 
effect on the general working of the library, certain changes 
in rooms were made as follows : 

The office of the Dean of the college was moved to Taylor 
Hall. In the room vacated was placed the Christian Union 
Library. The former Christian Union Library was occupied 
by the cataloguing department. In the former cataloguing 
room were placed the reference books heretofore in the stack 
room. So far as the library was concerned these changes 
were brought about to make room for the reference books 



38 

which have formerly been most inadequately shelved. JSTo 
special tables were provided for their use and in some 
instances the light was very imperfect. In the present room 
there is ample shelf space, table room, and excellent light, 
both natural and electric. It is expected that the change will 
result in an increased use of these important books. The 
dictionaries remain where they were, at the end of the stack 
nearer the Reference Room. This location will best serve all 
classes of readers. Reference books may still be taken to the 
Reading Room and seminaries when needed but the increased 
convenience in using them will greatly lessen this demand. 

The cataloguing department across the hall from the 
Reference Room is farther removed from the catalogue and 
the stack than before, but it is hoped the greater convenience 
of access to the reference books will compensate for this. 

Bibliographical books, used chiefly in selecting and 
ordering books, have been moved from their place in the stack 
to the Reference Room, where the facilities for consulting 
them are much greater. These changes left the office of the 
head librarian remote and inconveniently situated at the 
opposite end of the stack room, and at the opening of college 
an exchange was made with the Semitic Seminary. The gen- 
eral administration work of the library will undoubtedly be 
facilitated by this change, and it is hoped that the better 
lighting will prove an advantage to the Semitic Seminary. 

An additional office for the English department being 
needed, a portion of the non-resident students' cloak room was 
partitioned off and a very attractive room was made avail- 
able. A second office for the department of Psychology was 
also provided by placing a partial partition in one of the 
laboratories. 

During the summer the books in the main library, the 
seminaries, and professors' offices were cleaned with the 
vacuum cleaner. This proved very satisfactory; not only 
was the dust removed from the books, but it was taken from 
the building, and the books suffered less than in the old way 
of cleaning by hand. 



39 

Inventory. . -„ 

At the date of the last report there were still missing 
from the inventory of 1905, 27 volumes, two of which have 
since been found. Of the 32 volumes missing from the main 
library, the departmental library, and seminaries in the 1907 
inventory, five have since been found. Of the 39 volumes 
missing from the hall libraries at the same time, 8 volumes 
have been found, and 11 replaced. These 71 volumes are 
still counted as missing, not lost, and have not yet been 
deducted from the total number of volumes in the library. 

The biennial inventory of 1909 took place during the 
summer, and as a preliminary report 77 volumes are noted as 
missing. Many of these will undoubtedly be found during 
the year. When it is considered that very slight supervision 
is possible even of the books in the stacks, together with the 
fact that practically no books are withheld from the students, 
the loss is small. It is especially significant that from the 
thirteen seminary libraries, only 3 volumes, and from the 
halls only 26 volumes, are missing. The 77 missing volumes 
are as follows : 

Missing. 

Main stack 30 

Christian Union Library 1 

Departmental libraries : 

Biology 5 

Botany 2 

Chemistry 4 

Geology 5 

Physics 1 

— 17 

Seminaries : 

Art 1 

Psychology 2 

— 3 



40 



Missing- 

Halls : 

Radnor 2 

Merion 8 

Denbigh 2 

Pembroke East 5 

Pembroke West 2 

Rockefeller 5 

Non-resident 2 

— 26 

Total 77 

General Administration. 

The staff has remained practically without change dur- 
ing the past year, the only changes occurring in the minor 
posts of errand girl and assistant in the Reserved Book Room. 
Miss Baker, the head cataloguer, first entered upon her duties 
two months preceding the period covered by this report. Miss 
Jennings, who had served the library during six years as 
special cataloguer, accepted a regular appointment as assistant 
cataloguer this year. Miss Wagenhurst, to recover from an 
illness, was granted a leave of absence from August 1st, her 
place being supplied by her sister, who had been connected 
with the library several years ago. Miss Dunn, at the loan 
desk, and Miss Blackburn, in the Reserved Book Room, con- 
tinued their duties. Student assistants for the year, have 
been : Miss Mary Eleanor Bartholomew, Miss Elise Donald- 
son, Miss Mary Ethel Ladd, Miss Anita Uarda Boggs, Miss 
Ruth Anita Wade. With the exception of the last named, 
the same students had held these posts for two or three years 
each. 

As noted before, such success as has attended the work 
of the year has been the result of the increased efficiency of 
the staff. With the added experience has come an under- 
standing of the work and a sense of responsibility which can- 
not be too highly commended. The cordial cooperation of 
the faculty likewise warrants comment. 



41 

In closing permit me to thank you for your continued 
support and assistance in carrying on the library. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mart L. Jones,, 

Librarian. 



42 



Gifts to Bryn Mawr College Library, 1908-09. 
Gifts from Individuals. 

Miss Annie H. Abel: Proposals for an Indian State, 
1778-1878 ; History of Events Resulting in Indian Consolida- 
tion West of the Mississippi. 

Mr. Charles Francis Adams: Colonel John Quincy, a 
Public Character of New England's Provincial Period. 

Mr. W. R. Andrews : Republican Campaign Text Book. 

Mr. C. S. Babbitt : Remedy for the Decadence of the 
Latin Race ; Doctrine of Electrical Circles. 

Mr. Thomas Willing Balch : Balch, Law of Oresme, 
Copernicus and Gresham. 

Miss Cora A. Benneson : Proceedings of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science, vol. 58, Peabody 
Museum Memoirs, vol. 4, no. 2 ; Science. 

Miss Anne G. Brinton : Memoires du Due de Saint- 
Simon, vols. 2, 4 ; Dumas, Le Demi-Monde ; Pailleron, Le 
Monde ou l'on s'ennuie ; Sacher-Mazoch ; Le Legs de Cain ; 
Chotteau, Les Frangais en Amerique ; Flaubert, Madame 
Bovary, 2 v. ; Fabre, Le Chevrier. 

Professor Isabelle Bronk : Bronk, The Poesies diverses 
of Antoine Furetiere. 

Professor Carleton Fairchild Brown: Catalogus Impres- 
sorum Librorum Bibliothecae Bodleianae in Academia Oxoni- 
ensi. 

Mr. Melville T. Cook : Cook, Hypertrophied Fruit of 
Bucida Buceras ; Cook, Insect Galls of Indiana ; Cook, Notes 
on the Embryology of the Caryophyllacese. 

Dr. Whitman Cross : 7 reprints. 

Mr. Theodore M. Davis: Davis, The Tomb of Ioniya 
and Toniyou ; The Tomb of Hatshopsitu. 

Dr. Emmet Densmore: Densmore, Sex Equality; Tut- 
tle, Arcana of Nature. 

Hon. Chauncey M. Depew: Speeches, March 10, 12, 
April 4, 25, 1908; November 14, 1908; June 15, 1909; 



43 

December 15, 1908 ; January 18, 1909 ; February 6, 1909 ; 
April 10, 1909 ; May 17, 1909 ; July 9, 1909. 

Messrs. Duffield & Co. : Viele, Heartbreak Hill. 

Dr. Rh. Erdmann : Erdmann, Experimentelle Unter- 
suchung der Massenverhaltnisse von Plasma. 

II Duca Francesca di Silvestri Falconieri ; Patria 
Nostra, Due Poesie di Elizabeth B. Browning. 

Miss Mary E. Garrett: Gilman, Debussy's Pelleas et 
Melisande. 

Mr. Edward Ginn: Hull, Two Hague Conferences. 

Mr. James Greene : Greene, Personal Recollections of 
David Henry Chamberlain. 

Mr. Stephen M. Griswold: Sixty Years with Plymouth 
Church. 

Professor Eduard Gronau: Das apostolische Glaubens- 
bekenntnis. 

Dr. John Iredelle Dillard Hinds : Hinds, Inorganic 
Chemistry. 

Professor Richard Thayer Holbrook : Corneille, Le Cid ; 
Eggert, Bataille de Dames. 

Mr. George lies : Electricity Uncovers a Law of Evolu- 
tion. 

Mr. William A. Ingham : About, L'homme a l'oreille 
cassee ; Le nez d'un notaire ; Arago, Biographies of 
Distinguished Scientific Men ; Bastiat, Essays on Political 
Economy; Bauerman, Treatise on the Metallurgy of Iron; 
Beaver, Message to the General Assembly of Pennsylvania, 
1889; Blanqui, Histoire de l'economie politique en Europe, 
2 v. ; Boston and Its Suburbs, a guide book ; Bristed, Inter- 
ference Theory of Government ; Byles, Sophisms of Free- 
trade; Campin, Practice of Hand-turning; Contzen, Grund- 
bau der ]STationalokonomie ; Craik, A Woman's Thoughts 
about Women ; Denslow, Principles of the Economic Phil- 
osophy of Society, Government and Industry; Dietzel, Die 
Volkswirthschaft ; Duncan, Cruise of the Shining Light ; 
Dymond, Essays on the Principles of Morality ; Fabre, Abbe 
Tigrane ; Fawcett, Manual of Political Economy ; Fay, 
Music-study in Germany ; George, Social Problems ; Gervinus, 



44 

Einleitung in die Geschickte des neimzelinten Jahrhunderts ; 
Gierke, Rechtsgeschichte der deutschen Genossenschaft ; 
Grant, Beet-root Sugar; Horn, Bankf reiheit ; Irving, Con- 
quest of Granada ; Jackson, Elements of Conic Sections ; 
Jacob, Historical Inquiry into the Production and Consump- 
tion of the Precious Metals ; Jannettaz, Guide to the Deter- 
mination of Rocks ; Kirke, My Southern Friends ; Krug, 
Allgemeines Handworterbuch der Philosophischen Wissen- 
schaften ; Krug, Das koniglich sachsische Gewerbegesetz ; 
Law, Remarks on the Fable of the Bees ; Leisure Hours in 
Town ; Lewis, Remarks on the Use and Abuse of Some Politi- 
cal Terms ; List, National System of Political Economy ; 
Malthus, Principles of Political Economy; Molesworth, 
Pocket-book for Civil and Mechanical Engineers ; Otis, Ele- 
mentary German ; Rentzsch, Handworterbuch der Volks- 
wirthschaftslehre ; Report of the Commissioners Appointed 
to Investigate the Bituminous Coal Mines of Pennsylvania ; 
Ritter, History of Ancient Philosophy; Robinson, New Ele- 
mentary Algebra ; Rohrich, Sechs Vortrage aus dem Gebiete 
der Volkswirthschaf t ; Roscher, Ansichten der Volkswirth- 
schaf t ; Say, Treatise on Political Economy ; Schaffle, Das 
Gesellschaf tliche System der Menschlichen Wirthschaf t ; 
Schrader, Die Associationen ; Schulze-Delitzsch, Die Arbeit- 
enden Klassen, Die Gesetzgebung iiber die privatrechtliche 
Stellung der Erwerbs und Wirthschaf tsgenossenschaften ; 
Sociale Rechte unci Pflichten ; Vorschuss und Creclitvereine 
als Volksbanken ; Schwarzwaller, Wirthschaf tspredigten ; 
Vico, Science Nouvelle. 

Mr. James Hopwood Jeans : Jeans, Theoretical 
Mechanics. 

Miss Anna Jonas : Statistical Atlas of the United States, 

Mrs. M. C. Jordan: Clippings and Pamphlets (Cruelty 
to Animals). 

Dr. Henry C. Lea : Academy of Natural Sciences, Pro- 
ceedings, 1908, pts. 2-3, 1909, pt. 1. 

Mr. John B. Leeds : Blatchf ord, Merrie England ; Vail, 
Modem Socialism, Principles of Scientific Socialism ; Simons, 
Class Struggles in America, revised edition ; Untermann, 



45 

The World's Revolutions ; Engels, Origin of the Family ; 
Mills, Struggle for Existence; Engels, Socialism; Simons, 
Woman and the Social Problem; jSToyes, Evolution of the 
Class Struggle; Vail, Trust Question; La Fargue, Socialism 
and the Intellectuals ; Phillips, Fearless Books. 

Messrs. Lemcke & Buechner: Lemcke, Catalogue Rais- 
onne, pts. 1-3 and two supplements ; Spemann's Kunst Kal- 
endar, 1910. 

Mr. Arthur L. Lesher: Strong, Systematic Theology, 3 
v., Outlines of Systematic Theology; The Great Poets and 
their Theology ; Christ in Creation and Ethical Monism. 

Le Due de Loubat : Diaz, Conquete de la Nouvelle- 
Espagne ; Codex Borgia, vol. 3. 

Dr. M. Phillips Mason : Kidd, Social Evolution. 

Mr. John E. B. Mayor : The Church of Scotland. 

Mr. A. B. Nichols : Lee, The Mormon Menace. 

Miss Phoebe Cushing jSTutting: Romances of Sir Guy 
of Warwick; Romance of Sir Beves of Hamtoun. 

Dr. Marion Parris : Democratic Campaign Text-book. 

Dr. Bertha Haven Putnam: Putnam, Enforcement of 
the Statutes of Labourers. 

Railway World: Depreciated Currency and Diminished 
Railway Rates. 

Professor George Lansing Raymond : Raymond, The 
Psychology of Inspiration ; Comparative ^Esthetics, 8 v. ; 
Dante and Collected Verse. 

Professor Eugene Ritter: Mine, de Stael, Lettres 
Inedites. 

Mr. Reginald C. Robbins : Poems of Personality. 

Mr. Chalfant Robinson: Robinson, History of Two 
Reciprocity Treaties. 

Dr. Catharine Saunders : Saunders, Costume in Roman 
Comedy. 

Mr. William Ellis Scull : Scull, Union with God. 

Mr. Edwin Jaquett Sellers: Genealogy of Dr. Francis 
Joseph Pfeiffer; Genealogy of the Kollock Family; Allied 
Families of Delaware ; Sellers, Genealogy of the Jaquett 
Family. 



46 

Dr. Charles Sprague-Smith and Miss Hilda Sprague- 
Smith: Sprague-Smith, Working with the People, Poems, 
Barbizon Days. 

Messrs. G. E. Stechert & Co. : Hinrich's Halbjahrs-Kata- 
logy 1908, pt. 1. 

Dr. Nettie M. Stevens: Archiv fiir Entwickelungsme- 
chanik, vols. 25, 26. 

Professor J. Ward Stimson: Stimson, Wandering 
Chords. 

Hon. William Snlzer: Speech in the House of Repre- 
sentatives, July 9, 1909. 

Mr. James M. Swank : Swank, Progressive Pennsyl- 
vania. 

President M. Carey Thomas: Albright, A Typical 
Shakespearean Stage ; Official Bulletin of Pennsylvania 
State Educational Association, Fiftieth Annual Session, 
1906; Juvenile Court and House of Detention, Philadelphia, 
1908 ; National Conference of Charities and Corrections, 
Proceedings, 1908 ; Monument to William Pepper, M.D. ; 
University of Pennsylvania, Illustrated, 1906. 

M. Hugues Vaganay : Le mariage honni par Desportes, 
Louange par Blanchon, Le Gaygnard, Rouspeau. 

Mr. Henry Walters: Descriptive Catalogue of Books 
Printed in the Fifteenth Century, in the Library of Henry 
Walters. 

Hon. Irving P. Wanger: Congressional Record, vol. 42, 
pts. 1-8 and index ; vol. 43, pts. 1-4 and index ; Congressional 
Directory, Sixty-First Congress, First Session ; Official Direc- 
tory, Sixtieth Congress, First and Second Sessions ; Special 
Message from the President of the United States Transmit- 
ting a Report of the National Conservation Commission ; Con- 
ference of the Governors of the United States, White House, 
May 13th-15th, United States Commission of Fish and Fish- 
eries—Report, 1888, 1893, 1894, 1896, 1898-1904, Bulletin, 
vols. 23 3 , 24, Document, no. 643 ; Statistical Abstract of the 
United States, 1906-1908 ; Map of the United States Showing 
Principal Explorers and Early Roads and Highways ; Pro- 
ceedings of the Conference on the Care of Dependent Chil- 



47 

dren, held at Washington, D. C, January 25-26, 1909 ; Tariff 
Hearings, Sixtieth Congress, vols. 1-9. 

Professor Joseph W. Warren: Howell, Text-book of 
Physiology ; Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology, Bul- 
letin, v. 23, no. 1; Harvard University Catalogue, 1890-91; 
Statistics of the Fisheries of the United States ; Statistical 
Review of the Coast Fisheries of the United States ; Hand- 
book on the Prevention of Tuberculosis ; Journal of the 
Society for Psychical Research, nos. 52, 91, 94; American 
Journal of Psychology, v. 5, no. 4 ; Proceedings of the Ameri- 
can Association for the Advancement of Science, vols. 43, 52. 

Mr. F. Waylancl Smith: Smith, Materialism and Chris- 
tianity ; Shall we Choose Socialism ? 

Dr. Charles Clarence Williamson: Tindall, Origin and 
Government of the District of Columbia. 

Dr. Lorande Loss Woodruff: Woodruff, Effects of Alco- 
hol on the Life Cycle of Infusoria ; Life Cycle of Paramecium 
when Subjected to a Varied Environment. 

Professor Wilmer Cave Wright: Garrison, Letters and 
Memorials ; Libanius, Opera, v. 4. 

Gifts and Exchanges from Institutions, Societies, Etc., 

1908-09. 

Agnes Irwin School: Heads of Families, First Census 
of United States, 1790, 12 vols. 

American Anti-Boycott Association: Decision of Jus- 
tice Wright in Contempt Proceedings Against Samuel Gomp- 
ers, Frank Morrison and John Mitchell, etc. ; Arguments in 
Contempt Proceedings — The Buck's Stove and Range Com- 
pany vs. American Federation of Labor. 

American Marathi Mission: Report, 1908. 

American Peace Society: Report, 1909. 

American School of Metaphysics : Original Discovery 
and Genuine Development of Mental Science; Whipple, 
Methods of Healing. 

Andover Theological Seminary: Addresses. 

Anti-Imperalist League : Apologia pro vita sua. 



48 

Argentine Republic, Consul General: Message of the 
President of the Republic on Opening the Session of the 
Argentine Congress in May, 1909 ; Argentine International 
Trade. 

• Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the 
Southern States : Proceedings of the Fourteenth Annual 
Meeting, 1908. 

Australia, Commonwealth Statistician: Official Year- 
book, 1901-07, no. 1-2. 

Bodleian Library : Scott, National Character of English 
Architecture ; Beaven, Sir William Temple ; Sandeman, 
Calais under English Rule; Staff-kalendar, 1909; Ashton- 
Gwatkin, Michelangelo; Spencer, Sheridan's School for 
Scandal, Act 4, Scene 1, translated into Greek ; Brooks, Rela- 
tion between Art and Morality; Smith, Influence of British 
Rule in India on Home Politics; Dark, Nepoleo in Sancta 
Helena Insula Captivus Secum Loquitur; Collins, The Inter- 
pretation of Vergil with Special Reference to Macrobius ; 
Owen, The Connection between England and Burgundy Dur- 
ing the First Half of the Fifteenth Century. 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts: Annual Report, 1908; 
Bulletin, vol. 2, nos. 1-4, 6, vol. 3, nos. 2, 4, 5, vol. 4, no. 18. 

Boston Public Library: Ford, Some Materials for a 
Bibliography of the Official Publications of the Continental 
Congress, 1774-89. 

Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences : Cold Spring 
Harbor Monographs, vol. 7. 

Bryn Mawr Mathematical Journal Club: Papers, vols. 
8, 9, 10*. 

Bryn Mawr College Monographs : Reprint series, vol. 7. 

California Academy of Sciences: Proceedings, Ser. 4, 
vol. 3, pp. 1-48. 

California Bureau of Labor Statistics : Biennial Reports, 
1907-08. 

University of California: Publications — Zoology, vol. 5, 
nos. 1-3, vol. 6, nos. 1-3 ; Physiology, vol. 3, nos. 13-15 ; Phil- 
osophy, vol. 2, nos. 1-3 ; Reprints from the Department of 
Anatomy of the University of California, vol. 3. 



49 

Canada Department of Agriculture : Index to Archives 
from 1872-1908. 

Canada Geological Survey: 13 publications, 36 maps. 

Canada, Department of Mines: Report on Mining and 
Metallurgical Industries of Canada, 1906-08. 

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: 
Annual Report, no. 3 ; Bulletin, no. 2 ; Plan for an Exchange 
of Teachers between United States and Prussia; Rules for 
the Admission of Institutions and for the Granting of Retir- 
ing Allowances. 

Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh : Catalogue of a Memorial 
Exhibition of the Works of Augustus St. Gaudens. 

Carnegie Institute, Board of Trustees, Pittsburgh: 
Memorials of the Celebration of the Carnegie Institute at 
Pittsburgh. 

Carnegie Institution of Washington : Chamberlin, 
Gases in Rocks ; Hale & Fox, Rotation Period of the Sun 5 
Barus, Condensation of Vapor as Induced by Nuclei and Ions ; 
Atlas of Maps Accompanying the Report of the Commission 
upon the California Earthquake, xlpril 18, 1906 ; Cannon, 
Topography of the Chlorophyll Apparatus in Desert Plants ; 
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Pumpelly, Explorations in Turkestan, 2 v. ; Hasse, Index of 
Economic Material in Documents of the States of the United 
States, California, 1849-1904; Illinois, 1809-1904; Guide to 
the Manuscript Materials for the History of the United States 
to 1783, in the British Museum; Papers from the Tortugas 
Laboratory, 2 v. ; Jones- Anderson, Absorption Spectra of 
Solutions ; Chamberlin and others, Tidal and Other Problems ; 
Castle, Studies of Inheritance in Rabbits ; Eigenmann, Cave 
Vertebrates of America; Richards, Electrochemical Investi- 
gation of Liquid Amalgams of Thallium, etc. ; Shull, Bursa 
Bursa-Pastores and Bursa Heegeri Biotypes and Hybrids ; 
ISToguchi, Snake Venoms ; Yearbook, no. 7. 

Catholic University of America ; General Index to Bulle- 
tins vols. 1-13 ; Bulletin vol. 8, no. 3. 

Central Conference of American Rabbis : Year-book, 
1908, vol. XVIII ; Philipson, The Jew in America. 



50 

Chicago University Press: Tenth Annual Conference 
of the Association of American Universities. 

College Settlements Association : Denison House Report, 
1908. 

> College of Science and Engineering, Kyoto, Japan : 
Memoirs, vol. 1, no. 4, 1908. 

Colorado State Historical and Natural History Society: 
Biennial Report, 1907-08. 

Colorado, University of : Studies, vol. 6, no. 1-4. 

Columbia University : 44 Dissertations ; Material by 
and about E. A. Poe, to be found in the Library of Columbia 
University. 

Conference for Education in the South : Proceedings of 
the 11th Conference. 

Connecticut Factory Inspector: Annual Report, vols. 
18, 19, 20 ; Biennial Report, vol. 1. 

Connecticut State Geological and Natural History Sur- 
vey: Bulletin, nos. 10, 11, 12. 

Cornell University : 11 Dissertations ; Ten Year Book, 
vol. 4. 

Dante Society: Annual Report, 1907. 

Des Moines Commercial Club : Des Moines Plan of City 
Government. 

Eastern Star Company : Ramspacher, The Agitator. 

Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, New York City: 
Historical Sketch and Centennial Celebration. 

Friends' General Conference Advancement Committee : 
Penn and Religious Liberty. 

Universite de Geneve : Seance Solennelle de Distribution 
des Prix de Concours 4 Juin '08. 

Georgia Geological Survey: Gold Deposits of Georgia. 

Goteborgs Hogskolas : Aarsskrift, v. 13-14. 

Groningen, University of: Jaarbock, 1907-08. 

Hartford Theological Seminary: Angus, Hellenistic 
and Hellenism in our Universities. 

Harvard University Library: Bibliographical Contribu- 
tions, no. 57. 

Haverford College: Haverford Essays. 



51 

Hispanic Society of America : Catalogue of Paintings 
by Ignacio Zuloaga; Catalogue of Paintings by Joaquin 
Sorolla Y Basticla; International Studio, March-April, 1909. 

Illinois State Board of Arbitration : Eleventh Annual 
Keport, 1908. 

Illinois State Geological Survey: Bulletin, nos. 9-10. 

Illinois State Historical Library : Lincoln-Douglas 
Debates of 1858 ; Transactions of Illinois State Historical 
Society, 1907 ; Journal of the Illinois State Historical 
Society, vol. 1, no. 2-3 ; Governor's Letter-Book, 1818-1834. 

Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics : Annual Coal 
Keport, 1900, 1902-1907 ; Annual Keport of Free Employ- 
ment Offices; Biennial Report, 1898, 1902, 1904, 1906. 

Indiana Geological Survey: Thirty-second Annual 
Report. 

Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States : 
Proceedings of the Third Annual Convention. 

International Bureau of American Republics : Reports 
of Charles E. Magoon. 

Iowa Bureau of Labor Statistics: Report, vol. 13. 

Iowa Secretary of State : Biennial Report of the Bureau 
of Labor Statistics, v. 13. 

Jena University: 192 dissertations. 

John F. Slater Fund: Proceedings, 1907-08. 

Johns Hopkins University: 23 dissertations. 

Kansas Bureau of Labor and Industry : Annual Report, 
vols. 13-15, 22-24; Biennial Report, vol. 2; Bulletin, 1905. 

Lake Forest College: Bross Library, vols. 1-4. 

Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian : 
Annual Meeting, Proceedings, no. 26. 

Lake Mohonk Conference on International Arbitration: 
Report of the Annual Meeting, 1908, 1909. 

Leland Stanford Junior University : Kellogg, Inheritance 
in Silkworms; MacFarland, The Opisthobranchiate Mol- 
lusca of the Branner-Agassiz Expedition to Brazil ; Annual 
Report of the President of the University, vols. 4-5. 

Litchfield County University Club: Job, Sport of Bird 
Study ; Vaill, The County Regiment ; The Clergy of Litch- 
field Countv. 



52 

Liverpool Biological Society: Proceedings and Transac- 
tions, vol. 22. 

MoKinley Memorial: History of the Movement. 

Maine Bureau of Industrial and Labor Statistics: 
Report, vols. 1-2, 4-16, 22. 

Maryland Bureau of Statistics : Annual Report, 1908. 

University of Maryland: Centennial Celebration of the 
Foundation of the University of Maryland. 

Massachusetts State Board of Charity: Annual Report, 
1908. 

Massachusetts State Free Employment Offices : Annual 
Report, vol. 1, 1907. 

Massachusetts Bureau of Statistics of Labor: Annual 
Statistics of Manufacturers, vols. 13, 19-21, 33 ; Annual Re- 
port, vols. 1-5, 7, 9-10, 13, 16-20, 21, 29, 31, 33, 36, 38; Bul- 
letin nos. 2, 4, 8-17, 21-22, 24-30, 56-63. 

Merchants' Association of ISTew York: Year-book, 1909 ; 
Disposal of West Side Railroad Tracks ; Plan for Reforming 
the Accounts, Records and Reports of New York City; The 
House Fly at the Bar; Address in Memory of William F. 
King. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art: Thirty-ninth Annual 
Report; List of Books and Periodicals Relating to Modern 
German Art and Artists in the Library of the Museum. 

Michigan Board of Health : Annual Report, 1907. 

Michigan Bureau of Labor: Annual Report, vols. 24-26. 

University of Michigan : Tenth Report of the Michigan 
Academy of Science ; Kaufman, Contribution to the Physi- 
ology of the Saproleguiacese ; Value of Humanistic Studies 
as a Preparation for the Study of Law; Doctrine of Formal 
Discipline in the Light of Contemporary Psychology ; Moliere, 
L'Avare ; Beaumarchais, Le Barbier de Seville ; Bailey, 
Induction Coils ; Handbook for the First Exhibition of the 
Ann Arbor Art Association. 

Minnesota Department of Public Instruction: Lincoln 
Centenary. 

Missouri Botanical Garden: Annual Report, vol. 19, 
1908. 



53 

University of Missouri : Studies, Social Science series, 
vol. 2, nos. 2-4. 

Montana, Bureau of Agriculture, Labor and Industry: 
Annual Report, vol. 11, 1908. 

National Child Labor Committee: Child Labor Legisla- 
tion ; Topics and Suggestions for Debates on Child Labor. 

National Civic Federation: Proceedings of the National 
Conference on Trusts and Combinations, October 22-25, 
1907 ; Report of Public Ownership and Operation Commit- 
tee, vols. 1 and 2. 

National Conference of Charities and Corrections : Pro- 
ceedings, vols. 1899-1904. 

National Consumers' League: Goldmark, United States 
Supreme Court and Working Women ; Women in Industry ; 
Child Labor Legislation; Annual Report, 1901, 1903, 1904, 
1906, 1907 ; Summary Statement of the Work of the First 
Year. 

National Prison Association: Proceedings, 1890, 1902, 
1905, 1906. 

University of Nebraska : Studies, vol. 6, nos. 1,3,4; vol. 
7, nos. 1, 3 ; vol. 1-4 ; vol. 9, nos. 1-2. 

New Hampshire Bureau of Labor: Biennial Report, 
1907-08. 

New Jersey State Geologist: Annual Report, 1908. 
New Jersey Bureau of Labor Statistics : Annual Report, 
1908. 

New York Association for the Blind: Prevention of 
Blindness. 

New York ( City) Board of Education : Annual Report, 
1906; Directory of Teachers in the Public Schools. 

New York (State) Education Department: Bulletin 
nos. 432-434, 436, 437, 443, 444, 448, 449. 

New York (State) Hospital for the Care of Crippled 
and Deformed Children : Annual Report, no. 8. 

New York (State) Department of Labor: Annual 
Report, vols. 1, 2, 7, 9, 11, 13, Bureau of Mediation and 
Arbitration; Annual Report, vols. 1, 2, 7, 13, Bureau of Fac- 
tory Inspection; Annual Report, vols. 1, 6, 11, 12, 13, Bureau 
of Labor Statistics. 



54 

New York (State) Commissioner of Labor: Annual 
Report, 1907. 

New York ( State) Bureau of Labor Statistics : Annual 
Report, 1907. 

New York (State) Library: Report of Governor 
Hughes on Speculation in Securities and Commodities. 

North Carolina, University of : Elisha Mitchell Scientific 
Society ; Journal, vol. 24, no. 2 ; vol. 25, no. 2. 

North Dakota Department of Agriculture and Labor: 
Biennial Report, vols. 8, 9, 10 ; North Dakota Magazine, 7 
numbers. 

Ohio Bureau of Labor Statistics : Annual Report, vols. 
25-27, 29-31. 

Oklahoma Geological Survey : Bulletin, no. 1. 

Paris, Ministere de l'instruction publique : Catalogue des 
Theses, fasc. 24. 

Paris, Universite de Paris. Bibliotheque : Melanges 
d'histoire ancienne. 

Peace Society of the City of New York : Carnegie, The 
Path to Peace; Carnegie, Supplement to the Path to Peace. 

Pennsylvania History Club : Publications, vol. 1. 

Pennsylvania State Library: Department of Agricul- 
ture, Report, 1907 ; Archives, ser. 6, vols. 1-15, pts. 1-2 ; 
Auditor General, Report, 1907-08 ; Banking Commission, 
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Report, 1908 ; Department of Fisheries, Report, 1907 ; Divi- 
sion of Forestry, Report, 1907 ; G. A. R. Encampment, Pro- 
ceedings, 41-43 ; Board of Health, Report, 1907 ; Insurance 
Commissioner, Annual Report, 1907, pt. 2 ; Department of 
Internal Affairs, Report, 1907, pt. 3, 1908, pts. 1-2, 4; Laws 
of General Assembly, 1909 ; Department of Mines, Report, 
1907, pts. 1-2 ; Superintendent of Public Instruction, Report, 
1908 ; Department of Public Printing, Report, 1908, Railroad 
Commission, Annual Report, 1908 ; Regimental Histories, 
History of the 124th Pennsylvania Volunteers, Pennsylvania 
Reserves at Antietam, Second Brigade; Sinking Fund Com- 
mission, Report, 1908 ; State College, Report, 1907-08 ; 
Department of State Highway, Report, 1907, Statutes at 



55 ' 

Large, vols. 9-12; Soldiers' Orphan Schools, Report, 1908; 
State Treasurer, Eeport, 1908 ; Topographic and Geological 
Survey, Eeport, 1906-08 ; Water Supply Commission, Report, 
1907 ; miscellaneous bulletins, 15. 

Pennsylvania, University of: Proceedings of Com- 
mencement, 1909 ; Contributions from the Botanical Labora- 
tory, vol. 2, no. 2, vol. 3, nos. 1-2 ; Contributions from the 
Zoological Laboratory, 1902, vol. 14, 1908-09; publications — 
Astronomical Series, v. 2, pts. 2-3, v. 3, -pt. 3 ; History 
Series, no. 3, Calendar of the Papers of Benjamin Franklin; 
Series in Philology and Literature, vols. 10-12 ; Series in 
Political Economy and Public Law, nos. 18-21 ; 19 disserta- 
tions. 

Philadelphia Parish Schools : Educational briefs, 4 num- 
bers. 

Radcliffe College : Monographs, no. 14, Adams, The 
Neglected Period of Anti-Slavery in America. 

St. Thomas, University of, Manila ; Chicote y Beltran, 
Idea general de la Legislacion sobre el Matrimonie en 
Pilipinas ; Important Letter of Pope Pius X to Manila Uni- 
versity of St. Thomas. 

Smithsonian Institution: Annual Report, 1907; Mis- 
cellaneous Collections, vol. 53, nos. 3-4, no. 1803, 1807, vol. 
52, no. 1813, vol. 49, no. 1720, vol. 52, no. 1860. 

Societe Beige d'Astronomie : 5 pamphlets. 

Standard Oil Company: Briefs of counsel for the Stan- 
dard Oil Company on the Law and the Facts Recently Pre- 
sented before the Circuit Court of the United States. 

Strassburg Universitaet : 19 dissertations. 

Tennessee Mining Department: Annual Report, 1906, 
1907. 

Texas, University of: Bulletin, nos. 102, 105, 115, 120, 
121, 123. 

Tufts College: Studies, v. 2, no. 3, Scientific Series. 

University Club of New York : Annual, 1909-10. 

Washington University: Hus, An Ecological Cross Sec- 
tion of the Mississippi River in the Region of St. Louis, Mo. 

Washington, University of : University Studies, nos. 1-2. 



56 

Wellcome Chemical Research Laboratories : Papers, nos. 
78-92. 

West Virginia Bureau of Labor: Biennial Report, 
1905-06, 1907-08. 

' Williams College: Induction of President Garfield, 
October 7, 190,8 ; Marlowe, The Jew of Malta. 

Wisconsin Tree Library Commission: The Negro Prob- 
lem; Comparative Legislation Bulletin, 13-20. 

Wisconsin Railroad Commission: Opinions and Deci- 
sions, vols. 1-2; Biennial Report, 1906, 1907; Second Annual 
Report ; advanced sheets of Second Annual Report ; 40 pam- 
phlets. 

Wisconsin State Historical Society: Wisconsin His- 
torical Collections, vols. 16-18 ; Wisconsin State Historical 
Library Building, Memorial Volume, 1901 ; Descriptive List 
of Manuscript Collections ; Annotated Catalogue of News- 
paper Files in the Library of the Wisconsin State Historical 
Society; Davidson, Negro Slavery in Wisconsin; Thwaites, 
Cyrus Hall McCormick and the Reaper. 

University of Wisconsin: Economics and Political Sci- 
ence Series, Bulletin, vol. 3, no. 2, vols. 4-5 ; Engineering 
Series, Bulletin, vol. 4, no. 3-5 ; General Series, Bulletin, no. 
236; History Series, Bulletin, vol. 1, no. 4; Philology and 
Literature Series, Bulletin, vol. 4, no. 2 ; Science Series, Bul- 
letin, vol. 3, no. 5, 7-8 ; University Extension Series, Bulle- 
tin, vol. 1, no. 1. 

Yale University Library: Gooch & Beyer, Electrolytic 
Estimation of Lead and of Manganese by the Use of the Fil- 
tering Crucible ; Wieland, Revision of the Protostigidoe ; 
Bradley, On the Analysis of the Mineral Warinckite; 
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Mixter, The Heat of Formation of Titanum Dioxide, etc. ; 
Bush, Notes on the Family Pyramidellidoe ; Gooch- Ward, 
Precipitation of Copper Oxalate in Analysis ; Browning & 
Palmer, The Volumetric and Gravimetric Estimation of 
Thallium in Alkaline Solution by means of Potassium Ferri- 
cyanide ; Lathrop, The Brass Industry in Connecticut ; 5 
dissertations. 



57 

Periodicals, the Gift of Publishers. 
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terly; Washington Chapel Chronicle; Woman's Missionary 
Friend. 



58 



Report of the Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

To the President, Madam.: 

I have the honor to make the following report on the 
work of the department of gymnastics and athletics during 
the year 1908-09. 

Physical Examinations. 

Three hundred and twenty students were examined in 
October, 1908, and of these nine were excused the full strength 
tests ; three hundred and ten students were re-examined in 
April, 1909, and of these six were excused the full strength 
tests. 

College averages from these examinations : 





Weight 
kg. 


Height 
cm. 


Expansion 

cm. 


Strength 
kg. 


Lung 
Capacity 








Chest 


9th Rib 






Sem. 


I . . 56.6 


161.71 


6.03 


6.17 


274.00 


184 


Sem. 


II . 57.1 


161.94 


6.36 


6.42 


284.18 


184 






Class 


Averages. 








Class of 1909 : 












Sem. 


I .. 57.53 


162.1 


6.22 


6.47 


290.00 


184 


Sem. 


II . 56.26 
Class of 1910: 


163.38 


6.48 


6.93 


290.12 


186 


Sem. 


I . . 54.49 


161.44 


6.00 


6.14 


275.5 


188 


Sem. 


II . 57.50 
Class of 1911: 


161.34 


6.42 


6.24 


282.57 


180.9 


Sem. 


I . . 58.78 


162.52 


6.01 


6.14 


276.00 


187 


Sem. 


II . 57.68 
Class of 1912 


162.05 


6.52 


6.55 


284.81 


187 


Sem. 


I . . 55.63 


160.81 


5.92 


5.96 


254.00 


177 


Sem. 


II . 57.07 


161.01 


6.02 


5.97 


279.23 


182.17 



59 



Table showing strength tests at first' and second physical 
examinations, according to classes : 



Number of Students. 



Semester I. 



Semester II. 





Tests. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912 


Above 


400 kg. 


3 


1 


2 





q 


2 


1 


1 




350 " 


6 


4 


3 


1 


5 


5 


5 


8 




325 " 


12 


4 


7 


3 


5 


3 


7 


10 




300 " 


10 


9 


12 


8 


13 


12 


15 


6 


Average 


275 " 


12 


10 


11 


15 


10 


12 


12 


18 




250 " 


21 


14 


17 


26 


21 


12 


16 


23 




225 " 


9 


14 


11 


20 


11 


10 


12 


16 




200 " 


5 


5 


7 


12 


5 


6 


7 


9 




175 " 


3 


2 


5 


4 





1 


1 


1 




150 " 











3 















Table showing lung capacity at first and second physical 
examinations, according to classes : 

Number of Students. 





Semester 


I. 








Semester II. 






Tests. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1909 


1910. 


1911. 


1912 


Above 


220 eu. in. 6 


1 


5 


4 


5 


4 


9 


6 




210 " ' 


' 6 


2 


9 


5 


6 


3 


10 


7 




200 " ' 


7 


6 


9 


7 


9 


9 


8 


7 




190 " ' 


' 10 


17 


13 


14 


10 


4 


9 


15 


Average 


180 " ' 


' 16 


9 


6 


13 


11 


15 


11 


14 




170 " ' 


' 13 


4 


16 


17 


14 


7 


11 


14 




160 " ' 


' 12 


10 


11 


13 


11 


8 


13 


10 




150 " ' 


' 5 


8 


2 


6 


3 


9 


3 


11 




140 " ' 


' 4 


5 


3 


7 


4 


2 


2 


3 




130 " ' 


' 1 





1 


2 











2 




120 " ' 


' 3 


1 


O 


3 





2 





2 




110 " ' 


' 1 








1 











1 



The three highest and lowest tests in strength and lung- 
capacity were : 







Strength 


Tests. 




Semester 


i. 




Semester 


ii. 


Highest. 


Lowest. 


Highest. 


Lowest. 


434 kg. 


186 


kg. 


502 kg. 


195 kg. 


418 kg. 


180 


kg. 


472.5 kg. 


189.5 kg. 


408 kg. 


165 


kg. 


464 kg. 


182.5 kg. 



60 



Lung Capacity. 

265 cu. in. 123 cu. in. 278 cu. in. 125 cu. in. 

246 cu. in. 120 cu. in. 260 cu. in. 120 cu. in. 

239 cu. in. 110 cu. in. 248 cu. in. 118 cu. in. 



Table showing number of physical defects noted for 
treatment : 

Number 
Diagnosis. of cases. Treatment. 

Simple scoliosis (left) .. 52... Special exercises. 
Simple scoliosis (right) . 9 ... Special exercises. 
Simple scoliosis (right) . 92. . .Special exercises. 

Double scoliosis 11 ... 8 special exercises, 

3 under Orthopedic 
specialist. 

Lordosis 4. . . None. 

Extreme kyphosis 1 . . . None. 

General weakness and 

faulty posture 11. . . Special exercises. 

Constipation 2 . . . Special exercises. 

Weak chest 10 . . . Special exercises. 

High hip 1 . . . Special exercises. 

Flat foot, breaking arch 

or pronation 34 . . 34 special exercises. 

20 referred to physician. 
16 fitted with plates. 

Varicose veins 1 . . . Under Osteopath. 

Enlarged thyroid 2. . .None. 

Medical Examinations. 

Two hundred and ninety-eight students were examined 
by the college physicians as to the condition of the heart and 
lungs, with the following results : 

Normal 266,. .No restrictions in athletics 

or gymnastics. 

Cardiac murmurs ... 13. .Gymnastic and athletic 

work regulated to suit 
condition. 



61 



Slight cardiac irregu- 
larity 15 

General debility .... 3 

Asthma 1 

Gymnasium Report. 

The new building was not opened until February 2 2nd, 
1909, so that gymnastic classes were held during five weeks 
only of the college year. Before the building was ready for 
use, outdoor drills were held when the weather permitted, 
and small fencing classes were conducted in the basement of 
Rockefeller Hall. 

The class of 1912 raised $800 for leaded glass windows 
for the new gymnasium. 

An informal contest between the Freshmen and Sopho- 
more classes took place on April 2nd, in marching tactics, 
barbells, Indian clubs and heavy apparatus. This was won by 
the class of 1911 by 59^/2 points out of a possible 70, as 
follows : 

1911. 1912. 

Points. Points. 

Marching tactics 8 6 

Indian clubs 8% 8y 2 

Heavy apparatus 43 36 

Total 5914 5014 



Excused from Gymnastic classes : 

Number of 
Students. Time. Cause. 



1. 

5. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 



. . February, March Internal strain. 

. . February, March Pelvic disorder. 

. . February, March Philibitis. 

. . February, March Operation on feet. 

. .February, March Dislocated knee. 

. . February, March General debility. 

. .February, March Rheumatism. 

. .February, March Kidney trouble. 



62 

Freshmen and Sophomores excused the heavier gym- 
nastic "work, substituting an equal number of periods of 
lighter work : 

Number. Time. Cause. 

. 1 . . . . February, March Varicose veins. 

1 . . . .February, March Defective circulation. 

1 . . . . February, March Broken arch of feet. 

1 . . . . February, March Dislocated knee. 

2 . . . . February, March Excessive menses. 

1 . . . . February, March Pelvic disorder. 

Three hundred and twenty-eight students registered exer- 
cise, seventy-two had occasional excuses from exercise, two 
hundred and fifty-six had no excuse from exercise. 

Number of 
Causes of excuses from exercise. students excused. 

Abscess in ear 1 

Appendicial colic 1 

Appendicitis (threatened) 1 

Biliousness 2 

Bronchitis 3 

Broken arch of foot 1 

Bruised knee 1 

Burnt hand (steam) 2 

Cold 7 

Dysentery 1 

Excessive menses 2 

Exposed to scarlet fever 1 

Grippe 13 

Illness at home 6 

Jaundice 1 

Laryngitis 1 

Menorrhagia 2 

Nervous exhaustion 8 

Neuralgia 1 

ISTeuritis 1 

ISTose bleed (excessive) 1 

Para-typhoid 1 



63 

Number of 
Causes of excuses from exercise. students excused. 

Pink eye 2 

Pleurisy 1 

Quinsy 1 

Recovery from operation 2 

Sprain, ankle 4 

foot 1 

knee 6 

Sunstroke 1 

Tonsilitis 6 

Toothache 1 

Typhoid fever 1 

Vaccine infection 1 

Fines. 

Five students failed to keep their physical appointments 
within the specified time, one student failed to keep a subse- 
quent appointment, eight students failed to register the 
required number of drills, twelve students failed to register 
the required number of periods of exercise. The fines were 
as f ollows : 

Physical appointments $12.00 

Drills 48.00 

Exercise 25.50 

Total $85.50 

A new vaulting horse, a giant stride, and two pairs of 
rings were presented to the gymnasium. Eight ropes and 
.new mattresses were purchased from the fines. 

Athletics. 
Calendar of Athletics for the Year 1908-09. 

September 30th — Hockey practice began. 
October 6th — First Athletic Association meeting held. 
October 15th — Tennis tournament began. 
October 15th — Laying of cornerstone of new Gym- 
nasium. 



64 

October 24th — Varsity hockey practice began. 
November 4th — Hockey matches began. 
November 13th — Second team hockey matches began. 
February 2 2nd — Opening of new Gymnasium. 
. March 13th — Track Meet. Preliminaries. 
March 26th — Track Meet. Finals. 
April 5th — Basket-ball practice began. 
April 16th — Swimming Meet. Preliminaries. 
April 24th — Swimming Meet. Finals. 
May 3rd — Basket-ball matches began. 
May 3rd — Varsity Tennis vs. Merion Cricket Club. 
June 1st — Varsity Tennis vs. Alumnae. 
June 2nd — Varsity Basket-ball vs. Alumnae. 

Athletic Statistics. 
Percentage of resident students taking part in athletics. 

Basket Authorised Water 

Ball. Hockey. Swimming. Polo. Tennis. Track. 

Class 1909 39 61 48 14 90 12. 

1910 45 73 54 14 91 14 

1911 .39 76 51 15 84 12 

1912 45 86 44 14 89 24 

College 42 74 49 14 88 16 

Percentage of resident students taking no part in 
athletics. 

Class 1909 3 

1910 2 

1911 1 

1912 1 

College 2 

Tennis. — The Class Championship was won by 1909. 
The College Championship was won by 1909 also. The cap- 
tains were: M. Belleville, 1909 ; E. Swift, 1910 ; M. Kilner, 
1911 ; E. Faries, 1912. 

Hockey. — The Class Championship was won by 1910. 
The captains were: M. Nearing, 1909; M; Kirk, 1910; L. 



65 

Hough teling, 1911 ; K. Costelloe, 1912. Each class had one 
first and one second team, with substitutes. First and sec- 
ond interclass matches were played. From 100 to 110 
students practiced daily during the season. 

Swimming. — The Class Championship was won by 1909. 
The captains were: G. Biddle, 1909; I. Taber, 1910; D. 
Coffin, 1911; E. Faries, 1912. The events at the contest 
were as follows : 

70 ft. swim on front, 18 s. 

69 ft. swim on back, 21% s. 
Plung-e for distance, 47 ft. 9 in. 
Swim under water, 117 ft. 3 in. 
140 ft. swim on front, 46% s. 
139 ft. swim on back, 48 s. 
Class relay race. 

Fancy dive. 
Dive for form. 

Three records were broken : 

70 ft. swim on front. 
Plunge for distance. 
Swim under water. 

One hundred and forty-one students were authorised as 
expert swimmers, sixty-four students took swimming lessons, 
twenty-seven students entered the contest. 

Water Polo. — The Class Championship was won by 1910. 
Each class had one first team, with substitutes. 

Track Athletics. — The Class Championship was won by 
1909. The Individual Championship was won by H. Emer- 
son, 1911. The events were : 

20 yd. dash. 

Hurdle race. 

22 ft. rope climb, 9% s. 

Running high jump, 4 ft. 3 in. 

Standing high jump, 3 ft. 5 in. 

Putting the shot, 26 ft. 11 in. 



66 

Tug-of-war. 

Standing broad jump, 7 ft. 4 in. 
Standing hop, step, jump, 21 ft. 6 in. 
Three broad jumps, 22 ft. !/4 in. 
Running vault, 4 ft. 9l/o in. 
Ring high jump, 6 ft. 8 in. 
Class relay race. 
College records broken : 
Rope climb, 9% s. 
Standing hop, step, jump, 21 ft. 6 in. 

The class captains were: K. Ecob, 1909; K. Kelley, 
1910 ; H. Emerson, 1911 ; M. W. Brown, 1912. Forty-seven 
students entered the meet. 

Basket-ball. — The Class Championship was won by 1909. 
The captains were: A. Piatt, 1909; F. Hearne, 1910; J. 
Allen, 1911; W. Scripture, 1912. From seventy to eighty 
students practiced daily during the season. Each class had 
one first and one second team, with substitutes. First and 
second interclass matches were played. 



Accidents : 




9 knees injured: 


4 in athletics. 

5 general accidents. 


8 strained ankles : 


3 athletics. 




1 gymnastics. 
4 walking. 


3 severe bruises: 


3 athletics. 


2 recovered. 




1 abscess on tibia. 




2 deflected nasal septums : 


1 athletics. 

1 general accidents. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Constance M. K. Appeebee, 
Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 



67 



Report of the Attending Physician. 

To the President: Madam, 

As a summary of the work done during the college year 
1908-09 I make the following report: 

Cases Treated. 
Medical : 

Tonsilitis 10 

Severe general colds 7 

Bronchial colds 5 

Influenza 3 

Bronchitis 3 

Laryngitis 3 

Moderate colds 8 

Neurasthenia 1 

Neurasthenia with mild delusions 1 

Dermatitis (probably chemical) 1 

Mucous colitis 1 

Choleo-cystitis 1 

Indigestion 1 

Jaundice 1 

Angemia 1 

Neuralgia 2 

Sub-acute nephritis 1 

Ivy poisoning 1 

Chronic Bronchitis 1 

Chronic catarrhal appendicitis. Advised 

operation between attacks 1 

■ 53 

SUEGICAL : 

Sprain of knee 3 

Sprain of ankle 2 

Fractured noses 4 



68 



Sub-periosteal hemorrhage over tibia 1 

Synovitis of knee 4 

Sprain of flexor tendons 1 

Laceration of leg 1 

Cellulitis of external auditory canals 1 

Dysmenorrhea and Endometritis. Operation 1 

Sinusitis 1 

Facial swelling 1 

Catarrhal appendicitis. Operation 1 

Removal of needle from elbow. Located by 

X-Ray 1 



22 



75 

The college is to be congratulated on the absence of any 
of the so-called contagious diseases during the entire year. 
We may also note with satisfaction that only ten cases of 
tonsilitis and three of influenza appear on the list — an evi- 
dence that prompt isolation and disinfection are bearing good 
fruit. 

The small number of casualties in a college of over four 
hundred athletic young women proves very conclusively the 
very careful selection of healthy and normal candidates. 

It would be a great satisfaction and comfort to the 
medical staff to feel that a new infirmary was in the course of 
erection. Such happy and healthy conditions as have existed 
in the past year can scarcely be expected in a growing com- 
munity so closely associated with the pleasures and engage- 
ments of a large city and in constant communication with it. 
Our facilities for managing contagion are very limited and 
I would urge upon your board prompt action in providing 
suitable accommodations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Branson, 

Attending Physician. 



69 



Report of the Visiting Physician of the College. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to submit the following report for the 
year 1908-09 : 

I. During the college year, October, 1908, to June 1, 
1909, twenty-four patients were cared for in the infirmary 
building. The total number of days' care amounted to one 
hundred and forty-seven, and the number of cases requiring 
isolation was fortunately considerably smaller than that of 
the previous year. 

The classification of Infirmary Cases is as follows : 

Abrasions 2 

Adenitis 1 

Appendicitis 1 

Appendiceal colic 1 

Conjunctivitis 1 

Contusion 1 

Coryza 3 

Dermatitis venanata 1 

Dysmenorrhea 1 

Enteritis, catarrhal 1 

Exhaustion, general 1 

Influenza 3 

]STervous exhaustion 2 

Parotiditis 1 

Rheumatism : 1 

Sprains 2 

Tonsilitis 3 

Varicella 1 

Total 24 



70 

II. The report of the work in office and dormitories is 
as follows : 

Physical examinations 362 

Number of students' visits to office 271 

Number of visits to students confined to their rooms or 

the infirmary 32 

Vaccinations 78 

Total number of consultations 743 

III. Tabulation of conditions treated. 

Medical and Surgical : 

Acne 2 

Adenitis ' 1 

Allopecia 1 

Anaemia 1 

Appendicial colic 1 

Bronchitis 4 

Conjunctivitis 2 

Contusions 3 

Coryza 10 

Flat foot 2 

Indigestion, gastric 3 

Indigestion, intestinal 1 

Influenza 2 

Insomnia 3 

Laryngitis 3 

Nervous exhaustion 6 

Pharyngitis 4 

Rheumatism, muscular 1 

Sprain 2 

Strain, muscular 2 

Tonsilitis 3 

Tracheitis 2 

Gynaecological : 

Displacement of the uterus 2 



71 

Menstrual Disorders : 

Amenorrhea 4 

Dsymenorrhea 6 

Menorrhagia 2 

IV. Tabulation of students by classes (exclusive of- 
physical examinations and vaccinations) : 

Graduates 20 

Seniors 14 

Juniors 16 

Sophomores 29 

Freshmen , 30 

Total 109 

V. Comparatively few visits by nurses to students in 
their rooms were necessary during the year, owing to the fact 
that much nursing attention was given in the offices of the 
physicians in Merion Hall, these rooms being utilized some- 
what as a dispensary for walking cases. The results were a 
marked saving of the nurses' time and labor, and increased 
efficiency of the service. 

VI. The arrangement for daily consultation hours made 
possible by having an assistant physician apparently has been 
an advantage in the way of prevention. The opportunity to 
secure professional advice promptly seems to have resulted in 
arresting some cases of illness in their incipiency, and the 
general health record of the college for the year is conse- 
quently better than the average. Another step in advance pos- 
sible because of additional assistance in the department is the 
physical examination of all students at least once a year, and 
in many instances oftener. This plan enables the college to 
have more definite knowledge of the physical condition of any 
student throughout her course, and unhealthy processes are 
far less likely to develop undiscovered. 

The continued use of the offices in Merion Hall has 



72 

greatly facilitated the medical work, but the inadequacy of 
the infirmary still makes the care of bed cases a difficult 
problem. 

In closing my seventh and last year of service as Visiting 
Physician to the College, I wish to express my appreciation of 
the cordial support and co-operation of all with whom I have 
been associated officially. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ella B. Everitt,, 
Visiting Physician. 



73 



Appendices. 



Promotions, Reappointments, and Changes in the Academic 
and Administrative Staff for the Year 1909-10. 

Lucien Foulet, Professor of French Literature, resigned to accept 
the Professorship of French Language and Literature in the Uni- 
versity of California. 

William Bashford Huff, Ph.D., promoted to be Professor of Physics. 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, A.B., Associate Professor of English, 
returned after one year's leave of absence. 

Clarence Carroll Clark, Ph.D., reappointed Associate Professor of 
English. 

Karl Detlev Jessen, Ph.D., reappointed Associate Professor of Ger- 
man Literature. 

Tenney Frank, Ph.D., reappointed Associate Professor of Latin. 

Nettie Maria Stevens, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Morphology, 
returned after one year's leave of absence. 

Caroline Louise Ransom, Ph.D., Associate in the History of Art and 
the Classical Archaeology, returned after one semester's leave of 
absence and promoted to be Associate Professor of the History 
of Art and Classical Archaeology. 

Charles Clarence Williamson, Ph.D., reappointed Associate in 
Economics and Politics. 

George Shannon Forbes, Ph.D., Associate in Chemistry, term expired. 

Hans Weyhe, Ph.D., reappointed Associate in Teutonic Philology 
and Sanskrit. 

Frederick Hutton Getman, Ph.D., appointed Associate in Chemistry. 
Dr. Getman was a student of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Insti- 
tute from 1893 to 1896, of the University of Virginia from 1896 
to 1897. He held a fellowship in Chemistry in Johns Hopkins 
University from 1902 to 1903, and a fellowship by courtesy from 



74 

1903 to 1904. He received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
from Johns Hopkins University in 1903, and was Carnegie Re- 
search Assistant in Physical Chemistry from 1903 to 1904. He 
was Lecturer in Physical Chemistry in the College of the City of 
New York from 1904 to 1905, and was Lecturer in Physics at 
Columbia University from 1907 to 1908. 

M. Phillips Mason, Ph.D., appointed Associate in Philosophy. Dr. 
Mason graduated from Harvard University, taking the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1899, the degree of Master of Arts in 1900, 
and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1904. He was a stu- 
dent of Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford, from 1899 
to 1900; studied at the University of Heidelberg and Berlin from 
1900 to 1901 ; at the University of Marburg from 1901 to 1902, at 
the Sorbonne and College de France in 1902, and at Harvard 
University from 1902 to 1904. He was Instructor in Philosophy 
at Princeton University from 1905 to 1907. 

Clarence Errol Ferree, Ph.D.,. promoted to be Associate in Experi- 
mental Psychology. 

Marion Reilly, A.B., reappointed Dean of the College and Reader in 
Philosophy. 

Orie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., reappointed Lecturer in Elizabethan 
Literature. 

Frederick A. Blossom. A.B., appointed Lecturer in French. Mr. 
Blossom received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Amherst 
College in 1898. He was a student of Romance Languages in 
Johns Hopkins University from 1903 to 1904 ; in Paris and Gren- 
oble from 1905 to 1908 and again in Johns Hopkins University in 
1909. 

Rose Chamberlin, M.A., reappointed Reader in German. 

Harriet Randolph. Ph.D., reappointed Demonstrator in Biology and 
Reader in Botany. 

Katharine Fullerton, A.M., reappointed Reader in English, returned 
after one year's leave of absence. 

Regina Katharine Crandall, Ph.D., reappointed Reader in English. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., reappointed Reader in English. 

Abby Kirk, A.B., reappointed Reader in Elementary Greek. 

Helen Ward, A.B., Reader in English, resigned. 

Maud Downing, A.B., reappointed Reader in Semitic Languages. 

Clara Leonora Nicolay, Ph.D., reappointed Reader in Elementary 
French. 



75 

Una McMahan. A.B., Reader and Demonstrator in the History of 
Art and Classical Archaeology, resigned. 

Lily Ross Taylor, A.B., Reader in Latin, resigned. 

Vikginia Ragsdale, Ph.D., reappointed Reader in Mathematics. 

Lillie Deming Loshe, Ph.D., reappointed Reader in English. 

Asa Russell Giffokd, A.M., Reader in Philosophy, resigned. 

Content Shepard Nichols, A.M., appointed Reader in English. Miss 
Nichols received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr 
College in 1899 and the degree of Master of Arts in 1900. She 
was a graduate scholar in Latin and English in Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege from 1899 to 1900 and Assistant Reader in English in Bryn 
Mawr College in 1900. She has since taught in the Bryn Mawr 
School in Baltimore and in the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr 
and has acted as a private tutor. 

Elizabeth Andros Foster, A.M., appointed Reader in Latin. Miss 
Foster received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr 
College in 1908 and the degree of Master of Arts in 1909 ; and 
was graduate scholar in Latin at Bryn Mawr College from 190aS 
to 1909. 

Frances Lowater, B.Sc, Ph.D., reappointed Demonstrator in 
Physics. 

Gertrude Langdon Heritage, A.M., reappointed Demonstrator in 
Chemistry. 

Caroline Vinia Lynch, A.M., appointed Demonstrator in the History 
of Art and Classical Archaeology. Miss Lynch graduated from 
Smith College in 1894 and received the degree of Master of Arts 
from Columbia University in 1908. She studied at the American 
School of Classical Studies in Rome from 1904 to 1905, in Colum- 
bia University from 1906 to 1907, and in Radcliffe College from 
1907 to 1909. 

Anna Bell Lawther, A.B., reappointed Secretary of the College. 

Ethel Walker, A.M., reappointed Recording Secretary and Appoint- 
ment Secretary. 

Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S., reappointed Librarian. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, reappointed Director of Athletics and 
Gymnastics. 

Elizabeth L. Gray, reappointed Assistant Director of Athletics and 
Gymnastics. 

Mary Ellen Baker, A.B., B.L.S., reappointed Head Cataloguer. 



76 

Bessie Homer Jennings, reappointed Assistant Cataloguer. 

Mary Warren Taylor, reappointed Secretary to the Director of 

Athletics and Gymnastics. 

Ella B. Everitt, M.D., resigned as Visiting Physician of the College 
and appointed Consultant Gynecologist. 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D.. reappointed Attending Physician of the 
College. 

Anne Heath Thomas, A.M., M.D., promoted to be Visiting Physician 
of the College. 

James G. Forrester. M.A., reappointed Comptroller. 

Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., reappointed Warden of Pembroke 
Halls East and West. 

Alice Anthony, A.B., reappointed Warden of Denbigh Hall. 

Virginia Tryon Stoddard, A.M., reappointed Warden of Radnor Hall. 

Harriet Jean Crawford, A.B., reappointed Warden of Rockefeller 
Hall. 

Bertha Margaret Laws, A.B., reappointed Assistant to the Warden 
of Pembroke Hall. 

Friedrika Margretha Heyl, A.B.. reappointed Warden of Merion 
Hall. 



77 



II. 

Fellowships and Scholarships Conferred for the Year 
1909-10. 

Margaket Bontecou, Bryn Mawr European Fellow. 

Orange, N. J. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Maria L. Eastman Brooke 
Hall Memorial Scholar, 1908-09. 

Maey Hamilton Swindler Mary E. Garrett European Fellow. 

Bloomington, Ind. A.B., University of Indiana, 1905, and A.M.. 1906. Grad- 
uate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Fellow in Greek, 
1907-09. 

Grace Potter Reynolds President's European Fellow. 

Stamford, Conn. A.B., Smith College, 1904 ; A.M.. Columbia University, 1905. 
Graduate Student, Columbia University, 1904-05 ; Assistant in Chemistry, 
Barnard College, 1906-08 ; Fellow in Chemistrv, Bryn Mawr College, 
1908-09. 

Esther Harmon, 

Ottendorfer Memorial Research Fellow in Teutonic Philology. 

Toledo, O. A.B.. University of Michigan, 1906. Graduate Scholar in Teu- 
tonic Philology, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07. Holder of the President's 
European Fellowship and Student, University of Berlin, 1907-08 ; Fellow in 
German and Teutonic Philology, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Helen Estabrook Sandison, Special European Fellow. 

Terre Haute. Ind. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1906, and A.M., 1907. Gradu- 
ate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Assistant Principal of the High 
School, Brookville, Ind., 1907-08 ; Fellow in English, Bryn Mawr College, 
1908-09. 

Margaret Sidner Dillon Special European Fellow. 

Radnor, Pa. A.B.. Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Maria L. Eastman Brooke Hall 
Memorial Scholar, 1908-09. 

Louise Baggott Morgan, Special European Scholar. 

Providence, R. I. A.B. and A.M., Brown University, 1907. Graduate Scholar 
in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-09. 

Rose Jeffries Peebles. Special European Scholar. 

Birmingham, Ala. A.B., Mississippi State College for Women, 1891. Univer- 
sity of Chicago, Summer, 1897, 1898, 1905 ; Harvard University, Summer, 
1902 ; Columbia University. Summer, 1903 ; Graduate Student in English, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Fellow in English, 1907-08, and Fellow by 
Courtesy and Graduate Scholar in English, 1908-09. 

Fannie Grace Clara Spencer Research Fellow in Chemistry. 

Terre Haute, Ind. A.B., University of Illinois, 1908, and A.M., 1909. 

Cornelia Catlin Coulter Felloiv in Latin. 

Fersuson, Mo. A.B., Washington University, 1907. Graduate Scholar in 
Latin. Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08 : Holder of the Presdenfs European 
Fellowship and Student, University of Munich, 1908-09. 

Eunice Clara Smith Fellow in English. 

Pawtucket, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1907, and A.M., 1909. 

Jane Annetta Harrison, Fellow in German. 

La Plata, Mo. A.B. and B.S.. Unversity of Missouri, 1906, and A.M., 1907. 
Graduate Student, University of Missouri, 1908-09. 



78 

Helen Maxwell King Fellow in Romance Languages. 

Olivet, Mich. A.B.. Olivet College, 1907, and A.M., 1908. Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Jane Cushing Shoemaker Fellow in Economics. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1905. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Marie Gertrude Rand Fellow in Philosophy. 

Brooklyn, New York City. A.B., Cornell University, 1908. Graduate Scholar 
in Psychology, 1908-09. 

Helen Cox Bowerman Fellow in Archaeology. 

Point Pleasant, N. J. A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1901 ; A.M., University 
of Rochester, 1903. Teacher of English and Latin in the High School, 
Macedon. N. Y., 1903-05 ; Instructor in Latin, Western College for Women, 
Oxford, O., 1905-07 ; Associate Professor of Latin, 1907-08 ; Graduate 
Scholar in Archaeology, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Eitla Adeline Weeks Fellow in Mathematics. 

Butler. Mo. A.B. and B.S., University of Missouri, 1908, and A.M., 1909. 
Teacher in the High School, Rich Hill, Mo., 1901-05. 

Mabel Kathryn Frehafer, Fellow in Physics. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Graduate Student in Physics, 
University of Wisconsin, 1908-09. 

Annie Louise Macleod, Fellow in Chemistry. 

Grace Bay. Nova Scotia. A.B., McGill University, 1904, and M.Sc, 1905. 
Demonstrator in Chemistry, McGill University, 1905-08 ; Assistant in 
Chemistry, Barnard College, 190S-09. 

May Mason Jarvis, Fellow in Biology. 

Austin, Tex. A.B.. University of Texas, 1906, and A.M., 1908. Tutor in 
Zoology, University of Texas, 1907-09. 

Isabella Mellis Massey, British Graduate Scholar. 

London, England. Girton College. University of Cambridge, 1905-09. Med- 
iaeval and Modern Languages Tripos, Class I, 190S, Class II, 1909. 

Elsie Gertrude May, British Graduate Scholar. 

Birmingham, England.- Mason College. Birmingham, 1893-97 ; St. Hugh's 
Hall. University of Oxford, 1897-99. Pinal Honours School of English 
Language and Literature, University of Oxford, 1899 : M.A., University of 
Birmingham. 1901. Teacher in the Pontvpool Conntv School. 1901-03, in 
the Blackburn High School, 1903-04, in the Worcester High School, 1904-08, 
and in the Streatham Hill High School, 1908-09. 

Margarete Emma Johanna Behrens, . . . .German Graduate Scholar. 

Dresden. Saxony. University of Munich, 1907-09 ; University of Jena, 1907 ; 
University of Kiel, 1909. 

Elna Gerlach, German Graduate Scholar. 

Bischofshurg, Prussia. University of Munich. 1906-09. 

Barbara Heffner German Graduate Scholar. 

Kitzingen. Bavaria. University of Wiirzburg, 1903-04, 1905-09 ; University 
of Munich, 1904-05 ; Ph.D., University of Wiirzhurg, 1907. 

Annalise Schmidt German Graduate Scholar. 

Munich, Bavaria. University of Berlin, 1905-06, 1907-08; University of 
Munich, 1906-07, 1908-09. 

Deborah Chase Akers. Graduate Scholar in Psychology. 

Decatur, 111. Western College, 1904-06 ; Milliken University, 1906 ; Univer- 
sity of Illinois, 1907-08 ; A.B., University of Illinois, 1908. 



79 

Maria Hawes Albee Graduate Scholar in Greek. 

Killingly, Conn. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904 ; Graduate Student in Greek 
and Archaeology, Yale University, 1904-05, and in Latin and Archaeology, 
1905-06 ; Instructor in German and History in the High School, New Haven, 
Conn., 1904-05, and in German and Latin, 1905-06, 1907-09 ; Head of the 
Classical Department and Assistant Principal, Tudor Hall, Indianapolis, 
Ind., 1906-07 ; Assistant in the Secretary's Office, Yale University, 1908-09. 

Edith Mary Allison, Graduate Scholar in Psychology. 

McPherson. Kan. Washburn Conegc. 1903-04. 1905 ; McPherson College, 
1906-07 ; University of Colorado, 1907-08 ; A.B., University of Colorado, 
1908, and A.M., 1909 ; Assistant in Biology, University of Colorado, 1908-09. 

Grace Sarah Taylor Barker, Graduate Scholar in Physics. 

Welland, Ontario. Canada. S.B., University of Chicago, 1907 ; Teacher in the 
University School for Girls, Chicago, 1907-09. 

Ethel Leigh Chubb Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

West Toronto, Canada. B.A., University of Toronto, 1906, and M.A., 1909 ; 
Lecturer in Westminster College, Toronto, 1906-09. 

Emily C. Crawford, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Montreal, Canada, A.B.. McGill University, 1907. Graduate Scholnr in 

Greek, Bryn Mawr College. 1907-08, and Graduate Scholar in Latin, 

1908-09. 

Margaret Sidner Dillin, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Radnor, Pa. A.B.. Bryn Mawr College, 1909. 

Louise Dudley European Graduate Scholar in English. 

Georgetown. Ky. A.B., Georgetown College, 1905. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1905-06 ; Teacher in Kemper Hall, Kenosha, Wis., 1908-09. 

Frances Allen Foster, Scholar in English. 

Providence, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1909. 

Eleanor James, , .Scholar in Latin. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Teacher in the Public School, 
Milford, Del., 1902-03, and in Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
1903-OS ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Helen Moore Johnson, Scholar in Greek. 

Osceola, Mo. Drury College, 1903-05 ; University of Missouri, 1905-08 ; 
Tulane University, 1908-09 ; A.B., University of Missouri, 1907, and A.M., 
1908. 

Helen Stieglitz Jurist, Scholar in German. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College. 1909. 

Michi Matsuda, Scholar in English. 

Tango. Japan. A.B.. Bryn Mawr College, 1899. Teacher in Kobe College, 
Kobe, Japan, 1899-1904. and in The Doshisha, Kyoto, Japan, 1904-08 ; 
Graduate Scholar in Economics, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Louise Baggott Morgan, Scholar in English. 

Providence, R. I. A.B. and A.M., Brown University, 1907. Graduate Scholar 
in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-09. 

Helen Hawley Nichols, Scholar in Semitic Languages. 

Marietta, O. A.B., Marietta College, 1906. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 

College, 1906-07, and Graduate Scholar in Semitic Languages, 1907-08 ; 

Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, and Student, Univer- 
sity of Oxford, 1908-09. 

Ellen Seton Ogden, Scholar in Semitic Languages. 

Albany, N. Y. L.B., University of Nashville, 1895. Teacher of Latin and 
Mathematics in the Winthrop Model School, Peabody Normal College, 1895- 
96 ; Graduate Student in Teutonic Philology and Semitic Languages, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1896-98 ; Junior Bursar, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-1901 ; 



80 

Student in Semitics, Columbia University, 1901-02 ; Head of the English 
Department, St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y., 1902-09, and Instructor in 
Biblical Study, 1904-09. 

Adah Blanche Roe, Scholar in German. 

Omaha, Neb. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1909. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, Scholar in French. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Eleanor Sheldon, Scholar in English. 

Minneapolis, Minn. A.B., University of Minnesota, 1904, and A.M., 1909. 
Assistant in English, University of Minnesota, 1905-09 ; Teacher of Inter- 
pretative Literature in tbe Minneapolis School of Music and Oratory, 
1906-09. 

Mary Caroline Spalding, Scholar in English. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. A.B., Vassar College, 1901. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1906-08, and Graduate Scholar, 1908-09 ; Teacher in the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1906-09. 

Helen Beardsley Cromwell White, Scholar in Geology. 

Bradford, Pa. A.B., Allegheny College, 1909. 

Jessie Hester Coleman, Perm College Scholar. 

Oskaloosa, la. Ph.B., Penn College, 1909. 

Margaret Davis, Guilford College Scholar. 

Guilford College, N. C. A.B., Guilford College, 1909. 

Marcia Moore Furnas Earlham College Scholar. 

Earlham, Ind. A.B., Earlham College, 1906. 

Anna Hartshorne, Foundation Scholar. 

Brighton, Md. Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. 
Foundation Scholar, 1908-09. 

Alpine Bodine Parker, Foundation Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Founda- 
tion Scholar, 1907-09. 

Elizabeth Taylor Shipley, Foundation Scholar. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mary Boyd Shipley Foundation Scholar. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared bv the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Foundation Scholar, 1906-09. 

Dorothy Turner Blake, 

First New England States Matriculation Scholar. 
Boston, Mass. Prepared by Miss Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston. 
Ruth Coe Manchester, 

Second New England States Matriculation Scholar. 
Winsted, Conn. Prepared by the Gilbert High School, Winsted. 
Florence Maud Dessau, 

First New York and Neiv Jersey Matriculation Scholar. 
New York City. Prepared by the Gordon-Winston School, New York City. 
Nathalie Swift, 

Second New York and New Jersey Matriculation Scholar. 
New York City. Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. 
Marion Dorothea Clinton, 

First Western States Matriculation Scholar. 
Portland, Ore. Prepared by Portland Academy, Portland. 



81 

Maud Wislizenus Holmes, 

Second Western States Matriculation Scholar. 
St. Louis, Mo. Prepared by the Mary Institute, St. Louis. 

Ramona Beatrice Miller, 

First Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of Simon Muhr Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Alice Dudley Patterson, 

Second Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Grace Bartholomew, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 
Sadie Beliekowsky, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School. Philadelphia. Holder of 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1908-09. 

Helen Muller Bley, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School. Philadelphia. Holder of 
the First (equal) Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania 
and the Southern States, and of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School 
Scholarship, 1906-09. 

Angela Darkow, . .Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
First Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 
1907-08, and of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 
1907-09 ; Holder of the Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholarship, 1908-09. 

Anna Constance Heffern, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1908-09. 

Agnes Miller Irwin, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1906-09. 

Ellen Esther Pottberg, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared bv the Girls' High School. Philadelphia. Holder of 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1907-09. 

Adelaide Douglas Simpson. 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Caroline Letchworth Justice, 

Trustees' Lower Merion High School Scholar. 

Narberth, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School. Ardmore, Pa. 
Holder of the Trustees' Lower Merion High School Scholarship, 1907-09. 

Marion Delia Crane, James E. Rhoads' Junior Scholar. 

Providence, R. I. Prepared by the High School. Abington, Mass., and by 
private tuition. Holder of the James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 
1908-09. 

Pauline Ida Clarke, James E. Rhoads' Sophomore Scholar. 

New York City. Prepared by the Balliol School, Utica, N. Y. 



82 

Norah Cam Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar. 

Bishop's Stortford, England. Prepared by private tuition. 

Gertrude Marie Elcock, Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar. 

Glenside, Pa. Prepared by the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. 

Katharine Forbes Liddell Maria Hopper Special Scholar. 

Charlotte, N. C. Prepared by the Calhoun-Chamberlain School, Montgomery, 

Ala. Holder of James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship, 1908-09. 
Anne Russell Sampson, Maria Hopper Special Scholar. 

Charlottesville, Va. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md., by 
the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., by the Westminster School, Rich- 
mond, Va., and by private tuition. 

Agnes Laurence Murray Mary E. Stevens Junior Scholar. 

Delhi, N. Y. Prepared by St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y. Holder of Maria 
Hopper Sophomore Scholarship, 1908-09. 

Helen Muller Bley, 

Maria L. Eastman Brooke Hall Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
the First (equal) Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania 
and the Southern States, and of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School 
Scholarship, 1906-09. 

Margaret Adelaide Munroe, L. G. B. Saul Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Hilpa Serena Schram, Elisabeth Duane Gillespie Scholar. 

Columbia, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr. Pa. 

Pearl Boring Mitchell, 

Minnie Murdoch Kendrick Memorial Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 
Ruth Collins Anna M. Powers Memorial Scholar. 

Pitman Grove, N. J. Prepared by the Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, and by 
private tuition. 

Emma Forster, Anna M. Powers Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1907-09. 

Ann Catherine Arthurs, Bryn Mawr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared bv the Brvn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1908-09. 

Rebecca Renshaw Lewis. Bryn Mawr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1908-09. 

Mary Van Arsdale Tongue Bryn Mawr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Margaret Junkin Preston Bryn Mawr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared bv the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1908-09. 

Ramona Beatrice Miller Simon Muhr Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Cecelia Irene Baeghle Gity Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Emily Edna Caskey, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1907-09. 



83 

Julia Chickering City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1907-09. 

Jessie Williams Clifton, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1907-09. 

Emma Forster, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School. Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1907-09. 

Cecile Adler Goldsmith, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Sara Marion Halpen City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Lillie James, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1906-09. 

Marion Shelmire Kirk, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1906-09 ; Holder of Maria Hopper Scholarship,. 1907-08. 

Mary Ethel Ladd, City Sch olar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1906-09 ; Holder of the Mary E. Stevens Scholarship. 
18108-09. 

Margaret Adelaide Munroe, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Dorothy Nearing, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1906-09. 

Mary Longacre Root, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1906-09. 

Lorle Ida Stecher, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Manual Training High School, Indianapolis, 
Ind., and by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1908-09. 

Mary Boyde Wesner, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1906-09. 

Shirley Putnam, 

George W. Child's Prise Essayist and Mary Helen Ritchie Memo- 
rial Prise. 
Washington, D. C. Prepared by Miss Ingol's School, Cambridge. Mass. 



84 



III. 

Degrees Conferred during the Academic Year 1908-09. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 

2 

Carrie Anna Harper, of Massachusetts. 

A.B., Radcliffe College. 1S96, and A.M., 1898. Graduate Scholar in English, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1S96-97, and Fellow in English, 1898-99 ; Graduate 
Student in English. Radcliffe College, 1897-98, 1906-07 ; Teacher of Eng- 
lish in the Gilman School, Cambridge, Mass., 1899-1907 ; Instructor in Eng- 
lish Literature, Mt. Holyoke College, 1907-09. Subjects : English Language, 
English Literature, and Spanish. Thesis : The Sources of British Chronicle 
History in Spenser's "Faerie Queene." 

Gertrud Charlotte Schmidt, of Massachusetts. 

B.L., University of Wisconsin, 1900. Graduate Student, Radcliffe College, 
1900-01, 1902-03 ; A.M., Radcliffe College, 1903 ; Assistant in German, 
Smith College, 1901-02 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, and Teacher 
of German in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1903-05, 1906-09 ; 
Holder of the President's European Fellowship and Student. University of 
Leinsic, 1905-06, University of Grenoble. Summer, 1905. Subjects : Teutonic 
Philology, German Literature, and Sanskrit. Thesis : Die Deminutiva im 
Mittelniederdeutschen und im Mittelniederlandischen. 

MASTER OF ARTS. 

3 

Elizabeth Andros Foster, of Massachusetts. 

A..B.. Bryn M'awr College, 1908. Graduate Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1908-09. 

Eleanor Ferguson Rambo, of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Graduate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1908-09. 

Virginia Tryon Stoddard, of New Jersey. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903. Warden of Radnor Hall and Graduate Stu- 
dent, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-09. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 
70 

Tracy Dickinson Mygatt, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Misses Graham's School. New York City, and by private 
tuition. Group : Latin and English. Work for degree completed in Feb- 
ruary, 1909. 

Fannie May Witherspoon, of Mississippi. 

Prepared by the Misses Kirk's School. Rosemont, Pa., and by private tuition. 
Group : Latin and English. Work for degree completed in February, 1909. 

Martha Getz Boyer, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Reading, Pa. Teacher of Mathematics 
in the Girls' High School, Reading, 1902-07. Group : Mathematics and 
Chemistry. Work for degree completed in March, 1909. 



85 

Edith Adair, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of the James E. 
Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 1906-07, and of City Scholarship, 1905-09. 

Pleasaunce Baker, of Florida. 

Prepared by the Pennsylvania College for Women and by private tuition. 
Group : Chemistry and Biology. 

Fannie Skeer Barber, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the High School, Mauch Chunk, Pa., and by the National Cathe- 
dral School, Washington, D. C. Group : Latin and German. 

Mary Eleanor Bartholomew, of Chicago. 

Prepared by the Lakeview High School, Chicago, by the Pratt Institute High 
School, Brooklyn, New York City, and by private tuition. Group : Latin and 
English. 

Marie Elizabeth Belleville, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Central High School, Pittsburgh, Pa. Group : Mathematics 
and Physics. 

Margaret Bontecou, of New Jersey. 

Prepared by Miss Beard's School, Orange, N. J. Holder of the Maria L. East- 
man Brooke Hall Memorial Scholarship, 1908-09. Group : History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Judith McCutcheon Boyer, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the High School, Pottsville, Pa., and by Miss Wright's School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. Holder of the Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Scholarship in 
American History, 190S-09. Group : History and Economics and Politics. 

Katharine Fleming Branson, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the High School. Coatesville, Pa., by the Misses Shipley's School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. Group : Latin and Mathematics. 

Helen Dalton Brown, of Chicago. 

Prepared by the Convent of the Sacred Heart, by the University High School, 
Chicago, and by private tuition. Group : Latin and German. 

Frances Browne, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. Group : Greek and Philosophy. 

Jessie Williams Clieton, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1907-09. Group : Greek and Latin. 

Gertrude Congdon, of Illinois. 

Prepared by the High School, Evanston, 111. Northwestern University, 1904- 
05. Group : Latin and Mathematics. 

Helen Bond Crane, of Baltimore. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md., and by private tuition. 
Group : Latin and French. 

Margaret Sidner Dillin, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the High School, Radnor, Pa. Holder of the Maria L. Eastman 
Brooke Hall Memorial Scholarship, 1908-09. Group: Latin and German. 

Julia Adrienne Doe, of Wisconsin. 

Prepared by Milwaukee-Downer College. Group : Greek and Mathematics. 

Elise Donaldson, of Maryland. 

Prepared by Flushing Seminary, Flushing, N. Y. Holder of Maria Hopper 

Scholarship, 1906-07 ; Holder of Mary E. Stevens Scholarship, 1907-08. 

Group : Latin and English. 

Helen Dudley, of Chicago. 

Prepared by Dearborn Seminary, Chicago, 111. University of Chicago, 
1903-04 ; University of Oxford, 190S-09. Group : Greek and Philosophy. 



86 

Mildred Pauline Durand, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the George School, George School, Pa. Group : Latin and English. 

Katharine Gilbert Ecob, of Long Island. 

Prepared by Miss Case and Miss Child's School and by Miss Child's College 
Preparatory Classes, Philadelphia. Group : Chemistry and Biology. 

Bertha Sophie Bhlers, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of the First Matric- 
ulation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1905-06 ; 
Holder of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1905-09. 
Group : Latin and German. 

Helen Turnbull Gilroy, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the High School, Bast Orange, N. J., and by Miss Keyser's School, 
Philadelphia. Holder of the Anna M. Powers Memorial Scholarship, 1908-09. 
Group : Mathematics and Physics. 

Jessie Jay Gilroy, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of the L. C. B. Saul 
Memorial Scholarship, 1905-09. Group : Greek and French. 

Agnes Goldman, of New York City. 

Prepared by Dr. J. Sachs's School for Girls, New York City. Group : Mathe- 
matics and Physics. 

Mary Merrick Goodwin, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School. Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1905-09. Group : History and Economics and Politics. 

Anna Elizabeth Harlan, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by Miss Florence Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group : Eng- 
lish and French. 

Antoinette Claypoole Hearne, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Radnor High School, Wayne, Pa., by the Misses Shipley's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. Group : German and 

Spanish. 

Mary Emma Herr, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Misses Kirk's School, Rosemont, Pa. Group : Greek and Eng- 
lish. 

Mary Early Holliday, of Indiana. 

Prepared by the Shortridge High School, Indianapolis. Ind., and by Rosemary 
Hall, Greenwich, Conn. Group : History and Economics and Politics. 

Julia McHenry Howard, of Baltimore, Md. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md., and by private tuition. 
Group : English and French. 

Margaret Elizabeth Hudson, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1905-09. Group : Latin and French. 

Sarah Jacobs, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by Miss Sergeant and Miss Bent's School, Harrisburg, Pa. Group : 
History and Economics and Politics. 

Helen Stieglitz Jurist, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia, and by private tuition. 
Group : English and German. 

Olive Minard Kelley, of New York. 

Prepared by the High School. Port Jervis, N. Y., and by the Misses Shipley's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group : Latin and French. 

Leona Sophie Labold, of Ohio. 

Prepared by Miss Mary E. Stevens, Germantown, Philadelphia. Group : 
English and French. 



87 

Lilian J. Laser, of Arkansas. 

Prepared by the High School, Hot Springs, Ark., and by private tuition. 
Group : English and French. 

Rose Guthrie Marsh, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Alinda Preparatory School, Pittsburgh, Pa., by Miss Brown's 
School, Yonkers, N. Y., and by Miss Mary B. Stevens, Germantown, Phila- 
delphia. Group : History and Economics and Politics. 

Ethel Mattson, of Nebraska. 

Prepared by the Moorestown Friends' Academy, Moorestown, N. .7., and by 
the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group : Chemistry and 
Biology. 

Dorothy Elizabeth Miller, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by St. Mary's School, Concord. N. H., and by the Misses Shipley's 
School, Bryn Mawr Pa. Group : History and Economics and Politics. 

Eugenia Blow Mtltenberger, of Missouri. 

Prepared by Mary Institute, St. Louis, Mo. Holder of the Elizabeth Duane 
Gillespie Scholarship in American History, 1908-09. Group : History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Caroline Minor, of Virginia. 

Prepared by Miss Ellett's School, Richmond, Va. Holder of Special Scholar- 
ship, 1907-08. Group : Latin and English. 

Marianne Craig Moore, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Metzger Institute, Carlisle, Pa. Group : History and Eco- 
nomics and Politics. 

Aristine Pixley Munn, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Breaiiey School. New York City, by Miss Florence Baldwin's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. Group : Latin and French. 

Mary Frances Nearing, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of the Second 
Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 
1905-06 ; Holder of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 
1905-09. Group : Greek and English. 

Dorothy North, of Chicago. 

Prepared by Miss Florence Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group : His- 
tory and Economics and Politics. 

Anna Estelle Platt, of Baltimore. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md. Group : Mathematics 
and Physics. 

Mildred Pres singer, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. Group : Greek and Phil- 
osophy. 

Shirley Putnam, of Washington, D. C. 

Prepared by Miss Ingol's School, Cambridge, Mass. Group : English and 
Italian and Spanish. 

Leone Robinson, of Missouri. 

Prepared by the High School, St. Louis, Mo. Group: History and Economics 
and Politics. 

Elizabeth Ross, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa. Holder of Lower 
Merion High School Scholarship, 1905-06. Group : Latin and English. 

Helen Du Bois Rumrill, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1905-09. Group : Latin and Mathematics. 



Mary Catherine Ryan, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Lower Mterion High School, Ardmore, Pa. Group : Latin 
and German. 

Ellen Francis Shippen, of New Jersey. 

Prepared by the Comstock School, New York City. Group : Latin and English. 

Dorothy Ingalls Smith, of Cliicago. 

Prepared by Ascham Hall, Chicago. Holder of the Second Matriculation 
Scholarship for the Western States, 1905-06. Group : History and Eco- 
nomics and Politics. 

Barbara Spofford, of Connecticut. 

Prepared by private tuition. Group : Economics and Politics and Phil- 
osophy. 

Hilda Spraguesmith, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. Group : History and Eco- 
nomics and Politics. 

Alta Cornelia Stevens, of Chicago. 

Prepared by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. Group : History and Eco- 
nomics and Politics. 

Gladys Stout, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Misses Rayson's School, New York City. Group : Economics 
and Politics and Philosophy. 

Winifred Sturdevant, of New York. 

Prepared by Miss Wheeler's School. Providence, R. I. Student, College of 
Agriculture, Cornell University, 1905-07. Group : German and French. 

Elizabeth Thompson, of Ohio. 

Prepared by Miss Case and Miss Child's School, Philadelphia. Hearer, 
Bryn Mawr College, First Semester, 1903-04. Group: Latin and French. 

Mary Lacy Van Wagenen, of New Jersey. 

Prepared by Miss Florence Baldwin's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by 
private tuition. Group : History and Economics and Politics. 

Ruth Anita Wade, of Montana. 

Prepared by the High School, Helena, Mont. University of Chicago, 1904- 
06. Holder of James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 1907-08. Group : 
Greek and Latin. 

Anne Garrett Walton, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa., and by private 
tuition. Holder of Foundation Scholarship, and of Mlaria Hopper Scholar- 
ship, 1906-07. Holder of Foundation Scholarship and James E. Rhoads 
Junior Scholarship, 1907-08. Group : Latin and English. 

Cynthia Maria Wesson, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by Miss Winsor's School, Boston, Mass. Group : English and 
Italian and Spanish. 

Emma Vestine White, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Collegiate Institute for Girls, Philadelphia, and by private 
tuition. Group : German and Spanish. 

Annie Leslie Whitney, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by the Milton . Academy. Group : History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Marnette Wood, of Arkansas. 

Prepared by the High School, Hot Springs, Ark., and by private tuition. 
Group : Latin and German. 

Grace La Pierre Wooldridge, of Baltimore. 

Prepared by the Brvn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md. Holder of Bryn Mawr 
School Scholarship, 1905-09. Group : History and Economics and Politics. 



89 



IV. 

College Preachers for the Year 1908-09. 

September 30th. — Professor George A. Barton, Ph.D., of Bryn Mawr 

College. 
October 14th.— The Rev. Floyd W. Tomkins, S.T.D., Rector of Holy 

Trinity Church, Philadelphia. 
October 28th. — The Rev. Robert Ellis Thompson, Ph.D., S.T.D., 

Principal of the Boys' Central High School of Philadelphia. 
November 11th. — The Rev. Edward M. Jefferys, Rector of St. Peter's 

Church, Philadelphia. 
December 9th. — Mr. Robert Elliott Speer, A.M., Secretary of the 

Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions. 
January 6th. — The Rev. Charles E. St. John, Pastor of the First 

Unitarian Church of Philadelphia. 
February 3rd. — Intermitted. 
February 17th. — Mr. James Wood, of Mt. Kisco, N. Y. (Founder's 

Lecture) . 
March 10th. — The Rt. Rev. William Nellson McVickar, D.D., S.T.D., 

Bishop of Rhode Island. 
March 17th. — The Rev. Alfred G. Mortimer, D.D., Rector of St. 

Mark's Episcopal Church, Philadelphia. 
March 31st. — Professor Rufus M. Jones, Ph.D., of Haverford Col- 
lege. 

April 28th. — The Rev. Langdon C. Stewardson, D.D., Ph.D., Presi- 
dent of Hobart College, Geneva, N. T. 

May 12th. — The Rev. Hugh Black, M.A., Jesup Graduate Professor 
of Practical Theology, Union Theological Seminary. 

May 30th.— The Rev. George Hodges, D.D., D.C.L., Dean of the 
Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge, Mass. 



90 



V. 

Addresses Given During the Year 1908-09. 

Commencement Address. 

President David Stare Jordan, President of Leland Stanford 
Jr. University, "War and Mankind." 

Founder's Lecture. 

Mr. James Wood, of Mt. Kisco, N. Y., "Reasons for the Exist- 
ence of the Religious Society of Friends." 

College Lectures. 

Mr. C. R. Ashbee, of Campden, Gloucestershire, England, "The 

Arts and Crafts and the Spirit of Socialism." 
Mr. C. Leonard Woolley, of the University of Oxford, England, 

"The Results of the Second Eckley B. Coxe Expedition. 

Excavations in Nubia." 
Mrs. Bernhard Berenson, of Italy, "The Study and Enjoyment 

of Italian Art" (three lectures). 

Professor J. P. Mahaffy, of Trinity College, Dublin, a short 
address on "The Irish Race." 

Mr. Charles Johnston, formerly of the Bengal Civil Service, 
"A Tour Through India." 

Mrs. Marion Craig-Wentworth, of Boston, reading of Maeter- 
linck's "Ardiane and Barbe Bleu." 

Mr. James Wood, of Mt. Kisco, N. Y., "Pre-Historic Ruins in 
Yucatan." 

Mr. G. Lowes Dickinson, Fellow and Lecturer of Kings Col- 
lege, University of Cambridge, England, "Social Ideals of 
Democracy." 

Professor Eugen Kuhnemann, Professor of Philosophy in the 
University of Breslau, "Nietzsche's Zarathustra." 

Before the Christian Union. 

Miss Agnes Hamilton, of the Kensington Settlement, Philadel- 
phia, "Settlement Work." 
Miss Amy Hartshokne, of Merion, Pa., "Miss Tsuda's School 

in Japan." 
Dr. Arthur S. Lloyd. 



91 

Mrs. Alexander, of Castle Point, N. J., "Prison Work and the 
New Girls' Reformatory-" 

Before the College Equal Suffrage Chapter. 

Mrs. Philip Snowdon, of England, "The English Working 
Woman and her Need for the Ballot." 

The Rev. Anna Howard Shaw, President of the National 
American Woman Suffrage Association, "The Modern Dem- 
ocratic Ideal." 

Before the College Settlement Association. 

Miss Anna H. Davis, of Philadelphia, "College Settlement Work 
from the Practical and Theoretical Sides." 

Before the Consumers' League. 

Mr. Benjamin Marsh, of New York City, "City Planning." 

Before the English Club. 

Mr. Richard Watson Gilder, Editor of the Century Magazine, 
"In Praise of Poetry." 

Before the Graduate Club. 

President M. Casey Thomas, "The Professional Woman and 
Marriage." 

The Hon. Elmer Elsworth Brown, Commissioner of Educa- 
tion, "The World Standard in Education." 

Professor Kirby Flower Smith, Professor of Latin, Johns 
Hopkins University, "The Legend of Sappho and Phaon." 

Professor Charlotte Angas Scott, Alumnae Professor of Mathe- 
matics, Bryn Mawr College, "The Use and Misuse of Mathe- 
matics by Non-Mathematicians." 

Professor James W. Bright, Professor of English, Johns Hop- 
kins University, "The ^Esthetic Factors in the Problems of 
English Spelling." 

Before the Laiv Club. 

Mr. Owen J. Roberts, of Philadelphia, "What to Do with Our 

Criminals." 
Mr. Henry S. Drinker, of Philadelphia, "Interstate Commerce." 
Dean Clarence D. Ashley, Dean of the Law School in New 

York University, "Woman as a Citizen." 

Before the League for the Service of Christ. 
Dr. Samuel Zwemer, of Arabia. 
The Rev. C. A. R. Janvier, "Work in India." 



92 

Dr. Higgins, of Boston, "Made in the Image of God." 
Miss Emily Taylor, of the Y. W. C. A. of Germantown, Phila- 
delphia. 
Mr. Charles Deems, of Boston, "Work Among Sailors in Boston." 
Miss Bertha Conde, National Secretary of the T. W. C. A. 

Before the Oriental Club. 

Dr. James L. Barton, of Boston, "The New Awakening in China." 

Before the Philosophical Club. 

Professor Hugo Munsterberg, Professor of Psychology in Har- 
vard University, "The Practical Applications of Psychology." 

Professor Frederick J. E. Woodbridge, Professor of Philosophy, 
Columbia University, "Consciousness and Evolution." 

Professor James Rowland Angell, Professor of Experimental 
Psychology, Chicago University, "The Influence of Darwin- 
ism on Modern Psychology." 

Before the Science Club. 

Dr. James Barnes, Associate in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 

"Some Solar Problems." 
Professor Robert W. Wood, Professor of Experimental Physics, 

Johns Hopkins University, "Air Ships." 

Entertainments. 

Five Expositions of Classical and Modern Chamber Music by 
Mr, Arthur Whiting, of New York, assisted by Mr. Alwin 
Schroeder, Mr. Cecil Fanning, and Mrs. Charles Rabold. 

For the Benefit of the Academic Endowment Fund. 
Piano Recital by Miss Katharine Goodson. 
Piano Recital by Mrs. Rita Wilbourn and Miss Willette Wil- 

bourn. 
Performance of "In a Balcony," by the Class of 1908. 
Performance of "The Canterbury Pilgrims," by the Coburn 

Players. 



93 



VI. 

Gifts Received by the College During the Year 1908-09. 

Our sincere gratitude is due for the following gifts 
which have been received during the past year, in addition 
to gifts of special books to the library which are enumerated 
and acknowledged in the report of the Librarian : 

From the Alumnse Association of Bryn Mawr College, 
for Academic Endowment, $102,653. 

From the Alumnse Association of the Girl's High and 
Normal School, Philadelphia, for the L. C. B. Saul Memorial 
Scholarship, $100. 

From the Athletic Association, gift for window seat in 
gymnasium, $25. 

From the class of 1912, gift for leaded glass windows, 
$800. 

From the Board of Education of the City of Philadel- 
phia, for City Scholarships, $1,600. 

From the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md., for 
Bryn Mawr School Scholarships, $2,000. 

From the Class of 1900, for a clock for Pembroke Hall, 
$66.25. 

From the Class of 1902, for books for the library, 
$150. 

From Miss Mary E. Garrett, for fellowships and grad- 
uate scholarships, $5,190.05 ; for competitive entrance schol- 
arships, $1,800; for art and archaeology, $429.32; for pub- 
lication of college monographs, $350 ; for lectures, $302 ; for 
case for mathematical models, $100 ; for map of grounds and 
plans for planting grounds, $479 ; for list of Italian pictures, 
$197 ; for the department of psychology, $211 ; for reference 
books for the president's office, $20 ; for the British Museum 
catalogue, $482.89; for books for the library, $222.30; for 
annual subscription to the Woman's Table at the Naples 
Zoological Station, to the Marine Biological Laboratory 



94 

at Wood's Holl, and to the American Schools of Classical 
Studies at Athens and Rome, $600. 

From Professor Caroline Louise Ransom, for the depart- 
ment of art and archaeology, $222.68. 

From Dean Marion Reilly, towards the building of 
Penygroes, $1,502.80; through friends, for books for the 
English department, $64.92. 

From Mrs. Charles Roberts, for subscription to the 
American School of Oriental Research in Palestine, $100. 

From Mr. J. G. Rosengarten, for books for the library, 
$50. 

From Miss Helen Lee Stevens, for books for the Latin 
department, $25. 

From the Students' Building Committee, for improve- 
ment in Cartref, $50.29. 

From President M. Carey Thomas, for academic sala- 
ries, $300. 

From Mrs. Anna WoerishoiTer, for books for the depart- 
ment of German and Teutonic philology, in memory of Mrs. 
Anna Ottendorfer, $500. 

From an anonymous donor, for gymnasium apparatus, 
$30.08. 



95 



VII. 

Titles of Scientific Publications of the Faculty which 
Appeared in the Year 1908-09. 

Dr. James Barnes. 

"The New Lines in the Spectrum of Calcium." Astros- 
physical Journal, Vol. 30, pp. 14-19, July, 1909. 

"A Simple Fabry and Perot Interferometer." Science, 
Vol. 30, p. 29, July 2, 1909. 

Dr. George A. Barton. 

Article in Hastings' Encyclopaedia of Religion and 
Ethics, Vol. I, Edinburgh and New York, 1908: "Altar" 
(Semitic), pp. 350-354. 

Articles in Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible in one vol- 
ume; Edinburgh and New York, 1909; "Amelek, Amele- 
kites," pp. 24, 25. "Amrnon, Ammonites," pp. 26, 27. 
"Amorites," p. 27. "Aramaeans," pp. 46, 47. "Canaan, 
Canaanites," pp. 110, 111. "Dispersion," p. 193. "Edom, 
"Edomites," p. 203. "Heman," p. 342. "Hittites," pp. 334, 
335. "Hivites," p. 355. "Horites," p. 362. "Israel, His- 
tory and Religion," pp. 393-417. "Jebus, Jebusites," p. 428. 
"Jew, Jews," p. 465. "Kedar," p. 512. "Kennizites," p. 
513. "Kir," p. 522. "Lords of the Philistines," p. 554. 
"Midian, Midianites," p. 616. "Moab, Moabites," p. 626. 
"Perizzites," p. 701. "Philistines," pp. 724, 725. 
"Phoenicia, Phoenicians," pp. 725-727. "Kabbah," p. 780. 
"Paces," p. 781. "Rephaim," p. 790/ "Shittim," p. 851. 
"Shobach," p. 851. "Shobi," p. 851. "Titans," p. 940. 

Abstract of a paper on the "Development of Babylonian 
Picture Writing." American Journal of Archaeology , New 
Series, Vol. 13, p. 53. 



96 



"The Christian Message According to Paul." Friends* 
Quarterly Examiner, No. 271, pp. 309-326.- 

"Friends' Ministry in the Early Eighteenth Century." 
British Friend, New Series, Vol. 18, pp. 23, 24, and 51, 52. 

"The Message of Christ." Friends' Quarterly Exam^ 
iner" No. 170, pp. 232-248. 

"Missionary Influence in Turkey." In J. L. Barton's 
Daybreak in Turkey, p. 118. 

"On an Old Babylonian Letter addressed 'to Lushta- 
mar.' " Journal of the American Oriental Society, Vol. 29, 
pp. 220-223. 

"On the Babylonian Origin of Plato's Nuptial Number." 
Journal of the American Oriental Society, Vol. 29, pp. 
210-219. 

"On a Reading of II Samuel: 12, 27." Journal of 
Biblical Literature, Vol. 27, pp. 147-153. 

"Parables Outside the Gospels." Biblical World, Vol. 
33, pp. 305-313. 

"Penn and Religious Liberty." In Penn and Religious 
Liberty, by Clergymen of Sixteen Denominations, pp. 35-38. 

"Some Problems in Ancient Palestinian Topography." 
Journal of Biblical Literature, Vol. 28, pp. 26-33. 

Review of Lagrange's "Messianisme chez les Juifs." 
Bibliotheca Sacra, Vol. 79, pp. 372-373. 

Review of Montgomery's "The Samaritans." Biblical 
World, Vol. 32, pp. 116-118,. 

Review of Paton's "Esther," in the "International 
Critical Commentary." American Journal of Theology, Vol. 
13, pp. 286, 287. 

Review of Radau's "Letters to Cassite Kings from the 
Temple Archives of Nippur," Vol. 17, Pt. 1, of Hilprecht's 
"Babylonian Expedition of the University of Pennsylvania, 
Series A: Cuneiform Texts." Bibliotheca Sacra, Vol. 79, 
pp. 539-545. 

Review of Rogers's "Religion of Babylonia and 
Assyria." American Journal of Theology, Vol. 13, pp. 318, 
319. 



97 



Dr. Florence Bascom. 



Geologic Atlas of the United States — Philadelphia Folio, 
No. 162 : elephant folio, pp. 1-7, 15-23 ; 10 maps, Geologic 
Column and 1 page of illustration. Printed by the United 
States Geological Survey, March, 1908. 

Geologic Atlas of the United States — Trenton Folio : 
elephant folio, pp. 1-6, 17, 19-21, 23-24; 3 maps, Geologic 
Column, No. 167. Printed by the United States Geological 
Survey, April, 1908. 

Dr. Carleton F. Brown. 

"Irish-Latin Influence in Cynewulfian Texts." Eng- 
lische Studien, Vol. 40, pp. 1-29, December, 1908. 

"The 'Lost Leaf of Piers •the Plowman." The Nation, 
pp. 298-9, New York, March 25, 1909. 

Dr. Theodore de Leo De Laguna. 

"The Interpretation of the Apology." Philosophical 
Review, Vol. 18, No. 1, pp. 23-37, January, 1909. 

Miss Lucy Martin Donnelly. 

"The Heart of a Blue Stocking." Atlantic Monthly, 
October, 1908. 

Dr. Clarence Errol Ferree. 

"The Streaming Phenomenon." American Journal of 
Psychology, Vol. 19, pp. 484-503, October, 1908. 

Dr. Tenney Frank. 

"A Chapter in the Story of Roman Imperialism." 
Classical Philology, Vol. 4, pp. 118-138, 1909. 

"Classical Scholarship in Mediaeval Iceland." Ameri- 
can Journal of Philology, Vol. 30, pp. 139-152, 1909. 

"An Emendation of St. Augustine, De Civ. Dei, II, 27." 
Classical Philology, Vol. 4, pp. 436-437, 1909. 



98 

"Some Classical Quotations from the Middle Ages." 
Classical Philology, Vol. 4, pp. 82-83, 1909. 

Dr. Orie Latham Hatcher. 

"Report and Recommendation of the Committee on Co- 
ordination of Standards of the Virginia Association of Col- 
leges and Schools for Girls." pp. 7. J. P. Bell Co., Lynch- 
burg, Va., February, 1909. 

Miss Georgiana Goddard King. 

"I Passed an Ancient Way." McClure's Magazine, 
August, 1909. 

"Nocturne." McClure's Magazine, June, 1909. 

Dr. Elmer P. Kohler. 

"The Action of Alkaline Hydroxides on a-Bromketones." 
American Chemical Journal, Vol. 50, pp. 417-430. 

"Triphenylindene and Some of its Derivatives." Amer- 
ica?! Chemical Journal, Vol. 40, pp. 217-232. 

Dr. James H. Leuba. 

"An Apparatus for the Study of Kinesthetic Space Per- 
ception." American Journal of Psychology, Vol. 20, pp. 
370-373. 

"The Influence of the Duration and of the Rate of Arm 
Movements upon the Judgment of their Length." Amer- 
ican Journal of Psychology, Vol. 20, pp. 374-385. 

"Magic and Religion." Sociological Review, pp. 20-35, 
January, 1909. 

"The Psychological Nature of Religion." American 
Journal of Theology, pp. 77-85, January, 1909. 

"The Psychological Origin and the Nature of Religion." 
pp. 1-95. Archbald Constable & Co., London, 1909. 

"The Psychological Origin of Religion." Monist, Vol. 
19, pp. 27-35. 

"Three Types of Behavior." American Journal of Psy- 
chology, Vol. 20, pp. 107-119. 



99 



Dr. Marion Parris. 



"Total Utility and the Economic Judgment Compared 
with their Ethical Counterparts." pp. 104. The John C. 
Winston Co., Philadelphia, 1909. 

Dr. Caroline Louise Ransom. 

"The International Congress of Archaeologists." Class- 
ical Philology, Vol. 4, pp. 311-313, July, 1909. 

Dr. Albert Schinz. 

"Anti-pragmatisme examen des droits respectifs de 
l'aristocratie intellectuelle et de la democratic sociale." pp. 
309. Alcan, Paris, 1909. 

"Autour d'un Accent." Revue de philologie franqaise, 
Vol. 22, 4 trimestre, pp. 291-302. 

"French Literature." International Yearbook for 1908. 

"The Crisis of the French Novel." Forum, January, 
1909. 

"Will English be the International Language ?" North 
American Review, May, 1909. 

Dr. William Roy Smith. 

"Sectionalism in Pennsylvania during the Revolution." 
Political Science Quarterly, Vol. 24, pp. 208-235, June, 1909. 

Review of "Letters from Port Royal, Written at the 
Time of the Civil War." Edited by Elizabeth Ware Pear- 
son. Bryn Mawr Alumnw Quarterly, Vol. 3, pp. 130-132, 
June, 1909. 

Dr. Nettie Maria Stevens. 

"The Effect of Ultra-violet Light upon the Developing 
Eggs of Ascaris megalocephala." 11 pp. and 3 double plates. 
Archiv f. Entwickelungsmechanik der Organismen, Bd. 27, 
Hft. 4. Leipzig. 

"Further Studies on the Chromosomes of the Coleop- 
tera." 21 pp., 3 plates. Journal of Experimental Zoology, 
Vol. 6, No. 1, January, 1909. 



100 

"Notes on Regeneration in Planaria simplicissima and 
Planaria morgani." 12 pp., 26 text figures. Archiv f. 
EntwickelungsmechaniJc der Organism-en, Bd. 27, Hft. 4. 
Leipzig. 

"An Unpaired Heterochromosome in the Aphids." 13 
pp., 2 plates. Journal of Experimental Zoology, Vol. 6, 
No. 1, January, 1909. 

Mr. J. Edmund Wright. 

"Corresponding Dynamical Systems." Annali di Mate- 
matica Pura ed Applicata, Vol. 16, 3rd Series, pp. 1-26, 1909. 

"Differential Equations Admitting a Group." Ameri- 
can Journal of Mathematics, Vol. 31, pp. 299-302, 1909. 

"The Differential Equations Satisfied by Abel i an Theta- 
Functions of Genus Three." American Journal of Mathe- 
matics, Vol. 31, pp. 271-298, 1909. 

"An Extension of certain Integrability Conditions." 
Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. xv, 
No. 1. pp. 6-9. October, 1909. 

Dr. Wilmer Cave Wright. 

Review of Foerster's "Libanii Opera." Classical Phil- 
ology, Vol. 4, pp. 325-328, July, 1909. 

Review of Mau's "Die Religionsphilosophie Kaiser 
Julians in seinen Reden auf Konig Helios und die Gotter- 
mutter." Classical Philology, Vol. 4, pp. 87-89, January, 
1909. 



101 

VIII. 

Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 

1908-09. 



Department 



Course 



Instructor 



Hours 
weekly 



No. in Clas 



1st 
Sem. 



2nd 

Sem. 



Greek. 



Latin. 



English. 



Elementary Greek, Grammar, 
Composition and Reading. . 

Plato and Composition, minor. 

Euripides and Composition, 
minor 

Homer, minor 

Demosthenes, major 

Thucydides, major 

Aristophanes, major 

Sophocles, major 

History of Greek Literature, 
major 

Sophocles, post-major 

Lucian, post-major 

Euripides, Heracles, post- 
major 

Greek Prose Composition, 
post-major 

Melic Poets 



Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Attic Tragedy. . . 

Seminary in Aristophanes .... 

Livy and Composition, minor. 

Cicero and Composition, 
minor 

Horace, minor 

Tacitus, major. 

Latin Comedy, major 

History of Latin Literature, 
major 

Latin Elegy, post-major — 

Vergil, post-major 

Pv,oman Prose of the Empire, 
post-major 

Pliny-Martial, post-major . . . 

Seneca, Lucan, post-major.. . 

Advanced Latin Prose Com- 
position 



Graduate Courses 
Seminary in Roman Lyric. 
Seminary in Roman Litera- 
ture 

Latin Journal Club 



History of English Literature, 

First Year, required 

Elocution, First Year, required 

English Composition, First 

Year, required 



History of English Literature, 
Second Year, required 

Elocution, Second Year, re- 
quired 



Miss Kirk 
Dr. Sanders 



Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders 



Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders 



Dr. Wright 
Dr. Wheeler 



Dr. Frank 
Dr. Wheeler 



Dr. Frank 
Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Frank 



Dr. Wheeler 

Dr. Frank 

Dr. Wheeler 

and Dr. Frank 



Dr. Jackson 
Mr. King 

Dr. Crandall 
Miss King 
Miss Ward 
Dr. Loshe 

Dr. Jackson 

Mr. King 



lifort 
nightly 



.. 7. 



.94. 



.93. 



65. 



.70. 



102 

Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1908-09.— Continued. 



Department 



Course 



English Composition, Second 
Year, required 

English Critics of the Nine- 
teenth Century, minor 

English Poetry from 1780 to 
1832, minor 

Anglo-Saxon, minor 

Middle English Romances, 
minor 

Classical and Romantic Prose, 
major 

English Fiction of the Nine- 
teenth Century, elective . . . 

Argumentation, elective 

Imitative Writing, elective. . . 

Reading of Prose Authors, 
elective 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in English Litera- 
ture 

Seminary in Middle English.. . 

Beowulf 

Seminary in Nondramatic 
English Literature 

Continental Influences on Non- 
dramatic English Litera- 
ture 

English Journal Club 



Elementary German, Gram 
mar and translation 

Critical Reading and Gram- 
mar and Composition, 
minor 

History of German Literature, 
minor 

History of German Literature 
and Selected Reading.major 

Faust (2nd part), major 

Prose Composition, major. . . . 

Advanced German Composi- 
tion and Reading of Modern 
Prose, elective 

German Literature from 1850 
to the present time and 
Critical Reading, post- 
major 

Middle High German, post- 
. major 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in German Litera 

ture 

The German Essay 



Instructor 


Hours 
weekly 


No. IN 


Class 


1st 
Sem. 


2nd 

Sem. 


Dr. Crandall 
Miss King 
Miss Ward 
Dr. Loshe 


... 1*.. 


...04... 


...65... 


• Dr. Clark 


... 3... 


...15... 


...13... 


Dr. Jackson 
Dr. Brown 


... 2... 
... 2... 






" 


... 3... 






Dr. Clark 


... 3... 


...12... 


...10... 


Dr. Crandall 
Miss King 


... 2... 
... 2... 
... 2... 


...11... 
... 5... 
... 5... 


...12... 
... 5... 
... 5... 


Mr. King 




... 7... 




Dr. Clark 
Dr. Brown 


... 3... 
... 3... 
... 2... 


... 3... 
... 6... 
... 4... 


... 3... 
... 5... 
... 4... 


Dr. Hatcher 


... 3... 


... 5... 


... 5... 


Dr. Clark 

Dr. Brown and 

Dr. Hatcher 


... 1... 

... 14.. 

fort- 
nightly 


... 8... 
... 7... 


... 7... 
... 5.. 


Miss Chamber- 
lin 


... 5... 


... 8... 


... 7... 


Dr. Jessen 


... 3... 


...31... 


...25... 


Dr. Weyhe 


... 2... 


...20... 


...19... 


Dr. .lessen 
Dr. Weyhe 


... 3... 
... 1... 
... 1... 


...15... 
...14... 
...13... 


...14... 
...13... 

...12... 


Miss Chamber- 
lin 


2 


... 2... 


... 2... 


Dr. Jessen 


... 3... 


... 3... 


... 3... 


Dr. Weyhe 


... 1... 


... 1... 


... 1... 


Dr. Jessen 


... 2... 
... 1... 


... 1... 


... 1... 
... 3... 



103 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1908-09.— Continued. 



Depabtment 


Course 


Instructor 


Hours 
weekly 


No. in 

1st 
Sem. 


Class 

2nd 
Sem. 


Teutonic 
Philology. . 




Dr. Weyhe 

Dr. Nicolay 

M. Foulet 
Dr. Schinz 

M. Foulet 
Dr. Schinz 

M. Foulet 

Dr. Schinz 

Dr. Holbrook 

Dr. DeHaan 

M. Foulet 

Dr. DeHaan 

Dr. Schinz 

Dr. Holbrook 

Dr. Barton 
Miss Downing 


... 2... 
... 2... 
... 1... 

... 2... 
... 2... 

... 2... 
... 3... 

... 11. . 

fort- 
nightly 


... 1... 
... 1... 
... 1... 

...18... 
...21... 

... 1... 
...12... 

... 4... 


... 1... 
... 1... 
... 1... 




Elementary French, Grammar 


... 7... 




History of French Literature 
and Collateral Reading, 


...20... 




French Critical Readings and 

History of French Literature 
and Collateral Reading, 


...20... 
.. 20 .. 




French Critical Readings and 

Composition, major 

French Comedy, post-major... 
French Lyric Poetry, post- 


...17... 
3 




Teacher's Course in Advanced 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Modern French 


5 




Old French Philology 

Old French Seminary 


... 1... 
12 




Italian Classics in English 

Translations, minor 

Italian Classical Literature, 












Spanish, Literary History, 
Composition and Critical 




Graduate Courses 


Romance 


Romance Languages, Journal 
Club 


Semitic Lan- 
guages AND 


History of Christian Doctrine, 


... 5... 


ERATURE. . . . 


New Testament Canon, elec- 




Graduate Courses 















104 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1908-09. — Continued. 



Department 



History. 



Economics 
and Poli- 
tics 



Law 

Philosopht. 



Course 



History of Europe to the pe- 
riod of the Renaissance, 
minor 

History of Europe from the 
Renaissance to the close of 
the religious wars, minor. . . 

History of Europe from the 
Treaty of Westphalia to the 
close ' of the Napoleonic 
Campaign, major 

History of Europe from the 
Congress of Vienna to the 
Present Time, major 

England in the Tudor period, 
post-major 

England in the Stuart Period, 
post-major 

American Constitutional His- 
tory from 1789 to the Pres 
ent Time, post-major 



Graduate Courses 

Historical Method and Criti- 



cism.- _• • • 

Seminary in American History 
Historical Journal Club. . . 



Introduction to Economics, 
minor 

Introduction to Politics, mi- 
nor 

Social Politics, major 

History of Economic Thought, 
major . 

Public Finance, post-major. 

Theoretical Sociology, post- 
major 



Seminary in Theory of Value 
Economic Journal Club 



Instructor 



Dr. Allison 
Dr. Smith 



Dr. Allison 



Dr. Smith 



Dr. Allison 

Dr. Smith 

Dr. Allison 

and Dr. Smith 



Miss Parris 
Dr. Williamson 



Miss Parris 
Dr. Williamson 



Miss Parris 



Hours 
weekly 



Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Economics. ... . . Dr. Williamson 

Miss Parris 
Dr. Williamson 
and Miss Parris 



Torts, minor 

Constitutional Law, minor. . . . 

History of Philosophy, re- 
quired 

Psychology, required 

Elementary Ethics, minor. . . . 

Problems in Metaphysics, 
minor 

Psychology of Instinct, Emo- 
tion and Will, minor 

Experimental Psychology, 
minor . . . . 

Empiricism and Rationalism 
major 

Philosophy of Kant, major. . . 

Experimental Psychology 
major 



Dr. Ashley 



Dr. deLaguna 

Dr. Leuba 
Dr. deLaguna 

Mr. Gifford 

Dr. Leuba 

Mr. Ferree 

Mr. Gifford 
Dr. deLaguna 

Mr. Ferree 



.2... 
. 3... 
.2... 
fort- 
nightly 



No. in Class 



1st 

Sem. 



... 2... 

fort- 
nightly 

... 2... 
... 1... 



43 



105 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1908-09.— Continued. 



Department 



Education . . 

History of 
Art and 
Classical 
Archae- 
ology .... 



Course 



Mathematics.. 



Animal Psychology, major.. . . 

Theory of Pragmatism, elec- 
tive .' 

Logic, elective 

Types of Metaphysical Theory, 
post-major 

Experimental Psychology, 
post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Ethics 

Philosophical Journal Club. .. 

Seminary in Psychology 

Systematic Psychology 

Psychological Laboratory 
Work 

Psychological Journal Club . . . 

Education, elective 

Greek and Roman Art, elec- 
tive 

Greek and Roman Art, elec- 
tive 

Greek and Roman Vases, 
elective 

Greek and Roman Vases, 
elective 

Greek and Roman Private 
Life 

English Church Architecture. . 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Archaeology 

Seminary in Archaeology 

Archaeological Journal Club. . . 



Archaeological Journal Club. . 



Trigonometry, Preparatory 
Course 

Solid Geometry, Preparatory 
Course 

Analytical Conies and Theory 
of Equations, minor. . . . 

Differential Calculus and Ad- 
vanced Algebra and Trigo- 
nometry, minor 

Differential and Integral Cal- 
culus, Theory of Equations 
and Differential Equations, 
major 

Analytical Geometry, History 
of Mathematics, major. . 

Mathematical Processes and 
Computations, elective. ... 

Applied Mathematics, elec 
tive 

Modern Pure Geometry, post 
major 



Instructor 



Dr. Leuba 



Dr. deLaguna 
Mr. Gifford 



Mr. Ferree 



Dr. deLaguna 
Dr. deLaguna 
and Mr. Gifford 

Dr. Leuba 
Mr. Ferree 

Dr. Leuba and 
Mr. Ferree 

Dr. Leuba and 
Mr. Ferree 
Dr. Leuba 



Hours 
weekly 



Dr. Ransom 
Miss Spaulding 

Dr. Ransom 
Miss Spaulding 

Miss McMahan 



Dr. Ransom 
Miss Spaulding 

Dr. Ransom 

and 

Miss Spaulding 

Miss Spaulding 



Dr. Ragsdale 

Dr. Scott 
Mr. Wright 

Mr. Wright 
Dr. Scott 

Mr. Wright 
Dr. Scott 



. 3... 
. 1*.. 

fort- 
nightly 
3... 
3... 



.. 1*. 
fort- 
nightly 
.. 1*.. 
fort- 
nightly 



No. in Class 



1st 
Sem. 



.. 2. 
. . 2. 



.12. 



.36. 



.20. 



2nd 
Sem. 



.20. 



.41. 



106 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1908-09.— Continued. 



Department 



Course 



Instructor 



Hours 
weekly 



No. in Class 



1st 2nd 

Sem. Sem. 



Physics . 



Chemistry . . 



Geology. 



General Course in Analysis, 
post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Linear Systems of Algebraic 

Curves 

Linear Differential Equations . 
Mathematical Journal Club. . . 

Heat, Sound and Properties 
of Matter, minor 

Light, Electricity and Magne- 
tism, minor 

Laboratory Work, minor 

Laboratory Work, minor 

Theory of Light, Mechanics, 
major 

Heat, Electricity and Magne- 
tism 

Laboratory Work, major 

Laboratory Work, major 

General Optics, post-major. . . 

Graduate Courses 

Electricity and Magnetism.. . . 

Physical journal Club 

Introduction to General Chem- 
istry, minor 

Introduction to Organic Chem- 
istry, minor 

Laboratory Work, minor 

Laboratory Work, minor 

Theoretical Chemistry, major 
Organic Chemistry, major. . . . 
Laboratory Work, major 

Laboratory Work, major 

Inorganic Chemistry, post- 
major 

Graduate Courses 

Advanced Organic Chemistry. 

Seminary in Organic Chem- 
istry 

Seminary in Inorganic Chem- 
istry 

Chemical Journal Club 

Physiography, minor 

Lithologic Geology, minor. . . . 
Field Work and Laboratory 

Work, minor 

Field Work and Laboratory 

Work, minor 



Mr. Wright 



Dr. Scott 

Mr. Wright 

Dr. Scott and 

Mr. Wright 



Dr. Huff 

Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Huff and 

Dr. Lowater 

Dr. Barnes and 

Dr. Lowater 

Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Huff 

Dr. Barnes and 

Dr. Lowater 

Dr. Huff and 

Dr. Lowater 

Dr. Barnes 



Dr. Huff 

Dr. Huff and 

Dr. Barnes 



Dr. Kohler 

Dr. Forbes 
Dr. Kohler and 
Miss Heritage 
Dr. Forbes and 
Miss Heritage 
Dr. Forbes 
Dr. Kohler 
Dr. Forbes and 
Miss Heritage 
Dr. Kohler and 
Miss Heritage 

Dr. Forbes 



Dr. Kohler 



Dr. Forbes 

Dr. Kohler and 

Dr. Forbes 

Dr. Bascom 
Mr. Reeds 

Dr. Bascom 

Mr. Reeds 



..2.. 

..2.. 
1. 



fort- 
nightly 



..4.. 
..3.. 
..4.. 



107 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1908-09. — Continued. 











No. IN 


Class 


Department 


Course 


Instructor 


Hours 
weekly 






1st 


2nd 










Sem. 


Sem. 




Historical Geology, major .... 


Mr. Reeds 


... 5... 


... 2... 






Pleistocene and Structural 














Dr. Bascom 


... 5... 








Field Work and Laboratory 














Mr. Reeds 


... 5... 








Field Work and Laboratory 














Dr. Bascom 
Mr. Reeds 


... 5... 
... 2... 


... 7 .. 


... 2 .. 












" 


... 2... 




...10... 




Graduate Course 
















... 2... 




3 


Biology 


General Biology, minor 


Dr. Tennent 


... 4... 


...45... 








Dr. Randolph 


... 1... 


...45... 






Vertebrates and Embryology . 


Dr. Tennent 
and 












Dr. Warren 


... 5... 




...44... 




Laboratory Work, minor 


Dr. Tennent 

Dr. Warren 

and 












Dr. Randolph 


... 5... 


...45... 


...44... 




Animal Physiology, major. . . . 


Dr. Warren 


... 5... 


... 7... 






General Zoology, Anatomy, 


Dr. Tennent 












and 












Dr. Warren 


... 5... 




... 7... 




Laboratory Work, major 


Dr. Tennent 

Dr. Warren 

and 












Dr. Randolph 


... 5... 


... 7... 


... 7... 




Embryology, post-major 


Dr. Tennent 


... 1... 


... 3... 


... 4... 




Laboratory Work, post-major 


" 


3 to 5 


.. 3... 


... 5... 




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Dr. Warren 


... 1... 
... 4... 


... 2... 
... 2... 


... 2 




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... 2... 




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... 1... 




... 3 




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Dr. Tennent 


... 1... 




... 3... 










2 


. 3 






Dr. Tennent 
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Dr. Warren 


... 1... 


... 4... 


... 3... 









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(108) 



ANNUAL REPORT 



THE PRESIDENT 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



1909-10. 



Philadelphia : 

the john c. winston co. 

1910. 



Corporation. 



Asa S. Wing, 
Treasurer. 

Albert K. Smiley. 
Edward Bettle, Jb 
Howard Comfort. 
Justus C. Strawbridge. 
James Wood. 
Rtjfus M. Jones. 

Frederic H. 



Academic Year, 1910-11. 

Howard Comfort, 
President. 



Edward Bettle, Jr. 
Secretary. 

Alexander C. Wood. 
M. Carey Thomas. 
Francis R. Cope, Jr. 
Asa S. Wing. 
Charles J. Rhoads. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 
strawbridge. 



Board of Directors. 
Academic Year, 1910-11. 



Asa S. Wing. 

Treasurer. 
Albert K. Smiley. 
Edward Bettle, Jr. 
Howard Comfort. 
Justus C. Strawbridge 
James Wood. 
Rufus M. Jones. 
Alexander C. Wood. 
M. Carey Thomas. 



Howard Comfort, 
Chairman. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. 

Secretary. 
Francis R. Cope, Jr. 
Asa S. Wing. 
Charles J. Rhoads. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 
Frederic H. Strawbridge. 
Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 
Mary E. Garrett. 
Anna Rhoads Ladd. 



Executive Committee. 
Howard Comfort. M. Carey Thomas. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. Francis R. Cope, Jr. 

Rufus M. Jones. James Wood. 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 



Alexander C. Wood, 

asa S. Wing. 

M. Carey Thomas. 



Charles J. Rhoads. 
Mary E. Garrett. 
Frederic H. Strawbridge. 



Finance Committee. 

Alexander C. Wood. Charles J. Rhoads. 

Asa S. Wing. Justus C. Strawbridge. 

Mary E. Garrett. 

Library Committee. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. Rufus M. Jones. 

Howard Comfort. Thomas Raeburn White. 

Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 



Eeligious Life Committee. 

Rufus M. Jones. James Wood. 

Asa S. Wing. 



Officers of Administration. 
Academic Year, 1910-11. 

President, 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D. 
Office: Taylor Hall. 

Dean of the College, 
Marion Keili.y, A.B. 
Office: Taylor Hall. 

Recording Bean and Assistant to the President, 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D. 
Office: Taylor Hall. 

Secretary, 
Anna Bell Lawther, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Recording Secretary, 
Edith Orlady, A.B. Office : Taylor Hall. 

Comptroller, 
James G. Forrester. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Business Manager, 
Charles A. Worden, C.E. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Wardens of the Halls of Residence, 

Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Pembroke Hall. 
Alice Anthony, A.B., Denbigh Hall. 
Harriet Jean Crawford, A.B., Rockefeller Hall. 
Bertha Margaret Laws, A.B., Pembroke Hall. 
Helen Remington Calder, Radnor Hall. 
Ethel Harper, A.B., Merion Hall. 

Librarian, 
Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S. Office: The Library. 

Director of Athletics and Gymnastics, 
Constance M. K. Applebee. Office: The Gymnasium. 

Junior Bursar, 
Margaret A. Proctor, B.A. Office : Rockefeller Hall. 

Attending Physician of the College, 
Thomas F. Branson, M.D. Office hours, daily, 8 to 9.30 and 2 to 3, 
Rosemont, Penna. 

Visiting Physician of the College, 

Anne Heath Thomas, M.D. Office hours, daily, 1.30 to 3, 132 South 
18th Street, Philadelphia ; Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr College, 
daily, except Sunday, 4 to 6. 

Examining Oculist, 

Helen Murphy, M.D. Office hours, daily, 2 to 4, 1433 Spruce Street. 
Philadelphia. 

4 



Academic Appo in tmbnts. 
Academic Year, 1910-11. 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the College and Pro- 
fessor of English. 
A.B., Cornell University, 1877 ; studied at the Johns Hopkins University, 

1877-78; University of Leipsic, 1879-82; Ph.D., University of Ziirieh, 1882; 

Sorbonne and College de France, 1883 ; Dean of the Faculty of Bryn Mawr 

College and Professor of English, 1885-94. 

Charlotte Angas Scott, D.Sc., Alumnae Professor of Mathematics. 

Lincoln, England. Graduate in Honours, Girton College, University of Cam- 
bridge, England, 1880 : B.Sc. University of London 1882 ; Lecturer on 
Mathematics in Girton College, 1880-84 : lectured in connection with Newn- 
nam College, University of Cambridge, England, 1880-83 ; D.Sc, University 
of London, 1885. 

George A. Barton. Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Literature and 
Semitic Languages. 

A.B., Haverford College, 1882, and A.M., 1885 ; studied under the direction of 
the American Institute of Hebrew, 1885-86: Harvard University. 1888-91; 
Thayer Scholar, Harvard University, 1889-91 ; A.M., Harvard University, 
1890; Ph.D., Harvard University. 1891: Director of the American School 
of Oriental Study and Research in Palestine, 1902-03. 

Joseph W. Warren, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

A.B.. Harvard College, 1S71 : University of Berlin. 1871-72; University of 
Leipsic, 1872-73 ; University of Bonn, 1873-79 ; M.D., University of Bonn, 
1880; Assistant and Instructor in Physiology. Harvard Medical School, 
1881-91 ; Lecturer in Medical Department of the University of the City of 
New York, 3 885-86; Lecturer in Physiology, University of Michigan. 1889. 

Elmer P. Kohler. Ph.D.. Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B.. Muhlenberg Colleae, 1886. and A.M.. 1889; Johns Hopkins University, 
1889-91: Fellow in Chemistry. Johns Hopkins University, 1891-92; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University. 1892. 

Florence Bascom, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin. 1882. B.Sc. 1884. and A.M.. 1887: Johns 
Hopkins University. 1891-93 : Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins University. 1893 : 
Assistant in Geology and Instructor in Petrography, Ohio State University, 
1893-95. 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D.. Recording Dean and Assistant. to the 
President. 

Reading. Ens-land. B.Sc, University of London. 1S93. Ph.D.. Bryn Mawr 
Collea-e, 1896. and B.A.. Trinity OolWe Dublin. 1905: Oirton Collesre. 
University of Cambridge. England, 1889-92 ; Graduate in Honours, First 
Class, in the Camhrids-p Mathematical Trinos. 1S92: Graduate in Honours. 
Final Mathematical Schools. University of Oxford. 1892 ; Graduate Student 
in Mathematics, Brvn Mawr College. 1892-93 and Fellow in Mathematics. 
1893-94: Holder of the Mary E. Oarrett Em-onean Fellowship, and Student 
in Mathematics. University of Giittingen. 1894-95. 

Wilmer Cave Weight. Ph.D.. Associate Professor of Creek. 

Shrewsbury. England. Girton College. University of Cambridge. England, 
1888-92: Graduate in Honours. Cambridge Classical Trinos, 1892; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 1895; Fellow in Greek. Bryn Mawr College, 1892- 
93: Fellow in Latin. University of Chieae-o. 1893-94. and Fellow in Greek. 
1894-95 : Reader in Creek and Latin. University or Chicago, 1895-96. 

.Tames IT. Lettba. Ph.D.. Professor of Psychology and Education and 
Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. B.S., University of Neuchatel. 1886: Ph.B.. Ursinns 
College. 1888: Scholar in Psychology. Clark University 1892-93: Follow 
in Psychology, Clark University. 1893-95 ; Ph.D.. Clark University, 1896. 

5 



Fonger DeHaan, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish. 

Leeuwarden, Holland. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1895 ; Instructor in 
Modern Languages, Lehigh University, 1885-91 ; Fellow in Romance Lan- 
guages, Johns Hopkins University, 1893-94, Assistant in Romance Lan- 
guages, 1893-95, Instructor in Romance Languages, 1895-96, and Associate 
in Romance Languages, 1S96-97. 

Albert Schinz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French Literature. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. A.B., University of Neuchatel, 1888, and A.M., 1889. 
Licentiate in Theology, 1892 ; Student, University of Berlin, 1892-93 ; 
University of Tubingen, 1893 ; Ph.D., University of Tubingen, 1894 ; Sor- 
bonne and College de France, 1894 ; Privatdocent, University of Neu- 
chatel, 1896-97 ; Instructor in French, Clark University, 1897-98 ; Instruc- 
tor in French, University of Minnesota, 1898-99. 

Arthur Leslie Wheeler, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893 ; Scholar and Student in Classics, Yale College, 
1893-96 ; Ph.D., Yale University, 1896 ; Instructor and Tutor in Latin, 
Yale College, 1S94-1900. 

Henry Nevill Sanders, Ph.D., Professor of Greek. 

Edinburgh, Scotland. A.B., Trinity University, Toronto, 1894, and A.M., 
1897 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1903 ; Fellow in Greek, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1897-98 ; Lecturer in Greek, McGill University, 
1900-02. 

William Bashford Huff, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1889 ; A.M., University of Chicago, 1896 ; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1900 ; Lecture Assistant in Physics, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1899-1900, Assistant in Physics, 1900-01, 
and Instructor in Physics, 1901-02. 

William Roy Smith,* Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

A.B., University of Texas, 1897. and A.M., 1S98 ; Ph.D., Columbia University, 
1903 ; Acting Professor of History and Political Science, University of 
Colorado, 1900-01 ; Lecturer in History. Barnard College, 1901-02. 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, A.B., Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1893; University of Oxford, England, and Univer- 
sity of Leipsic, 1893-94, Sorbonne and College de France, and University 
of Leipsic, 1894-95. 

Karl Detlev Jessen, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German Litera- 
ture. 

Winnemark, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. A.B.. University of Chicago, 
1896, and Fellow in German, 1897-98 ; Ph.D., University of Berlin, 1901 ; 
University of Chicago, 1895-98 ; University of Kiel, 1899 ; University of 
Berlin, iS98-99, 1899-1901 : Acting Professor of Modern Languages, 
Eureka College, 1896 ; Instructor in German, Iowa State University, 
1897 ; Instructor in German, Harvard University, 1901-03, and Lecturer 
on German Literature and Aesthetics, 1904. 

Tenney Frank,* Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin. 

A.B., University of Kansas. 1898, and A.M., 1899 : Ph.D., University of 
Chicago, 1903 ; Fellow, University of Chicago, 1899-1901 ; Assistant and 
Associate in Latin, University of Chicago, 1901.-04. 

Davtd Hilt Tennent, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology. 

S.B., Olivet College, 1900; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1902-04; 
Bruce Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1904 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
-University, 1904. 

Nettie Maria Stevens, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Morphology. 

A.B., Leland Stanford. Jr.. University, 1899, and A.M.. 1900; Ph.D., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1903. Student in Hopkins Seaside Laboratory, Pacific 
Grove, Summer, 1897, 1898, 1899, and 1900. Graduate Scholar in Biology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1900-01 ; Holder of the President's European Fellow- 
ship, 1901-02 ; Student, Zoological Station, Naples, and University of 
Wiirzburg, 1901-02. 1908-09 ; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1902-03, and Research Fellow in Biology, 1903-04 : Carnegie Research 
Assistant, 1904-05 ; |Alice Freeman Palmer Research Fellow, 1908-09. 

■"Granted leave of absence for the year 1910-11. 



Carleton Fairchild Brown, Ph.D., Professor of English Philology. 

A.B., Carleton College, 1888 ; A.M., Harvard University, 1901, and Ph.D., 

1903. Shattuck Scholar, Harvard University, 1901-03 ; Instructor in 
English, Harvard University. 1903-05. 

James Barnes, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia. B. A... Dalhonsie University, Honours in Mathematics 
and Physics, 1899, and M.A., 1900 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 

1904. Holder of 1851 Exiiibition Science Research Scholarship, 1900-03 ; 
Fellow. Johns Hopkins University, 1003-04, and Assistant in Physics, 
1904-06. 

Richard Thayer Holbrook, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French 
Philology and Italian. 

A.B., Yale University. 1893 : Ph.D., Columbia University, 1902. Sorbonne, 
College de Prance, Ecole des Chavtes, 1893-94, 1895-90 : Student la Italy 
and University of Berlin. 1894-95 ; Student in Spain. 1901 ; Tutor in the 
Romance Languages and Literatures, Yale University, 1896-1901, and 
Columbia University, 1902-06. 

Theodore de Leo de Laguna, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B.. University of California, 1896, and A.M.. 1899 ; Ph.D.. Cornell Univer- 
sity. 1901. Teacher in the Government Schools of the Philippine Islands, 
1901-04 ; Honorary Fellow and Assistant In Philosophy. Cornell University, 
1904-05 : Assistant Professor of the Philosophy of Education, University 
of Michigan, 1905-07. 

Chart.es Clarence Williamson, Ph.D., Associate in Economics and 
Politics. 

A.B., Western Reserve University, 1904 ; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1907. 
Assistant in Economics and Graduate Student. Western Reserve Univer- 
sity. First Semester. 1904-05 ; Scholar In Political Economy, University 
of Wisconsin. 1904-05: Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin. 1905- 
06 : University Fellow In Political Economy. Columbia University, 1906-07 ; 
Research Assistant of the Carnegie Institution, 1905-07. 

Marion Reilly, A.B., Dean of the College. 

A.B.. Brvn Mawr College. 1901 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1901-02, 1903, 1903-06; Newnham College, University of Cambridge, 
Spring, 1907. 

Marion Parris. Ph.D., Associate in Economics. 

A.B.. Brvn Mawr Colleso, 1901, and Ph.D., 1909. Graduate Student, Brvn 
Mawr College, 1902-05. Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1905-06: Bryn 
Mawr College Research Fellow and Student in Economics and Politics, 
University of Vienna, 1906-07. 

Frederick Htjtton Getman, Ph.D., Associate in Chemistry. 

Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins University. 1903. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 
1S93-96; University of Virginia. 1896-97: Fellow in ' Chemistry. Johns 
Hopkins University, 1902-03. and Fellow by Courtesy, 1903-04 ; Carnegie 
Research Assistant in Physical Chemistry. 1903-94 : Lecturer in Physical 
Chemistrv. CoHeee of the Citv of New York, 1904-05, and Lecturer in 
Physics, Columbia University, 1907-08. 

M. Phillips Mason, Ph.D., Associate in Philosophy. 

A.B., Harvard University. 1899, A.M., 1900. and Ph.D., 1904. Corpus 
Christi College. University of Oxford, 1899-1900 ; Universities of Heidel 
bersr and Bprlin. 1900-01 ; University of Marburg; 1901-02 ; Sorbonne and 
College de France. 1902: Harvard University, 1902-04: John Harvard Fel- 
low of Harvard University, 1902-03: Instructor in Philosophy, Princeton 
University, 1905-07. 

Clarence Errol Ferree, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Psychology. 

B.S., Ohio Wesleyan University. 1900, A.M.. 1901. and M.S.. 1902: Ph.D.. 
Cornell University. 1909. Fellow in Psychology, Cornell University, 1902- 
03 : Assistant in Psychology. Cornell University. 1903-07. 



Okie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., Associate in Comparative Literature 
and Elizabethan Literature. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1888. Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1903. Graduate 
Student, University of Chicago, 1901-03, and Fellow in English, 1903-04. 

Alfred Horatio Upham, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English Lit- 
erature. 

A.B., Miami University, 1S97, and A.M., 1898 ; A.M., Harvard University, 
1901; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1908. Instructor in Latin and Greek, 
Miami University, 1S97-1900 ; Graduate Student, Harvard University, 1900- 
02 ; Professor of English, Agricultural College of Utah, 1902-05 ; Columbia 
University Fellow in Comparative Literature, 1905-06 ; Associate Professor 
of English, Miami University, 190G-08, and Professor of English and Head 
of the Department, 1908-10. 

E. Raymond Turner, Ph.D., Associate in History. 

A.B., St. John's College, 1904 ; Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins University, 1910. Fel- 
low, Johns Hopkins University, 1909-10. 

Chester Albert Reeds, Ph.D., Associate in Geology. 

B.S.. University of Oklahoma, 1905; M.S.. Yale University. 1907, and Ph.D., 
1910. Graduate Scholar, Yale University, 1905-06 ; and Fellow, 1906-08. 
Field Assistant, U. S. Geological Survey, 1903-06 ; Instructor in Mineralogy 
and Petrology, University of Oklahoma, February to June, 1908. 

Agathe Lasch, Ph.D., Associate in Teutonic Philology. 

Berlin, Germany. Ph.D., University of Heidelberg, 1909. Student, Univer- 
sity of Halle, 1906-07 ; University of Heidelberg, 1907-10. State Examina- 
tion pro facilitate docendi, Karlsruhe, 1910. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., ~N on-Resident Lecturer in English Dic- 
tion. 

Tynemouth. England. M.A., University of London, 1900. Special Lecturer 
in Elocution, Johns Hopkins University, 1901 ; Special Lecturer in Elocu- 
tion, University of California, 1902. 

Frederick A. Blossom, A.B., Lecturer in French. 

A.B., Amherst College, 189S ; Johns Hopkins University, 1903-04, 1909. 
Student of Romance Languages in Paris and Grenoble, 1905-08. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., Reader in English and Lecturer in 

Art. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1897. Fellow in Philosophy. Bryn 

Mawr College. 1896-97, and Fellow in English, 1897-98. College de France. 

First Semester. 1898-99 

F. Warren Wright, Ph.D., Lecturer in Latin. 

A.B., Wesleyan University, 1906; A.M., Harvard University, 1908; Ph.D., 
Princeton University, 1910. Student, Wesleyan University, 1906-07. Har- 
vard University, 1907-08 ; Fellow in Classics, Princeton University, 1908-10. 

Taul Leland Haworth, Ph.D.. Lecturer in History. 

A.B.. University of Indiana. 1899. and A.M.. 1901. Ph.D., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1906. Teacher of History in the Michigan Northern State Normal 
School. 1901-02; Tutor in History, Teachers' College, Columbia University, 
1904-06 ; Lecturer in History, Columbia University, Semester I, 1906-07. 

Harry Bateman, M.A., Lecturer in Mathematics. 

Manchester, England. M.A., University of Cambridge ; Graduate in Honours 
(Senior Wrangler, bracketed) in the Cambridge Mathematical Tripos, 1903. 
and First Division, First Class, Mathematical Tripos, Part II, 1904 ; 
Smith's Prizeman. 1905; Fellow of Trinity College. Cambridge : Student in 
Gottingen and Paris. 1905-06 ; Lecturer in Mathematics, University of 
Liverpool. 1906-07 ; Reader in Mathematical Physics. Manchester Univer- 
sity, 1907-10. 

C. Leonard Woolt.ey, M.A., Non-Resident Lecturer in Egyptian Art. 

Danbury. Essex England. B.A., University of Oxford. 1903 and M.A., 1907. 
Open" Scholar of New College, Oxford, 1899. Litterae Humaniores. 1903 ; 
Theological School. 1904. Assistant Keeper of the Ashmolean Museum, 
Oxford, 1905 : Assistant Curator in Egyptian Department. University 
Museum, Philadelphia. 1907 ; conducting excavations in Nubia. 1907-10. 



Harriet Randolph,* Ph.D., Demonstrator in Biology and Reader in 
Botany. 

A.B., Brvn Mawr College, 1889 ; Fellow In Hiology. Bryn Mawr College, 
1889-90; University of Zurich. 1890-92; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1892. 

Kegina Katharine Crandall, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Smith College, 1S90 ; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1902. Graduate 

Student, University of Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in History, 1894-96 ; 

Assistant in History, Smith College, 1896-99 ; Instructor in History, 
Wellesley College, 1899-1900. 

Abby Kirk, A.B., Reader in Elementary Greek. 

A.B.. Brvn Mawr College, 1892. Reader in English, Bryn Mawr College, 
1892-98. 

Lillie Deming Loshe, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1899 ; A.M., Columbia University, 1903, and 
Ph.D., 1908. Graduate Student, Barnard College, 1899-1900 ; Columbia 
University, 1901-04, First Semester, 1904-05, and 1905-07. 

) 

Emma Haeberli, Ph.D., Reader in Elementary French. 

Berne, Switzerland. Ph.D., University of Berne, 1903. Graduate Student, 
University of Berne, and Tutor in French and German , 1904-05, 1906-09 ; 
Instructor in French and German, Virginia College, Roanoke, Va., 1909-10. 

Martha Plaisted, A.B., Reader in English. 

A.B., Brvn Mawr College, 1908. Instructor in English, Sweet Briar College, 
1908-10. 

Mary Jeffers, A.M., Reader in German. 

A.B.. Brvn Mawr College, 1895, and A.M.. 1897. Graduate Student, Brvn 
Mawr College, 1895-98, 1903-04, 1906-07 ; Teacher of Latin in the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr. 1895-98 : Student at the Universities of 
Munich and Halle. 189S-99 ; Teacher of Latin and History in the Girls' 
Latin School, Baltimore. Md., 1900-01 ; Head of the Latin Department In 
the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1897-1907 ; Student, University of 
Bonn, summer of 1905 ; Private Tutor. 1892-1909 : Supervisor of Greek. 
Latin, German and History Departments, Brantwood Hall, Bronxville, 
Lawrence Park, N. Y., 1905-07. 

Margaret Grace Skinner, Reader in English. 

Bedford, England. Girton College, University of Cambridge, England, 1902- 
06 : Graduate in Honours, Modern and Mediaeval Languages Tripos, Part I. 
1905: Part IT. 1906. Teacher of English. Rosemary Hall, Greenwich. 
Conn., 1907-10. 

Frances D'Arcy Thompson, M.A., Reader in Latin. 

Dublin. Ireland. Girton College. University of Cambridge. England. 1903-06 : 
Graduate in Honours. First Class, Cambridge Classical Tripos, 1906 ; M.A.. 
Rovnl University of Ireland. 1907 ; Examiner in Latin. Royal University of 
Ireland. 1907-08 : Classical Mistress. High School. Portsmouth. England. 
1906-08 ; Classical Teacher. Rosemary Hall. Greenwich, Conn., 1908-10. 

Edna Aston Shearer, A.B., Reader in English. 

A.B.. Bryn Mawr College. 1904: Junior Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr 
College. 1904-05 : Holder of the President's Fellowship, and Student. Univer- 
sities of Edinburgh and Aberdeen. 1905-06: Fellow in Philosophy. Brvn 
Mawr Collesre 1906-07: Teacher of English in the Baldwin School. Bryn 
Mawr, Pa.. 1907-09. and- Graduate Student. Bryn Mawr College. 1907-08. 

Lily Boss Taylor, A.B.. Reader and Demonstrator in the History of 
Art and Classical Archaeology. 

A.R.. Fniversitv of Wisconsin. 1896. Scholar in Lntin. Brvn Mawr College. 
1906-07: Fellow in Latin. 1907-08: Reader in Latin and Graduate Student. 
1908-09: University of Chicago, Summer Oviarter. 1007 : University of 
^onn. Summer Semester. 1909 : American School of Classical Studies in 
Rome, 1909-10. 

♦Granted leave of absence from December. 1910. to June. 1911. 



10 



Ellwood Austin Welden, Ph.D., N on-Resident Reader in Italian. 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1903. and Ph.D., 1906. Harrison Scholar 
in Indo-European Philology, University of Pennsylvania, 19U3-04 ; Fellow, 
1904-06 ; University of Berlin, Summer Semester, 1905 ; Shattuck Scholar 
in Indie Philology, Harvard University, 1900-07 ; Student in Paris and 
Bologna, 1909-10. 

Gertbude Langden Heeitage, A.M., Demonstrator in Chemistry. 

A.B.. Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M.. 1899. Graduate Student in 
Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1896-97, 189S-1900, and Graduate Student 
in Mathematics and Chemistry, 1897-98. 

Mabel Kathbyn Frehafeb, A.B., Demonstrator in Physics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin, 
1908-09 ; Fellow in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1909-10. 

Abigail Camp Dimon, A.M., Demonstrator in Biology. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1899. Vice-Principal of the High 
School, Clinton, N. Y., 1896-97 ; Assistant Teacher of English in the Utica 
Academy, 1897-98 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99 ; Tutor, 
1900-01 ; Graduate Student and Warden of Radnor Hall, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1901-04 ; Teacher of Science in the Balliol School, Utica, 1904-05. and 
of Science and Mathematics, 1905-08 ; Teacher in the New School, Utica, 
1908-09. 

Anna Bell Lawther, A.B., Secretary of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1897. Assistant Bursar, Bryn Mawr College, 
1898-1900 ; Graduate Student, Brvn Mawr College, 189S-99, 1904-05 ; War- 
den of Merion. Hall, 1904-05. 

Edith Oelady, A.B., Recording Secretary. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Warden of Pembroke Hall West, 1903-05, 
and Warden of Rockefeller Hall, 1905-06 ; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1903-06, 1907-09. 

Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S., Librarian. 

B.L., University of Nebraska, 1885; B.L.S., New York State Library School, 
1892. Acting Librarian and Adjunct Professor of Bibliography, University 
of Nebraska. 1892-97: Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library 
Fconomy, University of Illinois, 1897 ; Classifier, Iowa State University, 
1S98 ; Second Assistant Librarian, Los Angeles Public Library, 1898-99, 
and Librarian, 1900-05. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

Licentiate, British College of Physical Education, 1898, and Member, 1899. 
Gymnasium Mistress, Girls' Grammar School, Bradford, Yorkshire, 1899- 
1900 ; in the Arnold Foster High School, Burnlev, Yorkshire. 1899-1901 ; 
in the High School, Halifax. Yorkshire, 1900-01 ; Head of Private Gym- 
nasium. Ilkley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901 ; Harvard School of Physical Training, 
Summer, 1901 ; Hockey Coach, Vassar College, Wellesley College, Radcliffe 
College. Mt. Holyoke College, Smith College, Bryn Mawr College, Boston 
Normal School of Gymnastics, 1901-04 ; Hockey Coach, Harvard Summer 
School of Gymnastics, 1906. 

Elizabeth Lawbence Gbay, Assistant Director of Athletics and Gym- 
nastics. 

Graduate, Sargent Normal School of Physical Education, Boston, Mass.. 1908 ; 
Student. Gilbert Summer Normal School of Classic Dancing, 1908 : In- 
structor in Gymnastics, Playgrounds, Cambridge, Mass., Summer, 1908, 
1909. 

Mary Ellen Baker, A.B., B.L.S., Head Cataloguer. 

A.B.. Lincoln University, 1900. B.L.S., New York State Library School, 
1908. Assistant in Latin, Missouri Vallev College. 1001-05. and Librarian, 
1902-06. Illinois State Library School, 1906-07 ; New York State Library 
School, 1907-08. 

Bessie Homer Jennings, Assistant Cataloguer. 
Graduate, Drexel Institute Library School, 1900. 

Mary Warren Taylor, Secretary to the Director of Athletics and 
Gymnastics. 



11 



Thomas F. Branson, M.D., Attending Physician of the College. 

A.B., Haverford College, 1889 ; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1892. 
Attending Physician, Bryn Mawr Hospital. 

Anne Heath Thomas, A.M., M.D., Visiting Physician of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1897, and A.M., 1898. M.D., Woman's Medical 
College of Pennsylvania, 1905. Graduate Scholar in Physics and Biology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1897-98 ; Teacher of Chemistry in the State Normai 
School, Trenton. N. J., 1898-1902 ; Student. Woman's Medical College of 
Pennsylvania, 1902-05 : Interne, Woman's Hospital of Philadelphia, 1905- 
06 ; Resident at the Evening Dispensary for Working Women and Girls, 
Baltimore. Md., and Graduate Student in Medicine, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1906-07 : Physician, Registrar and Assistant in Clinic in the Wo- 
man's Hospital, Philadelphia, and Assistant in Clinic in the Hospital of the 
Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1907-OS : Instructor in Thera- 
peutics and Physical Diagnosis. Woman's Medical College, and Assistant 
Visiting Physician, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09. 

Helen Mtjbphy, M.D., Examining Oculist. 

M.D.. Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1893 ; Assistant Demon- 
strator in Histology, Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1894-96 : 
Instructor in Materia Medica, 1896-1902 ; Instructor in Diseases of the 
Eve. Philadelphia Polyclinic and College for Graduates in Medicine, 
1895-97. 

The following physicians have consented to serve as consultants 
in special cases : 

Ella B. Bveritt, M.D.. 1807 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Consultant 
Gynecologist. 

John M. Musser, M.D., 1927 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Consult- 
ant Physician. 

George de Schweinitz, M.D., 1705 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Con- 
sultant Oculist. 

Robert G. Le Conte, M.D., 1625 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. Consult- 
ant Surgeon. 

Francis R. Packard, M.D., 304 S. Nineteenth Street, Philadelphia. 
Consultant Aurist. 

James K. Young, M.D.. 222 S. Sixteenth Street, Philadelphia, Con- 
sultant Orthopaedist. 



Report of the Assistant to the President. 

To the President: Madam, 

1 have the honor to submit to you a statistical report on 
the students of Bryn Mawr College for the academic year 
1909-10, a statistical report of the workings of the regula- 
tions of the Directors and Faculty, and an account of matters 
which were administered through my office. 

The entire number of students enrolled during the year 
was 425. There were 87 graduate students, including fellows. 
The number of graduates was over 20 per cent of the whole 
number of students. 

/. Comparative Table of Number of Graduate and Under- 
graduate Students from 1885 to 1910. 

Graduate Undergraduate Total 

Year. Students. Students. Number. 

1885-86 8 36 44 

1886-87 . ., 10 54 64 

1887-88 8 70 78 

1888-89 16 100 116 

1889-90 s 22 100 122 

1890-91 12 120 132 

1891-92 27 142 169 

1892-93 34 168 202 

1893-94 43 200 243 

1894-95 49 234 283 

1895-96 52 246 298 

1896-97 46 243 289 

1897-98 49 275 324 

1898-99 67 287 354 

1899-1900 53 334 387 

1900-01 48 348 396 

1901-02 53 383 436 

1902-03 '.70 377 447 

1903-04 62 384 446 

1904-05 63 378 441 

(13) 



14 



Graduate Undergraduate 

Year. Students. Students. 

1905-06 79 377 

1906-07 75 362 

1907-08 72 348 

1908-09 86 334 

1909-10 , 87 337 



Total 
Number. 

456 
437 
420 
420 
424 



II. Denominational Affiliations of Graduate and Under- 
graduate Students. 

Affiliations. Graduate. Undergraduate. Total. 

Episcopalian 25 130 155 

Presbyterian 15 82 97 

Congregational 9 14 23 

Unitarian 4 19 23 

Friends 6 13 19 

Baptist 3 14 17 

Methodist 5 10 15 

Jewish 2 12 14 

Roman Catholic 1 9 10 

Lutheran 4 4 8 

Christian Science .... S 8 

Dutch Eef ormed 3 3 

German Reformed ... 1 2 3 

Jewish Reformed .... 2 2 

Disciples 1 1 

Ethical Culture 1 1 

Evangelical 1 1 

Moravian 1 1 

Protestant Reformed 1 1 

Reformed Episcopal 1 1 

Universalist 1 1 

Not stated 5 3 8 

No denominational af- 
filiation 3 9 12 



87 



337 



424 



15 

STATISTICS OF GRADUATE STUDENTS IN 1909-10. 
III. Geographical Distribution of Graduate Students. 

The eighty-seven graduate students enrolled during the 
year came from the following states and countries: 

Students. Percentage. 

Pennsylvania 29 33.34 

New York 5 5.75 

Indiana 4 4.58 

Missouri , 4 4.58 

Ohio 4 4.58 

Connecticut 3 3.45 

Massachusetts . 3 3.45 

New Jersey 3 3.45 

Rhode Island 3 3.45 

Illinois ' 2 2.29 

Michigan 2 2.29 

North Carolina 2 2.29 

Arkansas 1 1.15 

Iowa 1 1.15 

Kansas 1 1.15 

Kentucky 1 1.15 

Maryland 1 1.15 

Minnesota . 1 1.15 

Mississippi 1 1.15 

Nebraska 1 1.15 ■ 

South Dakota 1 1.15 

Texas 1 1.15 

Canada 6 6.90 

Germany 4 . 4.58 

England . 2 2.29 

Japan 1 1.15 

Total 87 100 per cent. 

These eighty-seven graduate students may be classified 
as follows: 
Non-resident, holding European Fellowships and studying 

abroad 3 



16 



Resident fellows 12 

Graduate scholars, British . . ., 2 

Graduate scholars, German 4 

Graduate scholars 24 

Members of college staff 8 

Graduate students 34 

87 
Fifty-six resided 'in the halls of residence, twenty-eight 
resided in Philadelphia or the neighborhood, and three were 
studying abroad. 

IV. Number of Years of Graduate Study. 

25 in their first year of graduate study. 
24 in their second year of graduate study. 
17 in their third year of graduate study. 
10 in their fourth year of graduate study. 

5 in their fifth year of graduate study. 

4 in their sixth year of graduate study. 

2 in their eighth year of graduate study. 

87 

V. Studies Elected by 8Jf Graduate Students in Residence. 

Under each subject all the graduate students electing 
work in that subject are included. 

Students. Percentage. 

English 27 32.26 

Philosophy and Psychology 16 19.05 

German and Teutonic Philology. . 15 17.86 

Latin 15 17.86 

Art and Archaeology 12 14.31 

Greek 10 11.91 

Chemistry 9 10.71 

French 8 9.52 

Biology 7 8.33 

Physics 7 8.33 



17 



Students. Percentage. 

Economics and Politics . 5 5.95 

Mathematics 5 5.95 

Spanish 4 4.76 

Geology. 3 3.57 

History 3 3.57 

Italian 3 3.57 

Semitic Languages 3 3.57 

VI. Major Studies of m Graduate Students. 

Each student credited to a subject is doing full graduate 
work and is devoting one-half or more of her working time to 
("he study of that special subject. 

English 15 

Latin 12 

German and Teutonic Philology 7 

Chemistry 6 

Greek 4 

Philosophy and Psychology 4 

Romance Languages 3 

Semitic Languages 3 

Physics 3 

Biology 3 

Art and Archaeology 2 

Economics 1 

Mathematics 1 

Geology 1 

VII. Occupations of 81 Graduate Students. 

Of the 87 graduate students 44 have already taught or 
are teaching. Fifteen of these have taught or have acted as 
assistants or demonstrators in colleges and universities, one 
has been a college secretary, two, college wardens, and 40 
have not taught or held any position. Fifteen of these 40 
are planning to teach, one is to study medicine, the remainder 
have not stated their intentions. 



18 



STATISTICS OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 
IN 1909-10. 

VI II. Geographical Distribution of Undergraduate Students. 

The 337 undergraduate students enrolled during the 
past year came from the following states and countries : 

Students. Percentage. 

Pennsylvania . . 115 34.13 

New York 57 16.92 

Illinois 36 10.68 

Maryland -." 21 6.23 

Massachusetts 15 4.15 

New Jersey 11 3.26 

Ohio 8 2.37 

Texas . 7 2.08 

Connecticut 5 1.48 

District of Columbia 4 1.19 

Indiana 3 .89 

Iowa 3 .89 

Kentucky , 3 .89 

Minnesota 3 .89 

Missouri , 3 .89 

Nebraska 3 .89 

New r Hampshire 3 .89 

Oregon 3 .89 

Khode Island . 3 .89 

Virginia 3 .89 

Alabama . 2 .59 

Delaware 2 .59 

Georgia 2 .59 

Louisiana 2 .59 

Maine 2 .59 

Michigan 2 .59 

Wisconsin 2 .59 

Arkansas 1 .30 

California 1 .30 

Colorado 1 .30 

Kansas 1 .30 



19 

Students. Percentage. 

North Carolina 1 .30 

Wyoming 1 .30 

Hawaii 2 .59 

England 1 .30 

France 1 .30 

Japan 2 .59 

Turkey , 1 .30 

Canada 1 .30 

Total 337 100 

These 337 undergraduates are classified as follows: 318 
resident, 19 non-resident ; 329 candidates for a degree, 8 
hearers. 

Of the 329 candidates for a degree 72 were seniors and 
of these 2 completed the work for the degree in February, 
3 deferred graduation, and 67 graduated in June; 65 were 
juniors, 86 sophomores, and 106 freshmen. 

In addition to those who graduated '38 undergraduates 
left the college, 8 during the year, 30 at its close, for the fol- 
lowing reasons : 

On account of illness 11 

Needed at home 7 

Came for one or two years only 4 

To be married 4 

To travel abroad 3 

For financial reasons 2 

To attend a college nearer home 2 

Not stated, probably low grades 2 

On account of mother's illness 1 

To study music 1 

Not stated 1 

38 

The students who left were members of the following 
classes: seniors 1 ; juniors 6 ; sophomores 16 ; freshmen 15. 



20 



STATISTICS OF SENIOR CLASS (CLASS OF 1910). 
At Commencement, June, 1910, the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts was conferred on 69 students, two of whom completed 
the requirements in February, 1910. Their courses may be 
analysed as follows : 

IX. Length of Course of Senior Class. 

Number of Number of Number 

Date of Entering Semesters Spent Semesters Absent Graduated 

College. in College. from College. in 1910. 

October, 1906 8 None 55 

October, 1904 8 3 1* 

October, 1905 . 10 None 2' 

October, 1905 9 1 3 

October, 1905 9 None 1* 

October, 1905 8 2 2 

February, 1906 9 None 1 

February, 1906 8 1 1 



October, 1907 6 None 



-3| 



Eighty-six students entered the college as freshmen in 
October, 1906. Of these 55, or 63.96 per cent, graduated 
after the regular four year course. 

The average age of the class graduating in June was 
22 years and 7.4 months. 

The median age of the class graduating in June was 
22 years and 2 months. 

The average age of the class graduating in February 
was 33 years and 11 months. 

The median age of the class graduating in February was 
33 years and 11 months. 

Average age at graduation of classes graduating in 

June, 1907 22 years, 7.6 months. 

June, 1908 22 years, Q.Q months. 

June, 1909 22 years, 8.0 months. 

June, 1910 . 22 years, 7.4 months. 

* Completed work for degree in February, 1910. 
t Entered with advanced standing from other colleges. 



21 



X. Groups Elected 

History and Economics 

and Politics 20 

Latin and German 7 

Greek and Latin 6 

Latin and Mathematics . 3 
Economics and Politics 

and Philosophy 3 

Greek and English 2 

English and Philosophy . 2 
German and Spanish ... 2 
Latin, Italian and Span- 
ish 1 



by I lie Senior Class. 

Latin and French 6 

Latin and English 4 

Mathematics and Physics 4 
Chemistry and Biology. . 4 
English and German ... 1 
German and French .... 1 
Mathematics and Chem- 
istry, 1 

Mathematics and Geology 1 

Physics and Biology .... 1 

69 



lows 



Arranged in order the major subjects chosen are as fol- 



Latin 27 Chemistry 5 

Economics and Politics . 23 Philosophy 5 

History 20 Physics 5 

German 11 Biology 5 

English 9 Spanish 2 

Mathematics 9 Italian and Spanish .... 1 

Greek 8 Geology 1 

French 7 

138 

STATISTICS OF THE FRESHMAN CLASS (CLASS OF 

1913). 

The Freshman class numbered 104, 103 entering in 
October, 1909, and 1 in February, 1910. Ninety-nine were 
resident and five lived at home. 



XI. Table of Conditions of Freshman Class. 

Entering in Entering in 
October. February. 

Clear 32 

Clear except punctuation or spelling. 21 

Conditioned in 1 section 9 1 

Conditioned in 2 sections . 11 



22 



Entering in Entering in 
October. February. 

Conditioned in 3 sections 12 

Conditioned in 4 sections 10 

Conditioned in 5 sections 5 

Honorable dismissal from other col- 
leges 3 

Total 103 1 

Freshmen entering the college on examination and with- 
out conditions, 32 per cent ; entering on examination and 
with conditions in punctuation or spelling only, 21 per cent ; 
entering on examination with no conditions except in punc- 
tuation or spelling, 53 per cent; Freshmen conditioned in 
spelling, 4; conditioned in punctuation, 43. 

XII. Comparative Table of Percentage of Freshmen Enter- 
ing Without Matriculation Conditions, October, 
1890— October, 1909. 

This table includes only those entering in October of 
each year and takes no account of conditions in punctuation 
and spelling. Up to 1897 the proportion of students enter- 
ing free from conditions to all the entering students, includ- 
ing honorable dismissal students, was taken. After 1897 the 
students who entered on honorable dismissal were not counted 
in taking the percentage. It is therefore misleading to com- 
pare the two sets of percentages. 

In 1890 25.0 % In 1900 38.78% 

In 1891 22.8 % In 1901 40.52% 

In 1892 32.0 % In 1902 37.97% 

In 1893 23.1 % In 1903 35.29% 

In 1894 19.3 % In 1904 50.00% 

In 1895 19.0 % In 1905 54.81% 

In 1896 21.8 % In 1906 53.48% 

In 1897 31.8 % In 1907 56.48% 

In 1898 26.9 % In 1908 66.29% 

In 1899 31.73% In 1909 53.00% 



23 

XIII. Removal of Matriculation Conditions. 

Omitting conditions in punctuation and spelling 98 
conditions were incurred: 

18 were passed off in November, 1909. 
4 were passed off in February, 1910. 
21 were passed off in March, 1910. 
12 were passed off in May, 1910. 
14 were passed off in September, 1910. 

Twenty-four were not passed off before the beginning of the 
sophomore year. Six students with entrance conditions not 
passed off left college during or at the close of their freshman 
year. 

XIV. Table of Preparatory Schools that Prepared 
100 Freshmen. 

Arranged according to sections of country in which the 
college offers matriculation scholarships. Three Freshmen 
entered by honorable dismissal from other colleges. 

Neiv England States: 

Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 9 

The Winsor School, Boston, Mass t. . 3 

Miss Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston, Mass. 2 

Wykeham Rise School, Washington, Conn 2 

Friends' Academy, ISTew Bedford, Mass 1 

Gilbert High School, Winsted, Conn 1 

Keene High School, ¥. H 1 

MacDuffie School, Springfield, Mass 1 

Miss May's School, Boston, Mass 1 

Mt. Ida School for Girls, Newton, Mass 1 

The Misses Smith's School, Cambridge, Mass 1 

23 

First Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of Miss 
Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston, Mass. 



24 

Second Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the 
Gilbert High School, Winsted, Conn. 

.New York, New Jersey, and Delaware: 

'Brearley School, New York City 3 

Gordon-Winston School, New York City. 3 

Dwight School, Englewood, 1ST. J 2 

The Veltin School, New York City 2 

Miss Beard's School, Orange, 1ST. J 1 

Benjamin Deane School, New York City 1 

The High School, Flushing, Long Island 1 

Friends' School, Wilmington, Del 1 

The High School, Glen Eidge, N. J . 1 

St, Agatha's School, New York City 1 

St. Agnes' School, Albany, N. Y 1 

The High School, Saratoga Springs, N. Y 1 

Miss Spence's School, New York City 1 

State Model School, Trenton, N. J 1 

|] 20 

First Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the 
Gordon- Winston School, New York City. 

Second Matriculation Scholarship won by. pupil of the 
Brearley School, New York City. 

Western States: 

Chicago Latin School, Chicago, 111 2 

College Preparatory School, Cincinnati, 1 

Eastern High School, Detroit, Mich 1 

The High School, Evanston, 111 1 

Girton School, Winnetka, 111 ■ 1 

Laurel School, Cleveland, 1 

Mary Institute, St. Louis, Mo 1 

Milwaukee Downer College, Milwaukee, Wis 1 

Portland Academy, Portland, Ore 1 



25 



Stanley Hall, Minneapolis, Minn 1 

The Yeatman High School, St. Louis, Mo 1 

12 

First Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the 
Portland Academy, Portland, Ore. 

Second Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the 
Mary Institute, St. Louis, Mo. 

Pennsylvania and Southern States: 

The Girls' High School, Philadelphia 11 

The Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Penna. . 7 

The Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia 4 

The Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md 4 

The Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Penna 4 

The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Penna 2 

The Gordon School, Philadelphia 2 

Miss Honey's School, Bala, Penna 2 

Allegheny County Academy, Cumberland, Md 1 

Cowart Hall, Dallas, Tex 1 

Friends' Central School, Philadelphia 1 

Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh, Penna 1 

Margaret Allen School, Birmingham, Ala 1 

National Park Seminary, Forest Glen, Md 1 

Oldfield, Glencoe, Md. .' 1 

The High School, Paducah, Ky. • 1 

Pennsylvania State College, State College, Penna. . . 1 

The High School, Pittsburgh, Penna 1 

St. Mary's College, Dallas! Tex 1 

The High School, West Pittston, Penna 1 

Wilkesbarre Institute, Wilkesbarre, Penna. 1 

The Willard School, Berlin, Germany 1 

Wissahickon Heights School, Chestnut Hill, Phila. . 1 

Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, Penna 1 

52 



26 



First Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the 
Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Second Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of the 
Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. 

Private tuition 3 

Honorable dismissal from other colleges 3 



113 



In the above list duplicates are included, some students 
having received their preparation at two or more schools, and 
also by private tuition. 

XV. Preparation Received in Private or Public Schools. 

Entered in In 

October. February. 

Private Schools 59 

Private Schools and Private Tuition 15 1 

Private Tuition 2 

Public Schools 18 

Private and Public Schools 3 

Public Schools, Private Schools and 

Private Tuition 3 

Honorable Dismissal 3 



103 



Percentage of freshmen entering by examination in 
October who have received preparation for college only in 
private schools or by private tuition equals 76 per cent; the 
percentage of those who studied only in public schools is 
18.0. 



2T 



XVI. A Comparative Table of the Geographical Distribu- 
tion of the Freshman Class, 190 k to 1009. 



States and Countries. 


Per cent of Freshman Classes in 




1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


Pennsylvania 

New York 


35.4 
16.7 
6.3 
2.1 
4.2 
2.1 
3.1 

2.1 

2.1 
1.0 

2.1 

2.1 

3.1 
3.1 
1.0 

1.0 

2.1 

2.1 
3.1 
2.1 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 


37.8 
12.6 
5.4 
8.1 
6.3 
3.6 
1.8 

1.8 
.9 

1.8 

.9 
.9 

1.8 

.9 

.9 

1.8 

1.8 
.9 

.9 

.9 

.9 

.9 


33.0 

18.2 

10.6 

3.2 

7.4 
4.4 
5.3 

1.1 
1.1 

2.2 

1.1 
1.1 

2.2 

.'.' 

1.1 

1.1 

2.2 

i.l 
i.l 

i.l 
i.l 

i.l 


29.2 
17.7 
135 
4.2 
6.3 
3.1 
3.1 

■ ' 

1.0 
1.0 

1.0 
2.1 

1.0 
1.0 

1.0 

1.0 

3.1 
1.0 
2.1 

1.0 
1.0 

1.0 

2.1 

2.1 


27.7 
16.0 
14.9 
9.6 
1.1 
1.1 
3.2 

1.1 

1.1 
2.2 

1.1 

1.1 

2.2 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 

2.2 

1.1 

1.1 

1.1 

1.1 
3.2 

1.1 

1.1 
1.1 


35.9 

18.9 


Illinois 

Maryland 


9.0 
5.0 


Massachusetts 


7.0 


New Jersey 


4.0 


Ohio 


2.0 


Alabama 


2.0 


Arkansas 




California 

Colorado 




Connecticut 

Delaware 


2.0 
1.0 


District of Columbia 


1.0 


Florida 




Georgia 


1.0 


Indiana 




Iowa 




Kansas 




Kentucky 


1.0 


Louisiana 




Maine 




Michigan 


1.0 


Minnesota 


2.0 


Mississippi 




Missouri 


2.0 


Montana 




Nebraska 




Nevada 




New Hampshire 


1.0 


North Carolina 




Oregon 


1.0 


Rhode Island 




South Carolina 




Tennessee 




Texas 


3.0 


Virginia 


1.0 


Wisconsin 




Wyoming 

France 




Hawaii 


1.0 


Japan 


1.0 


England 




Canada 


1 







In 1909 19 states and the District of Columbia, Canada, 
Hawaii, and Japan are represented. 



28 



XVII. Denominational Affiliations of the Freshman Class. 



Episcopalian 42 

Presbyterian 15 

Unitarian '7 

Baptist 6 

Christian Science 5 

Friends 4 

Congregationalist 4 

Methodist 4 

Jewish 3 



Lutheran 2 

Evangelical 1 

German Reformed 1 



Jewish Reformed . . 

Roman Catholic . . . 

No denominational 

iation 



affil- 



104 



XVIII. Average and Median Ages of the Freshman Class. 

Years. Months. 

Average age of class entering in October 18 7 

Median age of class entering in October 18 7 

Average age of class entering in February 19 3 

Median age of class entering in February 19 3 

Average age (excluding honorable dismissal stu- 
dents) 18 7 

Median age (excluding honorable dismissal stu- 
dents) 18 7 



XIX. Average Ages of Entering (lasses Since 1S8-5. 



Year. 


Average Age. 


Median Age. 


Year. 


Average Age. 


Median Age. 


1885 


22.03 


18.87 


1898 


19.08 


19.58 


1886 


18.31 


18.00 


1899 


18.75 


18.58 


1887 


19.24 


19.00 


1900 


19.00 


18.91 


1888 


19.02 


18.2 


1901 


18.58 


18.58 


1889 


19.19 


18.10 


1902 


18.83 


18.62 


1890 


19.35 


18.11 


1903 


18.50 


18.50 


1891 


19.46 


18.07 


1904 


18.92 


18.92 


1S92 


19.54 


18.11 


1905 


18.66 


18.66 


1893 


19.78 


19.00 


1906 


18.75 


18.50 


1894 


19.28 


19.01 


1907 


18.66 


IS. 33 


1895 


19.44 


18.08 


1908 


18.50 


18.33 


1896 


18.97 


18.10 


1909 


1858 


18.58 


1897 


18.90 


18.75 









29 



XX. Occupations of Parents of Freshman Class. 
Professions. 

Lawyers ( 2 Judges) 1 *> 

Physicians (1 Surgeon in Navy) 7 

Teachers (1 College President, 3 Professors) . . 7 

Clergymen 4 

Technical Engineers 3 

Diplomat 1 

Inventor 1 



39 



Business. 

Merchants 18 

Manufacturers 8 

Business Officers and Employees 10 

Bankers '. 4 

Publishers (1 Proprietor of Newspaper) .... 3 

Insurance 3 

Eeal Estate 3 

Brokers 2 

Farmers , 2 

Accountant 1 

Capitalist 1 

Auditor 1 

Journalist 1 

— .57 
Not stated (of these five are dead) 8 



104 



Action of the Merit Laiv. 

In the report for 1908-09 it was stated that in June, 
1909, four Students remained on probation, two in the Class 
of 1910 and two in the Class of 1911. 

The two students in the Class of 1910 graduated in 
June, 1910, and the other two remain at college and expect 
to graduate in 1911. No students came under the action of 



30 



the five year rule in 1909-10, and no students were excluded 
from the degree. Thirty-six freshmen, fourteen sophomores 
and one senior had more than half their hours under merit 
in June, 1910, and were prevented from taking- part in any 
College entertainments requiring preparation, from serving 
as officers of any clubs or associations and from doing any 
remunerative work connected with the College. 

Since the five year rule came into action for the Class 
of 1907, twenty-five students have been placed on probation ; 
of these seven have graduated, three have been excluded from 
the degree, thirteen have left college and two remain on pro- 
bation. Two hundred and ninety-one students have gradu- 
ated in the four classes, 1907, 1908, 1909, and 1910. Thus 
about 1 per cent have been excluded from a degree and a little 
over 8 per cent have been placed on probation. 

Registration of Attendance on the First Day of Each 
Semester and Before and After Vacations. 

Students are required to register eight times in the col- 
lege year, as shown by the following table, in order to insure 
regular attendance before and after the vacations. Cases of 
failure to register are investigated by the office and reported 
to the Petition Committee of the Faculty. 

XXI. Table of Cases of Failure to Register. 

Failed to register 
on account of for other 

illness. reasons. 

Beginning of the college year 1 10 

Before the Thanksgiving vacation . . 9 1 

After the Thanksgiving vacation . . 8 3 

Before the Christmas vacation .... 10 4 

After the Christmas vacation 13 4 

Beginning of the second semester . . 5 3 

. Before the Easter vacation 24 2 

After the Easter vacation 13 3 

Total 83 30 



31 



Fines. 

Fines are imposed for failure to register courses in the 
appointed period and for failure to return course books to 
the office at the given time at the end of each semester. 

In the first semester 8 students and in the second sem- 
ester 13 students failed to register during the appointed 
period; these fines amounted to $105. Three students handed 
in their course books late; these fines amounted to $15. A 
fee of one dollar is charged for each change made in the 
course after it is definitely registered. Fifty-three students 
changed their courses and the fees amounted to $62. This 
money is used for the purchase of books for the library. 

College Publications. 

The College has issued during the course of the year, 
1909-10, the following publications: 

Bryn Mawr College Calendar. 

Academic Buildings and Halls of Residence, Plans and 
Descriptions. Volume II, Part 4. pp. 42. No- 
vember, 1909. 
Register of Alumnae and Former Students. Volume 

III, Part 1. pp. 152. January, 1910. 
Graduate Courses. Volume III, Part 2. pp. 121. 

March, 1910. 
Undergraduate and Graduate Courses. Volume III, 

Part 3. pp. 182. 2 inserts. May, 1910. 
Supplement, Competitive Matriculation Scholarships, 
pp. 10. November, 1909. 
Bryn Mawr College Finding List. pp. 31. October 15, 1909. 
Bryn Mawr College Class Lists, First Semester, pp. 26. 

November 15, 1909. 
Bryn Mawr College Class Lists, Second Semester, pp. 26. 

March 15, 1910. 
Bryn Mawr College, Annual Report of the President, 1908- 

09. pp. 100. December 15, 1909. 
Bryn Mawr College, Brief Financial Statement, pp. 8. 
March 1, 1909. 



32 



Brvn Mawr College, Appeal for a Conditional Gift of 

$250,000. 
Appeal for Bryn Mawr's Endowment. pp. 15. March 30, 

1910. 
The. Bryn Mawr Spelling Book, by. Georgiana Goddard King, 

A.M. pp. 48. October, 1909. 
Circulars in regard to Fellowships and Scholarships. 
Miscellaneous Circulars, Notices, Blanks, etc. 
Throngh the Comptroller's Office : 

Brvn Mawr College, Financial Report, pp. 28. No- 
vember, 1909. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Isabel Maddison, 
Assistant to the President. 



Report of the Dean of the College. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to present the following report for the 
academic year, 1909-10. In September my office was moved 
from the Library to Taylor Hall. The new office is larger 
and more commodious than the old and the work has been 
greatly facilitated by the change. A slight change was made 
in the advisory divisions for the year. The Assistant to the 
President advised one-fourth of every class in college and 
I acted as adviser to the remaining 253 undergraduates. 
The registration of illness and attendance at lectures has 
been kept as usual in my office from records sent in weekly 
by the wardens of the halls and the members of the faculty. 

Record of Illness. 

First semester: Number of undergraduate students . 332 

Number reporting illness 113 

Per cent reporting illness 34.03 

Second semester: Number of undergraduate students . 330 

Number reporting illness 123 

Per cent reporting illness 37.27 

Semester I. Number of excuses handed in. 



Number of 


Number of 


Number of 


Number of 


Excuses. 


Students. 


Excuses. 


Students. 


1 . . . 


. .. 63 


4 .... 


... 7 


2 


...30 


5 ... . 


.. 1 


3 . .. 


...12 







Total 113 



Aggregate number of excuses, 187. 

33 



34 



Number of 


Number of 


Number of 


Number of 


Days of Illness. 


Students. 


Days of Illness. 


Students. 


1 ... 


...37 


8 


.. 3 


2 . .. 


...19 


9 


.. 2 


3 ... 


...16 


10 


.. 2 


4 .... 


...11 


11 


.. 1 


5 


,. . 5 


12 


.. 2 


6 


... 9 


20 .... 


. . 2 


7 . . 


, . 4 






Total 


..113 



Aggregate number of days of illness, 411. 



Semester II. Number of excuses handed in. 



lumber of 


Number of 


Number of 


Number of 


Excuses. 


Students. 


Excuses. 


Students. 


1 . .. 


...67 


4 


.. 8 


2 . .. 


...37 


5 


. . 2 


3 ... 


... 9 







Total 

Aggregate number of excuses, 210. 



123 



Number of 


Number of 


Number of 


Number of 


Days of Illness. 


Students. 


Days of Illness. 


Students. 


1 


.. 34 


9 


.. 3 


2 


. . 25 


11 


.. 3 


3 


. . 12 


12 


. . 1 


4 


.. 12 


13 


.. 1 


5 


.. 11 


17 .... 


.. 1 


6 


.. 7 


18 


.. 1 


7 .... 


. . 3 


19 


.. 1 


8 


. . 8 







Total 



123 



Aggregate number of days of illness, 489. 

The details of illnesses are given in the doctor's report 
for the year. Dr. Anne H. Thomas has been in her office 
in Merion Hall every day, except Sunday, from four to six. 



35 



The comparative freedom of the college from any epidemics 
was due, I think, to Dr. Thomas's daily, office hour and the 
prompt attention given to all cases of illness by Miss Hartwig, 
the head nurse. 



Semester I. 



Record of Attendance. 



Total Number 




Total Number 




of Cuts per 


Number of 


of Cuts per 


Number of 


Student. 


Students. 


Student. 


Students. 


1 


. . 9 


23 


. . 4 


2 . 


. . 20 


25 


. . 4 


3 


. . 20 


26 


. . 2 


4 


. . 10 


27 .... 


. . 1 


5 


. . 16 


28 


. . 4 


6 


. . 20 


29 


. . 1 


7 .... 


. . 11 


31 


. . 1 


8 


. . 25 


32 


. . 1 


9 


29. 


33 


.. 2 


10 


. . 21 


34 


. . 1 


11 


. . 10 


35 


. . 1 


12 


. . 21 


36 


. . 1 


13 


. . 15 


37 .... 


. . 1 


11 


. . 9 


38 


. . 1 


15 


.. 8 


39 


. . 1 


16 


. . 8 


40 


. . 1 - 


17 .... 


. . 9 


46 


. . 1 


18 


.. 7 


47 .... 


. . 1 


19 


. . 10 


52 


. . 1 


20 


. . 4 


55 


. . 1 


21 • 


. . 3 


60 


. . 1 


22 


. . 1 







Total 
Aggregate number of cuts, 3,758. 



314 



Average number of cuts per student, 11.9. 



36 



Semester I. 








Number of 




Number of 




Unexcused Cuts 


Number of 


Unexcused Cuts 


Number of 


per Student. 


Students. 


per Student. 


Students. 


1 


. . 10 


17 .... 


. . 2 


2 


. . 20 


18 


. . 4 


3 


. . 28 


19 


. . 6 


4 


. . 17 


20 


. . 4 


5 


. . 20 


21 


. . 5 


6 


. . 24 


22 


. . 2 


7 .... 


. . 18 


23 


. . 4 


8 


. . 26 


24 


. . 2 


9 


. . 26 


25 


. . 2 


10 


.. 17 


27 .... 


. . 1 


11 


. . 20 


*28 


. . 1 


12 


. . 11 


29 


. . 1 


13 


. . 14 


32 


. . 1 


14 


. . 14 


33 


. . 1 


15 


. . 8 


*35 


. . 1 


16 


4 






Total 


. .314 



Aggregate number of unexcused cuts, 2,931. 
Average number of unexcused cuts per student, 9.3. 



Semester II. 




Total Number 




of Cuts per 


Number of 


Student. 


Students 


1 


.. 12 


2 


.. 14 


3 


. . 15 


4 


.. 13 


5 


. . 9 


6 


.. 10 


7 .... 


.. 12 


8 


.. 18 



Total Number 

of Cuts per 

Student. 

9 . .. 

10 ... 

11 ... 

12 ... 
13 

14 ... 

15 ... 

16 ... 



Number of 
Students. 

. . 18 

. 13 

. . 16 

. . 19 

, . 11 

. . 13 

,. 7 

. 11 



* On account of illness, but no regular registration. 



37 



Total Number 




Total Number 




of Cuts per 


Number of 


of Cuts per 


Number of 


Student. 


Students. 


Student. 


Students. 


17 .... 


. . 11 


35 


.. 4 


18 


. . 4 


36 


. . 4 


19 


. . 8 


37 .... 


. . 1 


20 


. . 6 


38 


. . 1 


21 


.. 7 


39 


. . 2 


22 


. . 8 


40 


. . 1 


23 


. . 4 


42 


. . 2 


25 


. . 5 


44 


. . 1 


26 


. . 5 


45 


. . 4 


27 .... 


. . 5 


46 


. . 1 


28 


2 


48 


. . 1 


29 


. . 4 


50 


. . 3 


30 


. . 3 


54 


. . 1 


31 


. . 2 


61 


. . 1 


32 


. . 1 


62 


. . 1 


33 


. . 1 


89 


. . 1 


34 


. . 2 







Total 



318 



Aggregate number of cuts, 4,860. 

Average number of cuts per student, 15.3. 



Semester II. 

Number of 
Unexcused Cuts Number of 
per Student. Students. 

1 13 

2 10 

. 3 13 

4 14 

5 18 

6 11 

7 22 

8 18 

9 17 

10 23 



Number of 
Unexcused Cuts Number of 

per Student. Students. 

11 20 

12 19 

13 17 

14 9 

15 4 

16 12 

17 11 

18 7 

19 8 

20 3 



38 



rotal Number 




Total Number 




of Cuts per 


Number of 


of Cuts per 


Number of 


Student. 


Students. 


Student. 


Students. 


21 ... 


. .. 4 


35 


... . 1 


22 


... 7 


36 .... 


. . 1 


23 . . . 


.. . 3 


38 


. . 1 


24 


o 


*40 


. . 1 


25 


, . . 5 


*41 


. . 1 


26 . . . . 


. . 4 


*42 


. . 2 


27 


2 


44 


. . 1 


28 


. . 1 


45 


2 


29 


. . 1 


49 


. . 1 


30 


. . 3 


-j-61 .... 


. . 1 


31 


2 


189 


. . 1 


32 


. . 1 







Total 



!18 



Aggregate number of unexcused cuts, 4,047. 
Average number of cuts per student, 12.72. 

Pursuing the policy of keeping in touch with the pre- 
paratory schools, I have spoken during the academic year at 
the following schools : 

The Collegiate Preparatory School, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
The Bartholomew Clifton School, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
The ThurstomGleim School, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Miss Madeira's School, Washington, D. C. 
The Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 
Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 
The Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. 

Respectfully submitted , 

Marion Reilly. 
Dean of the College. 



* On account of illness, but no formal registration made, 
t Student suspended for 4 weeks. 
t Student in California. 



Report of the Secretary to the Faculty. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to report that during the academic year 
1909-10 the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College has taken action 
in matters not of a routine character as follows : 

December 20, 1909. Voted to adopt an alphabetical 
order of seating in classes having proctors. 

Voted to revise the regulation concerning admission to 
collegiate courses so as not to exclude from courses in Science 
or in History, students having matriculation conditions in 
those subjects. 

March 17, 1910. On recommendation of the committee 
to select candidates for the graduate European fellowships, 
voted that holders of the graduate scholarships for British and 
German women should not be eligible for the European 
fellowships. 

April 2, 1910. Voted to permit Archaeology to be com- 
bined with Greek or Latin as a group. 

After much discussion, voted to permit Comparative Lit- 
erature, a course about to be established, to make a group 
with any. modem language provided the department of the 
modern language in question assent to the combination. 

April 28, 1910. On recommendation of a committee 
appointed to consider the question, the Faculty voted to make 
no change in the existing regulations as to eligibility for the 
two European fellowships open to graduates, as some had 
proposed, but to keep one of them for students in the first year 
of graduate study at Bryn Mawr College and the other for 
students of longer residence. 

A recommendation of special conferences concerning the 
qualifications of prospective candidates for these fellowships 
was tabled. 

A committee on the codification of quizzes, after long 
consideration of the problem, presented an extended report 
and proposed a scheme of systematized quizzes for trial dur- 

39 



40 

ing a period of two years. This scheme with a minor verbal 
change was adopted. 

The Faculty instructed and authorized its Schedule 
Committee to re-arrange the examinations in Private Read- 
ing.- 

At the request of the department the Faculty approved 
the adoption of new requirements in Latin for admission ac- 
cording to the plan of the Classical Association. 

May 20, 1910. Asked if it would accept a dissertation 
written in French the Faculty referred the question to the 
Council. 

During the year the Faculty also held oral examinations 
for five candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
(A. M. Boring, G. P. Reynolds, L. Dudley, H. H. Nichols, 
and E. S. Ogden). 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph W. Wakben, 

Secretary to the Faculty. 



Report of the [Secretary. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
work of the secretary's office during the year 1909-10. 

The correspondence with the parents of prospective stu- 
dents, with the candidates themselves and with the teachers 
preparing candidates for the college was done in the secre- 
tary's office. Prospective students were advised to apply 
early for rooms and applications have been received for the 
next seven years and one for the year 1929. 

Three hundred and sixty-five students were assigned 
rooms in the halls of residence. The quieter single rooms 
in all the halls except in Meriori Hall are set apart for 
graduate students. One-fourth of all the other rooms are 
assigned to each class, so that in each hall one-fourth of 
the rooms are reserved for the entering class. All students 
have the privilege of retaining their rooms from year to 
year. The students who wish to change their rooms draw 
by classes for choice of rooms. All upper class students are 
assigned rooms for the following year before May. 10th. 

The following table shows the number of students in each 
hall, December, 1909 : 



Total Number of Students in Residence. 





Merion. 


Radnor. 


Denbigh. 


Pembroke 
East. 


Pembroke Rocke- 
West. feller. 




Undergraduates 
Graduates 


45 

.... 


40 

7 


49 
16 


58 
9 


54 
10 


64 
13 


310 
55 


Total 


45 


47 


65 


67 


64 77 


365 



The secretary's office is in charge of the distribution of 
all examination papers. Some of the college examination 
questions are typewritten and mimeographed in the secre- 

(41) 



42 



tary.'s office. Examination questions for the larger classes 
are printed, but all pass through the secretary's office. 

The students register deferred and conditioned examina- 
tions at Easter and Thanksgiving and pay their examination 
fees to the secretary. The receipts from these examinations 
in 1909-10 were $1,387. Applications and fees for the 
matriculation examinations are sent to the secretary's office. 
The receipts from matriculation fees and matriculation pam- 
phlets in 1909-10 were $2,660.22. 

The matriculation examinations were held in the spring 
of 1910 in twenty-six cities as well as at Bryn Mawr College. 
In each centre the examinations were proctored by an alumna 
of the college. 



Number of Candidates. 



Baltimore 46 

Boston 36 

Bryn Mawr 86 

Catonsville 14 

Chicago 17 

Columbus 4 

Eond du Lac 14 

Greenwich, Conn 54 

Eort Wayne 2 

Harrisburg 2 

Indianapolis .* . 1 

London, England 1 

Los Angeles 1 

Louisville 1 

Milwaukee 2 



Minneapolis 2 

New York 29 

Paris, Erance 1 

Pittsburgh . 5 

Princeton 3 

Providence 4 

Richmond 7 

-Rje 1 

St. Louis 2 

Washington, Conn 13 

Washington, D. C. . . . . 1 

Wilkesbarre 2 



Total 



,351 



Number. 

Candidates taking finals 146 

Candidates taking preliminaries 203 
Candidates taking conditions ... 2 



Passed. 


Per cent 


129 


88.369 


159 


78.35 


2 


100.00 



Total 351 



290 



Sixty candidates took the College Entrance Exainina 
tion Board examinations and applied for admission to Bryri 
Mawr College in June, 1910. 

Of the sixty-one schools that prepared candidates for the 
matriculation examinations in the spring of 1010, twenty- 
one were schools sending up candidates for the first time. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Anna Bell Lawther, 

Secretary. 



Report of the Appointment Secretary. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to submit the following report on the 
work of the Bureau of Appointments for the year 1909-10. 

The following positions have been secured through the 
Appointment Bureau for the year 1910-11. 

Teachers in private schools 10 

Teachers in public schools 3 

Secretaries 1 

Tutors and temporary, positions 11 

Total number of positions secured . . 25 

Salaries ranging from $400 (half position) to $1500. 
The above positions have been secured by members of the 
following classes : 

Class of 1910 5 

" " 1909 7 

" 1908 5 . 

" 1907 3 

" " 1905 2 

Former students 1 

Undergraduates still in college 2 

25 

Registrations for Positions for 1910-11. 

Graduate Students : Registrations 23 

Positions offered through Appointment 

Bureau 6 

Declined 6 

Seniors : Registrations 21 

Positions offered through Appointment 

Bureau 12 

Accepted 5 

44 



45 



Declined 5 

Left open 2 

Alumnae and Former Students : Registrations ... 55 
Positions offered through Appointment 

Bureau 39 

Accepted 17 

Declined 22 

Graduates, Alumnae and Undergraduates for Sum- 
mer work : Registrations 14 

Positions offered through Appointment 

Bureau 3 

Accepted 3 

Total number of registrations 113 

Total number of positions offered 60 

Total number of positions accepted 25 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ethel M. Walker, 
Appointment Secretary. 



Report of the Head Librarian. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to present the annual report of the work 
of the library for the year ending September 30, 1910. 

The following table shows the additions made from 
various sources, and the total present extent of the library, 
with a statement of the condition of a year ago for the pur- 
poses of comparison: 

Accessions. 
Number of volumes October 1, 1909 58,548 

Number of volumes added: 

1908-09 1909-10 

By purchase . . 1,940 1,920 

By binding . , 585 603 

By gift and exchange 641 455 

By replacement 19 2 

Unknown sources 32 9 

Christian Union 36 

Reaccessioned 7 

Total additions 3,260 2,989 

Volumes withdrawn 56 147 

Net gain 3,204 2,842 

Maps added 98 

Pamphlets added 214* 

Pamphlets withdrawn 19 

Net gain 195 

Total volumes September 30, 1910 61,390 

Total accessioned pamphlets 2,086 

Total maps 1,979 

* These numbers represent catalogued pamphlets only. There is also in the library 
a growing collection of several thousand pamphlets arranged alphabetically by author. 
Pamphlets when bound are withdrawn and again accessioned as books. 

46 



47 
These accessions are distributed by classes as follows : 

1908-09 1909-10 

General works 571 388 

Philosophy 173 125 

Eeligion 140 121 

Social Science 505 423 

Philology. 125 143 

Science 305 406 

Useful Arts 33 41 

Pine Arts 36 142 

Literature 1,023 815 

History, etc 349 385 

Total 3,260 2,989 

A list of donors to the library with titles of the books 
and pamphlets presented is appended. This list does not in- 
clude books purchased from the gifts of money mentioned 
later under the financial statement, nor are these included in 
the table of accessions under the head of Gifts and Exchanges, 
since the actual buying of the books took place through the 
library. 

Cataloguing. 

1908-09 1909-10 

Titles catalogued 2,677 2,126 

Cards written 9,305 8,136 

Seminary cards 343 414 

Continuations, etc., added . . 1,511 1,195 

The accessions for the year have been catalogued to date 
promptly. The recataloguing has progressed somewhat ir- 
regularly. It is our custom to recatalogue first such subjects 
as are being catalogued in the Library of Congress, thus mak- 
ing use of as large a number as possible of the printed cards. 
The following classes have been completed during the year: 
839, 540, 570 and 580. In addition several lone; sets and 



48 



continuations in other classes have been recatalogued as the 
printed cards were obtainable. 

During the long vacation the entire Sauppe collection 
was replated. This involved the transfer of the call number 
from the old book plate to the body, of the book, the removal 
where possible of the original plate and the pasting in of the 
new book plate and. the special plate of this collection. This 
involved much trimming and fitting to the various sizes of 
books. The expenditure of time and care in the work was 
far in excess of the original plating of an equal number of 
books. 

Binding. 

During the past year one of the firms that had done much 
of our binding went out of business. After several trials we 
succeeded in finding another bindery which is able to do our 
binding to our satisfaction. The following indicates the 
amount of binding done during the past year : 

Volumes sent 1908-09 and returned 1909-10. . 418 

Volumes sent and returned 1909-10 837 

In binders' hands September 30, 1910 44 



Total bound 1909-10 1,255 

Total sent 1909-10 891 

Total handled 1909-10 1,299 

Circulation. 

1908-09 1909-10 

October 3,688 3,872 

November 2,238 1,866 

December 1,873 1,343 

January 1,995 1,831 

February 2,232 2,305 

March 2,212 1,892 

April 1,862 2,278 

May 1,486 1,695 

Total 17,586 17,082 



49 



The rule governing the circulation of magazines was so 
modified by the Library Committee of the Board of Directors 
that members of the faculty are now permitted to take un- 
bound periodicals from the magazine room for periods not 
exceeding three days. 



Financial Statement. 

The sums available for the purchase of books, period- 
icals, binding and general supplies during the past year have 
been as follows : 

Annual appropriation apportioned as follows: 

Biology $150.00 

Chemistry 150.00 

English 150.00 

French 150.00 

Geology 110.00 

German 150.00 

Greek 150.00 

History 150.00 

Italian 75.00 

Latin 150.00 

Mathematics 150.00 

Philosophy 150.00 

Physics 150.00 

Political Science 150.00 

Reference books 50.00 

Religious books 25.00 

General literature 75.00 

Library expenses 790.00 

Art (special) 75.00 

Total $3,000.00 



50 



Deferred and Conditioned Examinations Fund: 
Apportioned as follows: 
Regular. 

Art $100.00 

Botany 50.00 

Education 50.00 

Psychology. 150.00 

Comparative Philology 30.00 

Special. 

Biology $200.00 

Semitics 25.00 

English (Prof. Brown) 300.00 

English (Dr. Hatcher) 150.00 

German Academies . . '.• 300.00 

Greek (Prof. Wright) 50.00 

History (Dr. Smith) 150.00 

Italian 100.00 

Total $1,655.00 

The income on special funds for the year is as follows: 

Dr. Rhoads Memorial Fund $67.70 

Class of 1902 (devoted to books on psy- 
chology) 29.46 

Sale of books and fines 260.00 

Hall libraries, students' subscriptions. 243.93 

Gifts of money have been as follows: 

From Miss Garrett, for books on the following subjects : 

Course in non-dramatic literature . . . $50.00 

Course in Victor Hugo 75.00 

English Literature 75.00 

Course in Italian Masterpieces 30.00 

Italian Art 50.00 

Art and Archaeology 145.01 



51 

English, General $20.00 

English, Hall library hooks 19.32 

Hygiene 8.03 

Books for President's Office 12.51 

$484.87 

Anonymous, for Spanish books 

(1905) $100.00 

Class of 1910, In memory of Fran- 
ces Appleton Jackson 83.25 

Undergraduate Association, In mem- 
ory of J. Edmund Wright 46.00 

Oriental Club 7.00 

From other sources, not gifts : 

Geology equipment fund $52.83 

Unexpended balances from 1908-09 : 

From Ottendorfer Fnnd 307.94 

Helen Lee Stevens Fund 2.51 

Rhoads Memorial Fund 1.54 

Unexpended and carried over to 1910-11 : 

Ottendorfer Fund $30.10 

Oriental Club 7.00 

The J. Edmund Wright Memorial Fund 44.85 

From the accounts kept by. the Librarian, the following 
summary of expenditures from all sources may be of interest : 

For binding $665.39 

" continuations 641.18 

" periodicals 1,659.81 

" books 3,040.86 

" express and postage 61.18 

" supplies 228.74 

$6,297.16 



52 

Inter-Library Loans. 

During the past year we have borrowed from other in- 
stitutions 77 volumes as follows: 

University of Chicago 2 

Columbia University 5 

Library of Congress 2 

Harvard University 11 

Library Company. 17 

Mercantile Library 3 

Northwestern University 1 

University of Pennsylvania 23 

Princeton University 11 

Protestant Episcopal Divinity School .... 1 

Yale University. 1 

Books have been lent to other institutions as follows : 

Haverford College 2 

University of Pennsylvania , 5 

Inventory. 

No inventory was taken of the library this year, but a 
careful search for the books missing one year ago results in 
the following: 

Prom the inventory of 1905 there are still missing 26 
volumes ; from the inventory of 1907, 18 volumes are still 
missing in the main library and 17 in the halls. At the close 
of the inventory of 1909, 78 volumes were reported missing. 
During the year four of the 30 volumes missing from the 
main library have been found and nine of the 26 missing from 
the halls, leaving 65 still not located. The total number of 
books missing from the library at the present date is then 109. 

The Building. 

The rearrangement of offices and rooms noted in my 
last report has been in effect during the past year, and has 



proved most satisfactory. The reference room has added 
materially to the library as its growing use continually indi- 
cates. The rearrangement of offices has likewise proved sat- 
isfactory. 

The electric clock, installed in the library during the 
year, the ornamental bronze dial in the reading room, the 
master clock in the stack, and an additional clock in the ref- 
erence room, have proved such a convenience that is is hoped 
the system may. be extended to the magazine rooms and semi- 
nary libraries. 

In this connection it may be not out of place to note the 
purchase of a small vacuum cleaner which has proved most 
satisfactory in the care of the building. 

General Administration. 

During the past year the staff has remained much the 
same as in former years. In December Miss Dunn resigned 
and Miss Blackburn was promoted to her post at the loan desk. 
September 1st Miss Blackburn resigned, and Mrs. Cassandra 
Warner is under appointment for the post for the coming 
year. Student assistants for the year have been: Miss Ladd, 
Miss Boggs, Miss Byrne, Miss Liddell and Miss Murray. 

The fellows have taken care as usual of the hall and 
department libraries. 

The librarian repeated the lectures on the use of the 
library to the students in the autumn. Especial effort has 
been made during the year to get into closer touch with the 
students. The new reference room has aided, but there 
still remains much to be desired. The students do not as yet 
make the fullest possible use of the library. The continued 
co-operation of faculty, library staff, and the students them- 
selves has made the success of the year from the Librarian's 
point of view, and I am very glad to acknowledge my in- 
debtedness to those whose continued assistance has proved of 
such value. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mart L. Jones, 

Librarian. 



Gifts to Bryn Maivr College Library, 1909-10. 

Gifts from Individuals. 

Dr. E. Stanley Abbott: Abbott, Syllogistic Philosophy. 

Miss Annie H. Abel : Abel, Indians in the Civil War. 

Mrs. Francis Greenleaf Allinson : Allinson, Greek Lands 
and Letters. 

Hon. Richard Bartholdt: Mission of America in the Pol- 
itics of the World. 

Miss Cora A. Benneson : Peabody Museum Papers, Vol. 
4, jSTo. 3 ; Science. 

Dr. Salvatore Lo Bianco: Bianco, J^otizie biologiche 
riguardanti specialinente il periodo di maturita sessuale degli 
animale del golfo di ISTapoli. 

Miss Grace Bagnall Branham : Dulci Fistula. 

Rev. James F. Brodie : Macmillan, Life of George 
Matheson ; Nicoll, Life of the Rev. John Watson. 

Hon. James Bryce: Memorandum on Some of the Re- 
sults of Indian Administration During the Past Fifty Years 
of British Rule in India ; Statement Exhibiting the Moral 
and Material Progress and Condition of India During the 
Year 1908-09. 

Mr. John Bunte : Bunte, Gyroscopic Theory of the Me- 
chanical Part of Nature. 

Dr. Paul Carus: Cams, Philosophy, as a Science. 

Mr. Herbert 1ST. Casson: Casson, Cyrus Hall McCor- 
mick, his Life and Work. 

Miss Florence Tinsley Cox: Cox, The Chronicles of 
Rhoda. 

Mr. Theodore M. Davis: Davis, The Tomb of Siphtha; 
Davis, The Tomb of Queen Tiyi. 

Mr. Joseph Debar: Debar, Prohibition, Its Relation to 
Good Government. 

Miss Constance Deming: Chisholm, Handbook of Com- 
mercial Geography. 

54 



55 

Hon. Chauncey M. Depew: Speech — April 26, 1909; 
Speech in the United States Senate, February 24, 1910. 

Professor Luther Pfahler Eisenhart: Eisenhart, Trea- 
tise on the Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces. 

Mr. Edward C. Farnsworth: Farnsworth, The Sophis- 
tries of Christian Science. 

Mr. II. C. Folger, Jr. : Standard Oil Company, of New 
Jersey against the United States of America, Brief for Appel- 
lants, Vols. 1 and 2 ; Brief on the Law on Part of Appellants, 
and Appendix. 

Hon. J. H. Gallinger: Gallinger, Story of a Tariff. 

Miss Mary E. Garrett: Abbott, Women in Industry; 
Gilman, The Home ; Schreiner, Story of an African Farm ; 
Suffrage Pamphlets. 

Mr. David Goodbread: Goodbread, Star of Bethlehem. 

Prof. William H. Goodyear: Goodyear, The Desirable 
Projection of Art Museums as Suggested by, the Desirable 
Classification of Art Libraries. 

Dr. George M. Gould: Gould, Fifty-seven Varieties of 
Medical and Ophthalmic Blunders; Gould, From the Patient's 
Point of View; Gould, Pole of Visual Function in Animal 
and Human Evolution ; Gould, An Appeal for the Sake of 
Man and of Medicine ; Bibliography of the Contributions of 
George M. Gould, M.D., to Ophthalmology, General Medi- 
cine, Literature. 

Mr. Angelo Hall : Hall, An Astronomer's Wife. 

Miss Mary Hallock : Hallock-Greenewalt, Time Eternal. 

Mr. Frederick Barnard Hawley: Hawley, Enterprise 
and the Productive Process. 

Rev. J. A. Homan: Homan, Prohibition, The Enemy 
of Temperance. 

Mr. Thomas M. Johnson: The Platonist, Vols. 1-4. 

Mr. F. Robertson Jones: Proceedings of the Sixth 
Annual Meeting of the Board of Casualty and Surety Under- 
writers, 1909. 

Mr. John W. Jordan : Report of the Valley Forge Park 
Commission, 1908. 

Mr. II. W. Kaiser: Triangular Debate Between Tulane 



56 



University, University of North Carolina and the University 
of Virginia. 

Dr. Ralph Wood Kenyon: Bruce, Apologetics; Ragg, 
Evidences of Christianity ; Khowling, Literary Criticism 
and the New Testament ; Maitland, Scepticism and Faith. 

Dr. Frances Lowater: Lowater, The Spectra of Sulphur 
Dioxide. 

Mr. David Lubin: Lubin, International Institute of 
Agriculture and Co-operative Banking. 

Mr. Richard LudlofF: LudlofF, Argentinische Dichtun- 
gen, Bd. 1 ; LudlofF, Die Schopf ung. 

Mrs. Anna Benneson McMahan: McMahan, The Study. 
Class. 

Miss Isabel Maddison: Suassure, Expose resume de la 
Geometrie des Feuillets ; Bricard, Sur la Geometrie des Feuil- 
lets. 

Prof. E. L. Mark: Contributions from the Zoological 
Laboratory of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Har- 
vard College, No. 205. 

Dr. S. Weir Mitchell : Mitchell, Pearl. 

Mr. R. Burnham Moffat: Moffat, Moffat Geneaologies. 

Prof. R. Barton Opitz : -Studies from the Department 
of Physiology of Columbia University, Reprints, 1887-97. 

Dr. Thomas Hidden Page: Page, ed., British Poets of 
the Nineteenth Century. 

Dr. Marion Parris : P arris, Total Utility and the Eco- 
nomic Judgment ; Vocations for the Trained Woman. 

Mr. Frederick Mailing Pedersen: Pedersen, Influence 
of Molecular Constitution upon the Internal Friction of 
Gases. 

Miss Rose Jeffries Peebles : Schonewulf , Die symbolische 
Darstellung der Auferstehung in der Fruhchristlichen Kunst. 

Miss Elizabeth B. Pope : Tipyn o' Bob, January, 1904, 
January and February, 1906, January and March, 1908. 

Dr. Carl C. Rice: Rice, Phonology of Gallic Clerical 
Latin after the Sixth Century. 

Miss Louise Elizabeth Roberts : Tipyn o' Bob, January 
and April, 1908. 



57 

Dr. Albert Schinz: Schinz, Jean- Jacques Rousseau, A 
Forerunner of Pragmatism. 

Miss Jane C. Shoemaker: Tipyn o' Bob, January, 1904. 

Mr. Edward Silyin: Silvin, Index to Periodical Litera- 
ture on Socialism. 

Miss Anna M. Starr: Starr, The Microsporophylls of 
Ginkgo. 

Mr. William Shipley Taylor: Genealogy of the Taylor 
Family. 

President M. Carey Thomas : Russell's Outline Study 
of Law ; Willougby, Supreme Court of the United States ; 
Whitney Memorial Meeting ; Cincinnati Conference for Good 
City Government, Proceedings, 1909 ; Romance of Emare 
(E. E. T. S. Extra Series, Vol. 99) ; TIailman, Education of 
the Indians ; Stewart, The Origin of the Werewolf Supersti- 
tion. 

Mrs. Herbert Tuttle: Collection of Letters. 

M. Hugues Vaganay: Vaganay, Les Odes de P. de Ron- 
sard Gentilhomme Vandomois. 

Hon. Irving P. Wanger: Tariff Hearings, Sixtieth Con- 
gress, Vols. 1-9 ; Official Register of the United States, 1909 ; 
Congressional Record, Vol. 44, Pts. 1-5 and Index ; Message 
of the President of the United States Communicated to the 
Two Houses of Congress at the Beginning of the Sixty-first 
Congress, Second Session ; Congressional Directory, Sixty- 
first Congress, Second Session, Ed. 1 ; Report of the National 
Conservation Committee, February, 1909 ; American Char- 
ters, Constitutions, and Organic Laws, Vols. 1-7 ; Reports on 
the White Slave Traffic ; Annual Report of the Commissioner 
General of Immigration 1904, 1907, 1909 ; Hearings before 
the Committee to Investigate the Interior Department and 
Forestry Service, Papers ; Report of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, 1890-1897; Twenty-third Annual Re- 
port of the Commissioner of Labor ; The Rat and Its Rela- 
tion to the Public Health ; Geological Survey Bulletin, Nos. 
397, 410, 418, 421 ; Statistical Abstract of the United States, 
1909. 

Dr. Joseph W. Warren : Jones, Malaria and Greek 
History. 



58 

Dr. Talcott Williams: National Association of Wool 
Manufacturers, Bulletin Nos. 13-18, Pts. 1-3, 19 3 " 1 , 20-22 1 - 2 - 4 , 
23, 24 1 " 2 , 25-31 1 , 34 1 ' 3 ' 1 , 35 1 , 36 1 ; Bulletin of the Bureau of 
. Labor, No. 80. 

-Mrs. W. Hunter Workman: Workman, Ice-bound 
Heights of the Mustagh; Workman, Peaks and Glaciers of 
Nun Kun ; Workman, Through Town and Jungle. 

Gifts and Exchanges from Institutions, Societies, 
Etc., 1909-10. 

Academy, of Natural Sciences : Journal, Ser. 2, Vol. 14, 
Pt. 1 ; Proceedings, Vol. 61, Pt. 2. 

Acheson Oildag Company: A Pathfinder, Discovery, 
Invention, Industry. 

American Antiquarian Society: Handbook of Informa- 
tion. 

American Jewish Historical Society: Publications, 
No. 19. 

American Marathi Mission: Report, 1909. 

Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the 
Southern States : Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Meet- 
ing, 1909. 

Association of Collegiate Alumna?: Publications, Ser. 3, 
Nos. 19-22. 

Australia, Commonwealth Statistician : Official Year- 
book, 1901-09, No. 3. 

Bodleian Library: Staff-kalendar, 1910; Soltau, The 
Duke de Choiseul ; Dark, An Permittendum sit mulieribus 
jus Suffragi ? ; Huxley, Holyrood; Lyon, El Conde de Gon- 
domar ; Annual Report of the Curators, 1909 ; McKenzie, 
Virgil, Aeneid II ; Knox, Remigium alarum ; Bewley, Atlan- 
tis ; Hunter, Rus Vacuum. 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts : Annual Report, 1909. 

Boston University: Geddes, Study of An Acadian — 
French Dialect. 

Bronx Society of Arts and Sciences: Transactions, Vol. 
1, Pt. 2. 



59 



Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences : Yearbook, 
1908-09; Science Bulletin, Vol. 1, No. 17. 

Brown University: Contributions from the Biological 
Laboratory, Vol. 6. 

Bryn Mawr College: Monograph Series, Vol. 8. 

Bryn Mawr College: May Day Committee, Programmes. 

Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church: Manual and Direc- 
tory of the Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church, 1908. 

California Bureau of Labor Statistics: Special Labor 
Report. 

L T niversity of California: Publications — Physiology, 
Vol. 3, Nos. 16-17 ; Zoology, Vol. 5, Nos. 5-12, Vol. 6, No's. 
4-11, Vol. 7, No. 1. 

California Academy of Sciences : Proceedings, Ser. 4, 
Vol. 3, Pp. 49-56. 

California Weekly: Report on the Causes of Municipal 
Corruption in San Francisco. 

Canada Department of Agriculture : Publications of the 
Canadian Archives, Nos. 3-4 ; Inventory of the Military 
Documents in the Canadian Archives. 

Canada Geological Survey : 2 Publications. 

Canada, Department of Mines : 23 Publications, 5 Maps. 

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: 
Annual Report, 1909; Bulletin Nos. 3-4; Pritchett, The 
Spirit of the State Universities. 

Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh: Founder's Day — 1910. 

Carnegie Institution of Washington: 23 Publications ; 
Yearbook, No. 2, 8. 

Central Conference of American Rabbis: Yearbook, 
]909. 

Century Company: Hymns of Worship and Service. 

Chicago Association of Commerce : Plumbe, Chicago, Its 
Natural Advantages as an Industrial and Commercial Center 
and Market. 

Municipal Court of Chicago: Annual Report, 1908-09. 

Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy: Training 
for Social Work, 1910-11. 

Children's Aid Society of Pennsylvania: Twenty- 
eighth Annual Report. 



60 

University of Colorado: Studies, Vol. 5, No. 1, Vol. 7, 
Nos. 1-4. 

Columbia University: Material by and about Edgar 
Allan Poe to be Found in the Library of Columbia Univer- 
sity; University Bibliography, 1909. 

Committee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis: 5 Pam- 
phlets, 6 Circulars. 

Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences: Transac- 
tions, March and April, 1910. 

Connecticut State Geological and Natural History Sur- 
vey ; Bulletin No. 14. 

Connecticut Bureau of Labor Statistics: Connecticut 
Labor Bulletin No. 3. 

Consumers' League of the City of New York: Report, 
1909. 

Cornell University: 20 Dissertations. 

Republics de Cuba. The Republic of Cuba in 1909. 

Dante Society: Annual Report, 1908. 

Dartmouth College Library: Proceedings of the Web- 
ster Centennial of Dartmouth College. 

Universite de Geneve: 18 Publications. 

Georgia Geological Survey: Mineral Resources of 
Georgia. 

Greenwich House : Annual Report, 1909. 

University of Groningen: 12 Dissertations; Jaarboek, 
1908-09 ; Academie gebouw Groningen, 1614-1909. 

Guilford Battle Ground Company: Smith, Clio; Wad- 
dell, General Francis Nash ; Battle of Guilford Court House. 

Harvard University Jefferson Physical Laboratory: 
Contributions, Vol. 1. 

Henry Holt and Company: Jones, Logic. 

Hull House: Yearbook, 1910. 

Illinois State Geological Survey: Bulletin, Nos. 11-14. 

Hlinois State Historical Library: Transactions, 1908. 

Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics : Annual Coal Report, 
1908-09 ; Biennial Report, 1908. 

Illinois State Laboratory of Natural History: Bulletin 
7, Article No. 10 ; Bulletin 8, Articles 1-2, 4-5. 



! 61 

Indiana State Board of Health: Social Hygiene vs. 
the Sexual Plagues. 

Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States: 
Fourth Annual Convention. 

International School of Peace: Brewer, Mission of the 
United States in the Cause of Peace ; Mead, The Literature 
of the Peace Movement; An International School of Peace; 
The International Library. 

Iowa Geological Survey: Annual Eeport, 1907, 1908. 

John Crerar Library : Cataloguing Rules ; List of Books 
in the Reading Room, 1909 ; List of Current Medical Period- 
icals; Fifteenth Annual Report, 1909. 

John F. Slater Fund: Proceedings, 1908-09. 

Johns Hopkins University: 25 Dissertations. 

The Joseph Fels Fund of America : The Taxation ^ 
Land Values. 

University of Kansas : Science Bulletin, Vol. 11, No. 'i . 

Kentucky Arbor and Bird Day Bulletin, 1910. 

Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian : Pro- 
ceedings of the Twenty-seventh Annual Meeting. 

Messrs. Lemcke & Buechner : Catalogue Raisonne, I. 
German Literature, Supplement. 

Liverpool Biological Society: Proceedings and Transac- 
tions, Vol. 23. 

London and JSTorthwestern Railway: 14 Pamphlets. 

Lord Ii I^aosuke Memorial Committee: Lord Ii !N"ao- 
suke and ISTew Japan. 

University of Manchester : Publications ; Economic 
Series, ISTos. 1-12. 

Marine Biological Laboratory: Report, 1909. 

Maryland Geological Survey: Report 1908, 1909; Re- 
port of the Conservation Commission of Maryland, 1908-09. 

Maryland Bureau of Statistics: Annual Report, 1909. 

Maryland Weather Service : Maryland Weather Service, 
Vol. 3. 

Massachusetts State Board of Charity: Annual Report, 
1909. 

Massachusetts Bureau of Statistics : Municipal Bulletin, 
No. 1. 



62 

Massachusetts Bureau of Statistics of Labor : Thirty- 
ninth Annual Report. 

Merchants' Association of New York: Against Con- 
struction of More Reservoirs in the Croton Valley. 

Merck & Co. : E. Merck's Annual Report, Vol. 22. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art: Annual Report, 1909. 

Michigan Board of Health: Annual Report, 1908. 

Michigan Department of Labor: First Annual Report. 

University of Michigan: Early, Detroit; Eleventh Re- 
port of the Michigan Academy of Science; University Bul- 
letin, New Series, Vol. 10, Nos. 21-22; Sanders, Roman 
History and Mythology ; Sanders, The Old Testament Manu- 
scripts in the Freer Collection. 

Missouri Bureau of Geology, and Mines: Publications, 
Series 2, Vols. 1-9, Pts. 1-2 ; Geological Survey, Report, 
Vol. 13. 

Missouri Botanical Garden: Annual Report, 1909. 

University of Missouri : Exercises at the Inauguration 
of Albert Ross Hill, LL.D., as President of the University; 
Studies, Literary and Linguistic Series, Vol. 1. 

National Association of Surviving Union Volunteer 
Officers of the Civil War ; Two Documents relating to the 
Civil War and its Surviving Officers. 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers: 18 Bul- 
letins. 

National Civic Federation: Report of the Public Own- 
ership and Operation Committee, Vol. 1, Pts. 1 and 2, Vol. 
2, Ft, 2. 

National League for the Civic Education of Women: 
W T oman, An Address Delivered by Rev. Charles H. Park- 
hurst, D.D., December 17, 1909. 

National Municipal League : English, The Function of 
Business Bodies in Improving Civic Conditions. 

National Women's Trade Union League: Convention, 
1909 ; Second Biennial Convention, 1909. 

New England Society of the City of New York: 104th 
Anniversary Celebration, 1909. 

New Jersey, Bureau of Labor Statistics : Annual Report, 
1909. 



63 

New York (City) Board of Education: Annual Report, 
1907, 1908 ; Annual Financial and Statistical Report, 1906, 
1907, 1908 ; Directory of Teachers in Public Schools, 1909. 

New York (City) Peace Society: Carnegie, Armaments 
and Their Results. 

New York (City) Tenement House Department: Fourth 
Report, 1907-08. 

New York (State) Education Department: Annual Re- 
port, 1908, and Supplement, 1909 ; Academic Examination 
Papers for 1908-09; The American Flag; Bulletin, Nos. 457- 
461, 469, 472, 474. 

New York (State) Historian: Minutes of the Commis- 
sioners for Detecting and Defeating Conspiracies in the State 
of New York, Vols. 1-3. 

New York (State) Hospital for the Care of Crippled 
and Deformed Children: Annual Report, No. 9. 

New York (State) Department of Labor: Bureau of 
Factory, Inspection, Annual Report, Vol. 8 ; Bureau of Labor 
Statistics, Annual Report, 1908; Bureau of Mediation and 
Arbitration, Annual Report, 1908. 

New York (State) Museum: Report, Vol. 62, Pts. 1-4. 

New York Tax Reform Association : Pleydell, Municipal 
Taxation. 

New York Training School for Deaconesses: Yearbook, 
1909-10. 

Newark (N. J.) Shade Tree Commission: Fifth Annual 
Report, 1908. 

Newport (R. L), City Clerk: Newport, City Documents, 
1908. 

University of North Carolina: Elisha Mitchell Scien- 
tific Society, Journal, Vol. 25, Nos. 3-4, Vol. 26, No. 1; 
Studies in Philology, Vols. 5, 10. 

State University, of Oklahoma: Research Bulletin, Nos. 
1-2. 

Oriental Society: Annual Report, 1909. 

Paris, Ministere de l'Instruction Publique ; Catalogue 
des Theses, fasc. 25, and Annees scolaires, 1904-09. 

Paris, Universite de Paris. Bibliotheque : Le Livret de 
l'Etudiant de Paris, Programmes Sommaires, 1909-10. 



64 

Pennsylvania State Library: Adjutant General, Report, 
1907; Department of Agriculture, Report, 1908; Attorney 
General, Annual Report, 1907-08; Banking Commission, 
Report, 1908, Pt. 2 ; Department of Fisheries, Report, 1908 ; 
Insurance Commissioner, Annual Report, 1908, Pts. 1-2 ; 
Department of Internal Affairs, Report, 1908, Pt. 3 ; De- 
jDartment of Mines, Report, 1908, Pt. 2 ; Board of Commis- 
sioners of Public Charities, Annual Report, 1907 ; Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction, Report, 1909 ; Regimental 
Histories, History of 153rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, His- 
tory, of Plampton Battery, History of the 18th Pennsylvania 
Cavalry; State College, Carnegie Library of the Pennsyl- 
vania State College, Information on the Arrangement and 
Use of the Library; State Treasurer, Report, 1909; Smull's 
Handbook, 1909 ; Statutes at Large, Vol. 13 ; Archives, Ser. 
2, Vols. 13-19 ; 27 Miscellaneous Bulletins. 

Pennsylvania Prison Society: Journal of Prison Disci- 
pline and Philanthropy, January, 1910. 

University of Pennsylvania : Lincoln, Revolutionary 
Movement in Pennsylvania ; Contributions from the Zoolog- 
ical Laboratory, Vol. 15 ; Publications, Series in Philology 
and Literature, Vol. 13. 

Perkins Institution for the Blind: Sixtieth Annual 
Report. 

Philadelphia City Institute : Fifty-eighth Annual Re- 
port. 

Princeton University Library: Harrod, Latin Terms of 
Endearment and of Family Relationship ; Conwell, The 3 — 
Space P. G. (3, 2) and its Group; Hudson, The Forms of 
Milk Sugar. 

Radcliffe College: Monographs, E"o. 15. 

Royal Society of Canada : Proceedings and Transactions, 
Ser. 3, Vols. 1, 2 1 " 2 , 3. 

Sagamore Sociological Conference : Third Sagamore 
Sociological Conference, 1909. 

Scandinavian-American Line: Traveler's Guide to the 
Scandinavian Countries and Iceland. 

Seybert Institution for Poor Boys and Girls: Report, 



65 

1908 ; Murphy, Care of Exceptional Children by the Chil- 
dren's Bureau of Philadelphia. 

Short Ballot Organization: The Short Ballot; A Real 
Democracy; Politics Without Politicians. 

Smithsonian Institution: Annual Report, 1908; Miscel- 
laneous Collections, Vol. 52, No. 1872, Vol. 54, Nos. 1870, 
1922-27, Vol. 55, No. 1920 Vol. 56, Nos. 1929-31, 1933, 
1935-37, 1941-42, 1945, Vol. 51, No. 1869, Vol. 53, Nos. 
1934, 1939, Vol. 57, No. 1940. 

Societe Beige d'Astronomie : Arctowski, L'Enehainement 
des variations Climatiques. 

Society of Colonial Wars, Ohio: Yearbook, 1909. 

Strassburg Universitaet : 41 Dissertations. 

University of Texas: Bulletin, Nos. 119, 125, 129, 134- 
138, 146. 

University of Toronto: Studies, Biological Series, Nos. 
4-7 ; Chemical Series, Nos. 74-85 ; History and Economic 
Series, Vol. 2, Nos. 2-4, Vol. 3, No. 1 ; Physical Series, Nos. 
22-31; Physiological Series, Nos. 4-7; Psychological Series, 
Vol. 2, Nos. 1-4, Vol. 3, No. 1. 

Transylvania University: Shearin, The "That" Clause 
in the Authorized Version of the Bible. 

Tufts College : Studies, Science Series, Vol. 3, No. 1. 

Union League of Philadelphia: Annual Report, 1909. 

United States Brewers' Association: Text-book of True 
Temperance ; American Beer ; Starke, Alcohol, The Sanction 
for its Use; Yearbook, 1910. 

University Club of New York: Annual, 1910-11. 

Wellcome Chemical Research Laboratories : Papers, 93- 
107. 

The White House : Conference of the Governors of the 
United States, May 13-15, 1908. 

Wilmington Institute: Fifty-third Annual Report, 
1909-10. 

Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters: 
Transactions, Vols. 3-16, Pt. 1, No. 6. 

Wisconsin Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics: 
Biennial Report, Vol. 13. 



66 

Wisconsin Library Commission: Comparative Legisla- 
tion Bulletin, No. 21. 

Yale University, Library: 35 Reprints. 

Periodicals, The Gift of Publishers. 

Advocate of Peace ; Association for International Con- 
ciliation, Bulletin and Publications ; Book News Monthly ; 
Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Bulletin ; Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Quarterly; California University Chronicle; Columbia Uni- 
versity Quarterly; Deaconess Advocate; Friends' Missionary 
Advocate; Hartford Seminary, Record; Illinois State His- 
torical Society, Journal; Illinois University Studies; Inter- 
national Bureau of American Republics, Monthly Bulletin; 
Johns Hopkins University Circulars ; Massachusetts Bureau 
of Labor Statistics, Labor Bulletin; Metropolitan Museum 
of Art, Bulletin ; University of Nebraska Studies ; New 
York Public Library, Bulletin ; New York State Labor Bul- 
letin; Pennsylvania Library, Notes; Southern Workman; 
Spirit of Missions ; Technology Review ; Tipyn o' Bob ; Wash- 
ington Chapel Chronicle; Woman's Missionary Friend. 



Report of the Director of Athletics and .Gymnastics. 

To the President, Madam: 

I have the honor to make the following report on the 
work of gymnastics and athletics and of such work of the 
Health Department as has fallen within my province during 
the year 1909-10. 

Health and- Physical Examinations. 

Three hundred and twenty-seven students were examined 
in October, 1909, of these twelve were excused the full 
strength tests ; three hundred and nineteen students were re- 
examined in April, 1910, of these fourteen were excused 
the full strength tests. 

College averages from these examinations : 

Weight Height Expansion Strength Lung 

kg. cm. cm. kg. Capacity. 

Chest 9th Rib cu. in. 

October 57.22 162.27 5.82 5.86 264.06 182.76 

April. 57.11 162.79 5.63 6.02 311.79 185.38 

Class Averages. 
Class of 1910: 

October. 58.0 162.25 6.76 5.91 272.01 182.94 

April 57.02 163.92 5.76 6.09 316.68 184.49 

Class of 1911: 

October 57.29 162.85 5.61 6.10 275.89 185.39 

April... 56.93 162.92 5.56 5.99 318.23 187.00 

Class of 1912 : 

October 56.08 160.88 5.39 5.59 260.41 177.05 

April 56.47 162.20 5.67 5.75 309.85 181.00 

Class of 1913 : 

October 57.42 163.10 5.55 5.70 247.93 185.69 

April 58.15 163.49 5.78 6.24 302.40 189.04 

67 



68 



Table showing strength tests at first and second physical 
examinations, according to classes. 

Number of Students. 







October 


1909 






April, 


1910 




Class 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


Above 400 kg. 





2 








7 


4 


6 


3 


375 " 





1 





1 


3 


4 


5 


1 


350 " 


2 


1 


5 





6 


9 


5 


8 


325 " 


G 


3 


4 





10 


7 


10 


18 


300 " 


12 


11 


6 


7 


15 


11 


12 


24 


Average 275 " 


10 


12 


13 


12 


12 


15 


15 


21 


250 " 


15 


14 


18 


27 


8 


6 


20 


15 


225 " 


11 


10 


23 


29 


3 


4 


4 


7 


200 " 


8 


7 


10 


12 


1 


1 


2 


3 


175 " 


2 


2 


4 


10 














150 " 


1 





2 


2 















Table showing lung capacity at first and second physical 
examinations, according to classes : 



Number of Students. 



October, 1909 



April, 1910 





Class 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


Above 


220 CU. 


in. 3 


5 


5 


8 


6 


4 


6 


12 




210 " 


" 9 


4 


3 


7 


4 


7 


O 

O 


8 




200 " 


" 3 


10 


7 


10 


8 


9 


6 


10 




190 " 


" 13 


9 


10 


14 


9 


7 


9 


14 


Average 


180 " 


" 11 


6 


15 


19 


11 


10 


17 


19 




170 " 


" 6 


9 


16 


18 


7 


6 


11 


17 




160 " 


" 10 


14 


10 


14 


9 


10 


12 


8 




150 " 


" 7 




5 


4 


5 





9 


9 




140 " 


" 4 


2 


6 


2 


6 


2 


4 


3 




130 " 


" 


1 


4 


4 








1 







120 " 


" 





2 











1 







110 " 


" 1 





2 


















The three highest and lowest tests in strength and lung 
capacity were: 

Strength Tests. 



October, 1909 
Highest Lowest 

kg. Class kg. Class 

430.5 1911 170.5 1912 

385. 1910 162.5 1913 

379. 1913 160.5 1910 



April, 1910 
Highest Lowest 

kg. Class kg. Class 

483. 1912 220. 1913 

468. 1911 216.5 1911 

449.5 1910 203. 1910 



69 



Lung Capacity. 



Highest 
cu. in. 



Lowest 

Class cu. in. Class 

281 1911 121 1912 

266 1910 112 1910 

260 1913 110 1912 



Highest 
cu. in. 


Class 


Lowest 
cu. in. 


Class 


282 


1911 


140 


1912 


267 


1910 


134 


1912 



258 



1915 



120 



1912 



Defective physical conditions noted during October ex- 
aminations and treated during year by special exercises; in 
addition to the required gymnastics : 

Condition Number of Cases 

Scoliosis , 84 

General muscular weakness 3 

Weak chest < . 5 

Constipation 4 

High hip 1 

Flat or pronated feet < 20 

Varicose veins 1 

Cases treated by special exercises and massage under 
medical advice by Miss Branson: 

Condition Number of Cases 

Scoliosis 3 

Injured knee and general weakness 1 

Injured back and general weakness 1 

General weakness 5 



Cases not treated. 

Condition Number of Cases 

Lordosis 2 

Scoliosis • 1 

Defective physical and health conditions noted during 
October examinations and under supervision or referred to 
physicians during the year: 

Condition Number of Cases 

General debility . 25 

Nervousness ...,.., 10 



70 



Condition Number of Cases 

Recovering from illness or operations 8 

Catarrh 3 

Enlarged thyroid 2 

.Sleeplessness i 3 

Varicose veins 1 

Defective physical or health conditions noted during the 
College year and referred to physicians or put under 
supervision : 

Condition Number of Cases 

General debility 5 

Nervousness 1 

Recovering from illness or accident 4 

Eye strain 5 

Catarrh 1 

Overwork . . .i 2 

Caries 1 

Weak arches 4 

Anaemia 1 

Medical Examinations. 

Three hundred and twenty-five students were examined 
by the Visiting Physician of the College as to the condition 
of the heart and lungs, with the following results : 

Normal 265 No restrictions in athletics 

or gymnastics. 



Gymnastics and athletic 
work regulated to suit 



Cardiac murmurs... 15 
Slight cardiac irreg- 
ularity 33 

General health only "T-^ " 

c . J . , condition 

lair 11 

Bronchial trouble 1 j 

Oculist's Examinations. 

One hundred and eighty-two students were examined by 
the Examining Oculist of the College, with the following 
results : 



71 



Condition Number of Cases Treatment 

Normal 61 

Glasses satisfactory. .29 

Glasses satisfactory 
but to be under 
observation 6 

Treatment if symp- 
toms increased. . . .32 8 re-examined and glasses 

prescribed or changed. 

Needed immediate at- 37 re-examined and glasses 
tention 54 prescribed. 

Hygiene Lectures. 

Four lectures on practical hygiene were given in 
November : 

I. Introductory, Blood Conditions, Bathing, by C. M. 
K. Applebee. 
II. Digestion, Circulation, Ventilation, by C. M. K. 
Applebee. 

III. Exercise, Rest, Nerves, by C. M. K. Applebee. 

IV. Menstruation, by Anne Heath Thomas, M.D. 

These lectures were open to all students, attendance 
was compulsory for freshmen, resident and non-resident. 

Seven freshmen cut one lecture, one freshman cut two 
lectures. Penalty for cutting: A 'written 16 page paper on 
Hygiene. 

In connection with the Health Department a tuberculosis 
exhibit was held in the gymnasium in November, with a 
daily demonstration and one lecture by Dr. William Morris, 
of Philadelphia. 

Gymnasium Report. 

Trial drills for freshmen and drills for students not 
taking part in any athletics were held during November. 
The regular gymnastic season began November 29th and 
ended March 23rd. 



72 
Weekly classes were held as follows: 

Number of Number of 
Type Classes Students 

Light gymnastics 6 260 

Apparatus work 5 210 

Special medical aj>paratus work 3 15 

Fencing 4 63 

Classic dancing 1 121 

For graduate students 1 20* 

Students substituting special exercises or massage, or en- 
tirely excused : 

Cause Number of Cases 

Injured knee 3 

Caries 1 

Recovering from illness or operations 4 

The swimming pool was opened in December. Swim- 
ming lessons were given to one senior, twenty-five sopho- 
mores, thirty-five freshmen and four graduates. 



A contest between the sophomores and freshmen and an 
b 
23rd. 



exhibition of fencing and classic dancing was held on March 



The shield was awarded to the Freshman class. 

Events Points, 1912 Points, 1913 

Marching tactics 23 17 

Indian club drill 14 23 

Bar bell drill 15 24 

Rope climbing •.. 26 20 

Parallel bars 26 25 

Vaulting horse 24 23 



Total 128 132 

The judges were : Miss Adela Adams, Miss Stone, Mr. P. 
Bishop. 

♦Average attendance. 



73 

Three hundred and thirty-three students registered ex- 
ercise. Two hundred and sixteen students had no excuses 
from exercise, one hundred and seventeen had occasional ex- 
cuses. 

Causes of excuses from Number of students 

exercise excused 

Anaemia 1 

Asthma 1 

Blow on foot 2 

Breaking arch 1 

Broken ankle 1 

Bruised hip 2 

Broken nose 1 

Bruised foot 5 

Chicken-pox 1 

Colds 9 

Concussion of brain 1 

Conjunctivitis 2 

Finger infection 1 

Grippe 7 

Illness in family 12 

Intestinal disturbance 3 

Jaundice 3 

Laryngitis 1 

Measles 3 

Menorrhagia 7 

■ Mumps 1 

[Nervous exhaustion 17 

Neuralgia 1 

Neuritis 3 

Operations 4 

Pleurisy 1 

Recovering from typhoid 2 

Recovering from operations 4 

Sore throat 1 

Sprained ankle 7 

Injured knee 9 

Strained back 1 



74 



Causes of excuses from Number of students 

exercise excused 

Tonsilitis 4 

Toothache 1 

Vaccine infection 2 

Varicose veins 1 

Wart on foot 3 

Table of Accidents, 1909-10. 

Causes 

5 injured knees 5 Hockey. 

2 Basket-ball. 
1 Gymnastics. 

11 injured ankles 4 Hockey. 

3 Basket-ball. 

1 Gymnastics. 

2 Walking. 
1 Track. 

1 broken ankle 1 Fire drill. 

6 injured noses 4 Basket-ball. 

1 Walking. 
1 Skating. 



',-• 



3 cuts — 2 on face 1 Hockey, 1 Coasting. 

1 on knee 1 Fire drill. 

1 Concussion of brain 1 Track athletics. 

2 Blood tumors on leg 1 Hockey. 

1 Running. 

Fines. 

Two students failed to have their medical examination 
within the required time, three students failed to have their 



75 

oculist's examination within the required time, three failed 
to have their physical examinations within the required time. 
Mne students failed to register the required number of 
drills. Eight students failed to register the required number 
of periods of exercise. The fines were as follows: 

Medical examinations $4.00 

Oculist's examinations 6.00 

Physical examinations 6.00 

Gymnasium drills 46.00 

Exercise 35.50 

Total $97.50 

Athletics. 

Calendar of Athletics eoe the Year 1909-1910. 

September 30th — Hockey practice began. 

October 5th — First Athletic Association meeting held. 

October 13th — Interclass tennis tournament began. 

November 8th — Class hockey matches began. 

December 15th — Opening of swimming pool by Presi- 
dent Thomas. 

January 7th — Swimming meet, preliminaries. 

January 15th — Swimming meet, finals. 

February 3rd — Track practice began. 

February 7th — Water polo practice began. 

February 25th — Track meet, preliminaries. 

March 4th — Track meet, finals. 

March 31st — Basket-ball practice began. 

April 4th — Water polo matches began. 

May 9th — Interclass tennis doubles began. 

May 9th — Interclass basket-ball matches began. 

May 30th — Alumnre vs. Bryn Mawr 'Varsity tennis 
matches began. 

June 1st — Alumnae vs. Bryn Mawr 'Varsity basket-ball 
match held. 



76 

Athletic Statistics. 
Percentage of resident students taking part in athletics : 



Class 1910 


Basket- 
ball 
Per cent 

. 43 


Hockey 
Per cent 

57 


Authorised 
Swimmers 
Per cent 

48 


Water 

Polo 

Per cent 

17 


Tennis 
Per cent 

83 


Track 
Per cent 

19 


1911 


. 44 


63 


56 


19 


86 


27 


1912 


. 49 


65 


56 


16 


79 


25 


1913 


. 48 


75 


62 


18 


87 


21 


College . . . 


. 46 


65 


55.5 


17.5 


84 


23 



Percentage of resident students taking no part in 
athletics : 

Per cent 

Class 1910 3.4 

1911 1.6 

1912 2.5 

1913 1.5 

College ' 2.25 

Tennis. — The Class Championship was won by. 1913. 
The College Championship was won by 1913 also. The cap- 
tains were: E. Swift, 1910; II. Emerson, 1911; E. Earies, 
1912 ; A. Patterson, 1913. 

Hockey. — The Class Championship was won by 1910. 
The captains were: M. Kirk, 1910; L. Houghteling, 1911 ; 
C. Chase, 1912; A. Hearne, 1913. Each class had one first 
and one second team, with substitutes. Erom ninety-five to 
one hundred students practiced daily during the season. 

Swimming. — The Class Championship was w x on by 1910. 
The captains were: I. Taber, 1910; D. Coffin, 1911; E. 
Pinney, 1912 ; Y. Stoddard, 1913. The events at the contest 
were as follows: 

68-foot swim on front, 17 4-5 seconds. 
68-foot swim on back, 21 seconds. 



77 

Plunge for distance, 45 feet, 11 inches. 
Swim under water, 65 feet, 6 inches. 
136-foot swim on front, 43 seconds. 
136-foot swim on back, 48 1-5 seconds. 
Class relay, race. 
Dive for form. 
Fancy dive. 

Two records were broken : 

136-foot swim on front. 
68-foot swim on front. 

College records made: 

136-foot swim on back. 
68-foot swim on back. 

One hundred and eighty-two students were authorised as 
expert swimmers ;. sixty-five students took swimming lessons ; 
thirty-three students entered the contest. 

Water Polo.— The Class Championship was won by 
1913. Each class had one first team with substitutes. 

Track Athletics. — The Class Championship was won by 
1911. The Individual Championship was won by. H. 
Emerson, 1911. The events were : 

Hurdle race. 

Rope climb, 13 seconds. 

Running vault, 4 feet, 9 inches. 

Running high jump, 4 feet, 3% inches. 

Three broad jumps, 22 feet, 3% inches. 

Standing high jump, 3 feet, 5 inches. 

Shot put, 27 feet, S 1 /^ inches. 

Standing broad jump, 7 feet, 3~y 2 inches. 

Tug of war. # 

Standing hop, step, jump, 21 feet, 71/2 inches. 

Class relay race. 



78 



College records broken: 

Three broad jumps, 22 feet, 3% inches. 
Standing hop, step, jump, 21 feet, 7% inches. 

College record equaled : 

Standing high jump, 3 feet, 6 inches. 

The class captains were: C. Simonds, 1910; A. Parker, 
1911; F. Crenshaw, 1912; L. Haydock, 1913. Thirty-seven 
students entered the meet. 

Basket-ball. — The Class Championship was won by 
1910. The captains were: F. Heame, 1910; J. Allen, 1911; 
A. Chambers, 1912; A. G. Hamilton, 1913. Each class had 
one first and one second team, with substitutes. First and 
second interclass matches were played. From seventy to 
eighty students played daily during the season. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Constance M. K. Applebee, 
Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 



Report of the Attending Physician of the College. 
To the President : Madam. 

I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
cases I have attended at Bryn Mawr College from October 
1st, 1909, to June 1st, 1910: 

I. Medical. 

Influenza 1 

General cold with high temperature .... 5 

Tonsillitis 8 

Follicular tonsillitis 1 

Bronchitis 3 

Catarrhal bronchitis 2 

Laryngitis 3 

Pharyngitis 2 

Pleurisy 1 

Old plastic pleurisy 1 

Pheumatism 2 

Jaundice 1 

Ivy poisoning 2 

Gastritis 2 

Pityriasis rosea 1 

Urticaria 1 

Menorrhagia 3 

Neurasthenia 4 

Neurasthenia with melancholia 1 

Neuritis . 1 

Conjunctivitis 1 

Goitre with tachycardia 1 

German measles 2 

Mumps 1 

II. Surgical. 

Fracture of ankle . 1 

Sprain of ankle 7 

79 



80 



Fracture of nose 9 

Displaced nasal septum 1 

Abscess of ear 2 

Concussion from fall l 

Contusion of eighth rib 1 

Infected finger 1 

Laceration of ligaments of elbow 1 

Lacerated eye-brow 1 

Suppuration of cutis vera 1 

Adenitis from wisdom tooth 1 

Infection following vaccination 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Branson, 
Attending Physician of Bryn Mawr College. 



Report of the Visiting Pliysician of the College. 
To the President : Madam, 

As a summary of my work in the College for the year 
1909-10, I have the honor to submit the following report: 

I. Infirmary : 

Conditions treated. — 

Acute constipation 1 

Bronchitis 1 

Catarrhal jaundice 1 

Fracture of the clavicle 1 

Gastralgia 1 

Hamiatonia 1 

Indigestion, acute intestinal 1 

Influenza 4 

Laryngitis 2 

Nervous exhaustion 2 

Tonsillitis 4 

Varicella 1 

Total 20 

Number of visits, 45. 

II. Office and Halls of Residence: 

. Physical examinations 348 

Vaccinations 87 

Office consultations 1,321 

Visits to students confined to their rooms 45 

Total 1,801 

III. Classification of Consultations: 

(Physical examinations and vaccinations excluded) 

Graduates and hearers 36 

Seniors 49 

Juniors 40 

81 



82 



Sophomores 54 

Freshmen 82 

Others connected with the College 12 

Maids 36 

Total 309 

IV. Condition's treated: 

Surgical — cases of moderate injury — 

Abrasions IS 

Contusions 52 

Lacerated and incised wounds 8 

Sprains 53 

Burns 1 

Callus 8 

Dislocation of thumb 1 

Foreign bodies removed 4 

Fracture of clavicle 1 

Furuncles 6 

Hsematoma 4 

Hordeolum 2 

Impacted cerumen 4 

Infection of finger 5 

Metatarsalgia 1 

Paronychia 1 

Relaxation of plantar arch 3 

Verruca 2 

Total 172 

Medical — 

Acne vulgaris 6 

Adenitis 5 

Ansemia 5 

Bronchitis 6 

Cholecystitis, chronic 1 

Conjunctivitis, catarrhal, acute 8 

Constipation 20 



83 



Coryza 64 

Dermatitis venenata 1 

Eczema iissum 1 

Eczema squamosum 1 

Epistaxis 3 

Ethmoiditis, chronic 1 

Gastro-duodenitis 1 

Hay fever 1 

Hemorrhoids 1 

Indigestion 29 

Influenza 4 

Insomnia 5 

Jaundice, catarrhal 1 

Laryngitis 9 

Migraine 5 

Myalgia 9 

Neuralgia 5 

Neurasthenia, mild 20 

Neuritis 2 

Otitis media, catarrhal, acute 2 

Pharyngitis 28 

Rhinopharyngitis 27 

Sinusitis 2 

Tachycardia 3 

Tonsillitis 4 

Torticollis 1 

Tracheitis 15 

Urticaria 1 

Weak back 2 

Total 297 

Gynaecological — 

Amenorrhea 12 

Dysmenorrhea 9 

Menorrhagia and Metrorrhagia 17 

Retroversion of the uterus 1 

Total 39 



84 



The report of office work shows the result of the closer 
cooperation of the medical and athletic departments of the 
college, made possible by daily consultation hours. Prompt 
reports of injury, and a more complete supervision of the gen- 
eral physical condition of the students are thus secured. 

The very large number of mild cases of pharyngitis, 
coryza and allied conditions treated in the office during the 
year, together with the relatively small number of severe . 
cases needing infirmary treatment, seems to show clearly that 
early care, prompt isolation and careful disinfection are of 
very definite value in preventing the spread of such condi- 
tions. 

Should an epidemic at any time occur, we are still with- 
out adequate infirmary accommodations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Anne H. Thomas, 
, Visiting Physician. 



Appendices. 



Promotions, Reappointments, and Changes in the Academic 
and Administrative Staff for the Year 1910-11. 

Joseph W. Warren, M.D., reappointed Associate Professor of Physi- 
ology. 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D., promoted to be Recording Dean and 
Assistant to the President. 

Wilmer Cave Wright, Ph.D., reappointed Associate Professor of 
Greek. 

Henry Nevill Sanders, Ph.D., Professor of Greek, returned after 
one semester's leave of absence on account of illness. 

William Roy Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History, granted 
leave of absence for one year on account of illness. 

J. Edmund Wright, M.A., Associate Professor of Mathematics, died 
February 20, 1910. 

Clarence Carroll Clark, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English, 
term expired. 

Tenney Frank, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin, granted leave 
of absence for one year. 

Nettie Maria Stevens, Ph.D., appointment as Associate in Experi- 
mental Morphology extended. 

Carleton Fairchild Brown, Ph.D., promoted to be Professor of Eng- 
lish Philology. 

Caroline Louise Ransom, Ph.D., Associate Professor of the History 
of Art and of Classical Archaeology, resigned to accept an Assist- 
ant Curatorship in Egyptian Art at the Metropolitan Museum, 
New York City. 

James Barnes, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Professor of Physics. 

Theodore de Leo de Laguna, Ph.D., promoted to be Professor of Phil- 
osophy. 

Hans Weyhe, Ph.D., Associate in Teutonic Philology and Sanskrit, 
resigned. 

85 



86 



Marion Pabris, Ph.D., reappointed Associate in Economics. 

William Henry Allison, Ph.D., Associate in History, resigned to 
accept the Professorship of Ecclesiastical History and the Dean- 
ship of the Theological Seminary in Colgate University. 

Orie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate in Compara- 
tive Literature and Elizabethan Literature. 

Alfred Horatio Upham, Ph.D., appointed Associate Professor of Eng- 
lish Literature. Dr. Upham received the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts from Miami University in 1897, and of Master of Arts in 
1898. He holds also the degree of Master of Arts from Harvard 
University, 1901, and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from 
Columbia University, 1908. He was a graduate student at Har- 
vard University from 1900 to 1902 ; and University Fellow in 
Comparative Literature at Columbia University from 1905 to 
1906. From 1897 to 1900 he was Instructor in Latin and Greek 
in Miami University ; from 1902 to 1905 he was Professor of 
English in the Agricultural College of Utah; from 1906 to 1908 
he was Associate Professor of English, and from 1908 to 1910 
Professor of English and head of the Department in Miami Uni- 
versity. 

E. Raymond Turner, Ph.D., appointed Associate in History. Dr. 

Turner received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from St. John's 
College in 1904, and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from 
Johns Hopkins University in 1910. He held a Fellowship in 
Johns Hopkins University from 1909 to 1910. 

Chester Albert Reeds, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate in Geology. 

Agathe Lasch, Ph.D., appointed Associate in Teutonic Philology. 
Dr. Lasch is of Berlin, Germany. She studied at the University 
of Halle from 1906 to 1907, and at the University of Heidelberg 
from 1907 to 1910, receiving the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
in 1909. She passed the state examination pro facilitate docendi 

at Karlsruhe in 1910. 

• ■ -II—,—, 

Samuel Arthur King, A.M., reappointed Non-Resident Lecturer in 
English Diction. 

Roland G. Kent, Ph.D., appointed Non-Resident Lecturer in Sans- 
krit in November, 1909, term expired. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., promoted .to be Reader in English 
and Lecturer in Art. 

F. Warren Wright, Ph.D., appointed Lecturer in Latin for one year 

in the absence of Professor Tenney Frank. Dr. Wright received 
the degrees of Bachelor of Arts from Wesleyan University in 
1906, Master of Arts from Harvard University in 1908, and Doctor 



87 

of Philosophy from Princeton University in 1910. He was a 
graduate student in Wesleyan University from 1906 to 1907, Har- 
vard University from 1907 to 1908, and Fellow in Classics, 
Princeton University, from 1908 to 1910. 

Paul Leland Haworth, Ph.D., appointed Lecturer in History for 
one year in the absence of Professor William Roy Smith. Dr. 
Haworth received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the Uni- 
versity of Indiana in 1899, and the degree of Master of Arts in 
1901 ; also the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Columbia 
University in 1906. He was Teacher of History in the Michigan 
Northern State Normal School from 1901 to 1902; Tutor in 
History in Teachers' College, Columbia University, from 1904 to 
1906, and Lecturer in History in Columbia University Semester I, 
1906 to 1907. 

Harry Bateman, M.A., appointed Lecturer in Mathematics. Mr. Bate- 
man is of Manchester, England. He was Senior Wrangler 
(bracketed) in the Mathematical Tripos, University of Cambridge, 
1903, and obtained a first class in Division I, Part II, Mathe- 
matical Tripos, 1904. He was Smith's Prizeman in 1905 ; student 
in Gottingen and Paris, 1905 to 1906 ; Fellow of Trinity College, 
Cambridge, since 1905 ; Lecturer in Mathematics at the University 
of Liverpool 'from 1906 to 1907, and Reader in Mathematical 
Physics at Manchester University from 1907 to 1910. 

C. Leonard Woolley, M.A., appointed Non-Resident Lecturer in Egyp- 
tian Art. Mr. Woolley was awarded an open scholarship at New 
College, Oxford, in 1899. He received the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts from the University of Oxford in 1903, and the degree 
of Master of Arts in 1907. He took a second class under the 
Public Examiners in Litterae Humaniores in 1903, and in the 
Theological School in 1904. He has excavated in Great Britain, 
Italy and Nubia. He was appointed Assistant Keeper of the Ash- 
molean Museum in 1905, and Assistant Curator in the Egyptian 
Department of the Museum of the University of Pennsylvania 
in ,1907. He has been a member of the three Eckley B. Coxe 
Expeditions to Nubia in 1907 to 1910. 

Rose Chamberlin, M.A., Reader in German, died, June 21, 1910. 

Harriet Randolph, Ph.D., reappointed Demonstrator in Biology and 
Reader in Botany and granted leave of absence from the Christ- 
mas Vacation to the end of the Academic Year 1910-11. 

Katharine Ftjllerton, A.M., Reader in English, resigned on account 
of her marriage. 

Regina Katharine Crandaix, Ph.D., reappointed Reader in English. 



Abby Kirk, A.B., reappointed Reader iu Elementary Greek. 

Maud Downing, A.B., Reader in Semitic Languages, term expired. 

Clara Leonora Nicolay, Ph.D., Reader in Elementary French, re- 
signed in March, 1910, to accept an Instructorship in German 
in Wellesley College. Her unexpired term was filled out by Marie 
Seward King, A.M. 

Virginia Ragsdaxe, Ph.D., Reader in Mathematics, term expired. 

Ltllie Deming Loshe, Ph.D., reappointed Reader in English. 

Content Shepard Nichols, A.M., Reader in English, term expired. 

Elizabeth Andros Foster, A.M., Reader in Latin, term expired. 

Isabelle Stone, Ph.D., Reader in Greek for Second Semester, 1909-10, 
in the absence of Professor Henry Nevill Sanders, term expired. 

Helen Elizabeth Huff, Ph.D., Reader in Mathematics for the Second 
Semester, 1909-10, term expired. 

Emma Haeberli, Ph.D., appointed Reader in Elementary French. 
Dr. Haeberli is of Berne, Switzerland. She received the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy from the University of ■ Berne in 1903 ; 
was a graduate student and a tutor in French and German at 
the University of Berne from 1904 to 1905 and from 1906 to 1909. 
In the year 1909 to 1910 she was Instructor in French and Ger- 
man in Virginia College, Roanoke, Virginia. 

Martha Plaisted, A.B., appointed Reader in English. Miss Plaisted 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr College 
in 1908, and was Instructor in English in Sweet Briar College 
from 1908 to 1910. 

Mary Jeffers, A.M., appointed Reader in Elementary German. Miss 
Jeffers received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr 
College in 1S95, and the degree of Master of Arts in 1897. She has 
been a graduate student at Bryn Mawr College from 1895 to 1898, 
1903 to 1904, and 1906 to 1907, and a student at the Universities 
of Munich and Halle, from 1898 to 1899, and at the University 
of Bonn in 1905. She was a teacher of Latin in the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, from 1895 to 1898, and head of 
the Latin Department from 1897 to 1907 ; teacher of Latin and 
History in the Girls' Latin School, Baltimore, Md., from 1900 
to 1901 ; Supervisor of Greek, Latin, German and" History Depart- 
ments in Brantwood Hall, Bronxville, Lawrence Park, N.Y., from 
1905 to 1907, and Private Tutor from 1892 to 1910. 

Margaret Grace Skinner, appointed Reader in English. Miss Skin- 
ner is from Bedford, England. She studied at Girton College, 



89 

Cambridge, England, and took the Mediaeval and Modern Lan- 
guages Tripos, Part I, 1905, and Part II, 1906. From 1907 to 
1910 she was teacher of English in Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, 
Conn. 

Frances D'Arcy Thompson, M.A., appointed Reader in Latin. Miss 
Thompson is from Dublin, Ireland. She studied at Girton College, 
Cambridge, England, and took a First Class in the Classical 
Tripos, Part I, in 1906, and the degree of Master of Arts, with 
Honours in Ancient Classics at the Royal University of Ireland, 
in 1907. She was examiner in Latin for the Royal University 
of Ireland, in 1907 and 1908; Classical Mistress in the High 
School, Portsmouth, England, from 1906 to 1908, and Classical 
Teacher in Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn., from 1908 to 1910. 

Edna Aston Shearer, A.B., appointed Reader in English. Miss 
Shearer received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr 
College in 1904. She was Junior Fellow in Philosophy in Bryn 
Mawr College from 1904 to 1905, and Fellow in Philosophy from 
1906 to 1907 ; holder of the President's Fellowship and student 
in the Universities of Edinburgh and Aberdeen from 1905 to 
1906 ; she was teacher of English in the Baldwin School, Bryn 
Mawr, from 1907 to 1910, and graduate student in Bryn Mawr 
College from 1907 to 1908. 

Lily Ross Taylor, A.B., Reader and Demonstrator in the History 
of Art and Classical Archaeology. Miss Taylor graduated from 
the University of Wisconsin in 1906. She came to Bryn Mawr 
College where she was a scholar in Latin from 1906 to 1907. 
Fellow in Latin from 1907 to 1908, and Graduate Student and 
Reader in Latin from 1908 to 1909. In 1909 she went abroad 
and studied at the University of Bonn for the Summer Semester 
and at the American School of Classical Studies in Rome from 
1909 to 1910. 

Ellwood Austin Welden, Ph.D., appointed Non-Resident Reader 
in Italian. Dr. Welden received the degree of Bachelor of Science 
from the University of Pennsylvania in 1903, and the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy in 1906. He held the Harrison Scholarship 
in Indo-Enropean Philology in the University of Pennsylvania 
from 1903 to 1904, and a Fellowship from 1904 to 1906. He was 
absent on leave as a student in the University of Berlin for the 
Summer Semester, 1905. He was Shattuck Scholar in Indie 
Philology in Harvard University from 1906 to 1907, American 
Consular Assistant in Washington, D. G, from 1907 to 1908, 
American Deputy Consul-General in Paris, 1908 to 1909, and in 
Budapest in 1909. . He studied in Paris and in Bologna, Italy, 
from 1909 to 1910. 



90 



Frances Lowateb, B.Sc, Ph.D., Demonstrator in Physics, resigned 
to accept the Professorship in Physics in the Western College 
for Women, Oxford, O. 

Caroline Vinia Lynch, A.M., Demonstrator in the History of Art 
and Classical Archaeology, resigned. 

Gertrude Langdon Heritage, A.M., reappointed Demonstrator in 
Chemistry. 

Mabel Kathryn Frehafer, A.B., appointed Demonstrator in Physics. 
Miss Frehafer received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn 
Mawr College in 1908. She was a graduate student in Physics 
at the University of Wisconsin, from 1908 to 1909, and Fellow 
in Physics at Bryn Mawr College from 1909 to 1910. 

Abigail Camp Dimon, A.M., appointed Demonstrator in Biology. Miss 
Dimon received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr 
College in 1896, and the degree of Master of Arts in 1899. She 
was Vice-Principal of the High School, Clinton, N. Y., from 1896 
to 1898, Assistant Teacher of English in the Utica Academy, 
Utica, N. T., from 1897 to 1898, Graduate Student at Bryn Mawr 
College, from 1898 to 1899 and from 1901 to 1904; Warden of 
Radnor Hall, Bryn Mawr College, from 1901 to 1904; teacher 
in the Balliol School, Utica, from 1904 to 1908, and the New 
School, Utica, from 1908 to 1910. 

Anna Bell Lawther, A.B., reappointed Secretary of the College. 

Ethel Walker, A.M., Recording Secretary and Appointment Sec- 
retary, resigned. 

Edith Orlady, A.B., appointed Recording Secretary. Miss Orlady 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege in 1902. She was Warden of Pembroke Hall West from 
1903 to 1905, and of Rockefeller Hall from 1905 to 1906. She 
has been a Graduate Student at Bryn Mawr College from 1905 
to 1906 and from 1907 to 1909. 

Mary Ellen Baker, A.B., B.L.S., reappointed Head Cataloguer. 

Bessie Homer Jennings, reappointed Assistant Cataloguer. 

Elizabeth Lawrence Gray, reappointed Assistant Director of Ath- 
letics and Gymnastics. 

Mary Warren Taylor, reappointed Secretary to the Director of Ath- 
letics and Gymnastics. 

Anne Heath Thomas, M.D., reappointed Visiting Physician of the 
College. 

C. G. Davis, M.D., appointed Consultant Orthopaedist. 

William G. Spiller, M.D., appointed Consultant Neurologist. 



91 

Charles A. Worden, C.E., appointed Business Manager. Mr. Worden 
graduated as Civil Engineer from the Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute where he was Instructor in Mathematics and Survey- 
ing from 1904 to 1909. He was at the same time Street Sur- 
veyor in Troy, N. Y., and Assistant Superintendent of Construc- 
tion, Emma Willard School Buildings, 1909 to 1910. 

• ! . Uf I 
May L. Manning, Junior Bursar, term expired. 

Margaret A. Proctor, A.B., appointed Junior Bursar. Miss Proctor 
is a graduate of the University of Montreal. For one year she 
was purchasing agent in Whittier Hall, Columbia University. 

Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., reappointed Warden of Pembroke 
Halls, East and West. 

Alice Anthony, A.B., reappointed Warden of Denbigh Hall. 

Virginia Tryon Stoddard, A.M., Warden of Radnor Hall, resigned 
on account of illness. 

Harriet Jean Crawford, A.B., reappointed Warden of Rockefeller 
Hall. 

Bertha Margaret Laws, A.B., reappointed Assistant to the Warden 
of Pembroke Halls, East and West. 

Fbtedrika Margaret Heyl, A.B., Warden of Merion Hall, resigned 
on account of illness. 

Helen Remington CAlder, appointed Warden of Radnor Hall. Miss 
Calder was a student of Bryn Mawr College from 1899 to 1901. 
She completed Miss Stoddard's term of service as Warden of 
Radnor Hall from March 21, 1910. 

Caro Fries Buxton, A.B., appointed Warden of Merion Hall to fill 
vacancy caused by Miss Heyl's resignation, resigned. 

Ethel Harper, A.B., appointed Warden of Merion Hall. Miss Harper 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr College 
in 1907. 



II. 



Fellowships and Scholarships Conferred for the \Year 
1910-11. 

Helen Muller Bley, Bryn Mawr European Fellow. 

Philadelphia. Prepared hy the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of the First (equal) Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsyl- 
vania and the Southern States, 1906-07, and of Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholarship, 11)06-10 ; Holder of the Brooke Hall 
Memorial Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Helen Maxwell King, Mary E. Garrett European Fellow. 

Olivet. Mich. A.B., Olivet College. 1907. and A.M.. 1908. Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09, and Fellow in Romance Languages, 1909-10. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck President's European Fellow. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1908-09. and Scholar in French, 1909-10. 

Jane Annetta Harrison, 

Ottendorfer Memorial Research Fellow in Teutonic Philology. 

La Plata, Mo. A.B. and B.S.. University of Missouri, 1906, and A.M., 1907. 
Graduate Student, University of Missouri, 1908-09 ; Fellow in German, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1909-10. 

Annie Louise Macleod, Research Fellow in Chemistry. 

Grace Bay, Nova Scotia. A.B., McGill University. 1904, M.Sc, 1905. and 
Ph.D., 1910. Demonstrator in Chemistry, McGill University, 1905-08 ; 
Assistant in Chemistry, Barnard College, 1908-09 ; Fellow in Chemistry, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1909-10. 

Cornelia Catlin Coulter, Felloio in Greelc. 

Ferguson. Mo. A.B., Washington University. 1907. Graduate Scholar in 
Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08, and Fellow in L.ltin. 1909-10. Holder 
of the President's European Fellowship and Student, University of Munich, 
1908-09. 

Elizabeth Andros Foster Felloio in Latin. 

Sharon, Mass. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 190S, and A.M., 1909. Graduate 
Scholar in Latin. Brvn Mawr College, 1908-09. and Reader in Latin and 
Graduate Student, 1909-10. 

Mary Caroline Spalding, Fellow in English. 

Brvn Mawr. Pa. A.B., Vassar College, 1901. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College. 1906-08, and Graduate Scholar, 1908-10; Teacher in the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1906-10. 

Marie Seward King Fellow in German. 

Olivet. Mich. A.B.. Olivet College. 1907, and A.M., 1908. Professor of 
German and French. Des Moines College. 190S-09 ; Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1909-10, and Substitute Reader in French, March to June, 
1910. 

Sarah White Davis, Fellow in History. 

Lapeer, Mich. A.B.. Mt. Holyoke College. 1909. Graduate Student, Mt. 
Holyoke College, 1909-10. 

Jane Cushing Shoemaker,* Special Fellow in Economics and Politics. 

Philadelphia. A.B. Brvn Mawr College, 1905. Graduate student Bryn 
Mawr College, 1907-OS : Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1909-10. 

* Deceased, August, 1910. 

92 



93 

Marie Gertrude Rand, Fellow in Psychology. 

Brooklyn, New York City. A.B., Cornell University, 1908. Graduate Scholar 
in Psychology, Bryn 'Mawr College, 1908-09: and Fellow in Philosophy, 
1909-10. 

Helen Cox Bowerman, Fellow in Arch ecology. 

Point Pleasant, N. J. A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1901 ; A.M., University 
of Rochester. 1903. Teacher of English and Latin in the High School, 
Macedon, N. Y., 1903-05; Instructor in Latin, Western College for Women, 
Oxford, O., 1905-07 ; Associate Professor of Latin, 1907-08 ; Graduate 
Scholar in Archaeology, Brvn Mawr College 190S-09, and Fellow in Archae- 
ology, 1909-10. 

Margaret Elizabeth Brusstar, Fellow in Mathematics. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903. Teacher of Latin and Math- 
ematics, Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh. Pa.. 1903-04 ; Teacher of Math- 
ematics in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa.. 1904-10; Graduate 
Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-0S, and Graduate 
Student, 1908-10. 

Irene Maud Mathews, Fellow in Physics. 

Sheffield, England. Girton College, University of Cambridge, England, 1906-10. 
First Class Honours, Cambridge Mathematical Tripos, Part I, 1909; and 
Part II, 1910. 

Minnie Almira Graham, Fellow in Chemistry . 

Lockport, N. Y. A.B., Mt. Holyoke College. 1900, and A.M.. University of 
Michigan, 1906. Fellow in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 190G-H7 : in 
Charge of Departments of Physics and Chemistry, Lake Erie College, 
1907-10. 

Mary Edith Pinney, Felloto in Biology. 

Wilson, Kans. A.B., Kansas State University, 1908, and A.M., 1910. 
Teaching Fellow in Zoology, Kansas State University, 1909-10, and High 
School Instructor, Alma, Kans., 1909-10. 

Louise Baggott Morgan, Special Fellow in English. 

Providence, R. I. A.B. and A.M., Brown University, 1907. Graduate Scholar 
in English, Bryn Mawr College. 1907-10. 

Ethel Bright Ashford, .' British Graduate Scholar. 

London, England. B.A., London University, 1906. Serial Study Diploma, 
Birmingham University. 1909. Resident Scholar. Woodbrooke College, 
1908-09 ; Student, London School of Economics, 1909-10. 

Margaret Stewart Dismorr, British Graduate Scholar. 

Harrow on the Hill.. England. Newnham College. University of Cambridge. 
England, 1907-10. First Class Honours, Cambridge Mediaeval and Modern 
Languages Tripos, 1910. 

Mabel Hattersley, British Graduate Scholar. 

Harrowsate, England. Student, Royal College of Science, South Kensineton, 
England. 1900-04 ; Bedford College. London. 1904-05, and King's College, 
London. 1908-09. Associate. Royal College of Science, 1904. Head Science 
Instructor, Old Palace School. Croydon, 1905-06 ; Instructor in Chemistry, 
Datchelor College, Camberwell, 1906-08. 

Hilda Phoebe Hudson, British Graduate Scholar. 

Cambridge, England. Newnham College. University of Cambvidee. England, 
1900-04. First Class Honours, Cambridge Mathematical Tripos. Tart I, 
1903 ; Part II, 1904. Berlin University, Winter Semester, 1904-05. M.A., 
Trinity College, Dublin, 1906 ; Staff Lecturer in Mathematics, Newnham 
College, 1905-10. 

Elisabeth Klein, German Graduate Scholar. 

Gottingen, Germany. University of Gottingen, 1908-10. 

Edith Adams, Graduate Scholar in Greek. 

Philadelphia. A.B.. Wellesley Colleee. 1908. Librarian in Y. W. C. A. 
Library, New York City, 1902-05 ; Utica Free Library, 1909-10. 



94 

Bessie May Burnell, Graduate Scholar in Physics. 

Greenwich, O. A.B., Lake Erie College, 1908. University of Michigan 
Summer School, 1909. Instructor in Physics and Mathematics, Emerson 
Institute, Mobile, Ala., 1908-09, and in Lake Erie College, 1909-10. 

Alice Hill Bybne, Graduate Scholar in Greek. 

Lancaster, Pa. A.B., Wellesley College, 1908. Teacher of Latin and Greek 
in the Union High School, Coleraine, Pa., 1899-1900; in Mrs. Blackwood's 
School, Lancaster. 1896-99, and 1900-01, and in Miss Stahr's School, 
Lancaster, 1901-07 ; Principal of the Shippen School, Lancaster, 1908-09 ; 
Teacher of Latin in Miss Hills's School, Philadelphia, 1909-10. 

Mabie Josephine Carroll, Graduate Scholar in History. 

Columbus, O. A.B., Ohio State University, 1909, and A.M., 1910. 

Ruth Collins, Graduate Scholar in Psychology. 

Pitman Grove, N. J. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910. 

Frances Allen Foster, Graduate Scholar m English. 

Providence, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1909. Scholar in English, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1909-10. 

Mabel Mathewson Keiller, Graduate Scholar in English. 

Narberth, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Private Tutor, 1908-09. 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College. 1909-10. 

Nora Lewis, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Balmy Beach, Toronto, Canada. A.B., University of Toronto, 1908. Teacher 
in Westminster College, Toronto, 1908-10. 

Bertha Cornelia Norris, Graduate Scholar m Latm. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College. 1904. Teacher of Latin and Greek and Head of 
the Department of Ancient Languages, Irving College, 1904-06 ; Teacher in 
Miss Mason's School, Tarrytown, N. Y.. 1906-07 ; Head of Miss Norris's 
School, Germantown, 1907-10 ; Reader in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08 ; 
Reader in Latin for the College Entrance Examination Board, 1908. 

Millicent Pond, Graduate Scholar in Mathematics. 

State College, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910. 

Adah Blanche Roe, Graduate Scholar in German. 

Omaha, Neb. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1909. Scholar in German, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1909-10. 

Helen Estabrook Sandison, .Graduate Scholar in English. 

Terre Haute, Ind. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1906, and A.M., 1907. Gradu- 
ate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07 ; Assistant Principal, of the High 
School, Brookville, Ind., 1907-08 ; Fellow in English. Bryn Mawr College, 
1908-09 ; Special European Fellow and Student, University of Oxford, 
1909-10. 

Isabella Marion Vosburgh, Graduate Scholar in Chemistry. 

Oak Park, 111. A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1910. 

Alice Louise Dlxon, Guilford College Scholar. 

Yadkinville, N. C. A.B., Guilford College, 1910. 

Emily Kent Kissick, Perm College Scholar. 

Oskaloosa, la. A.B., Penn College, 1910. 

Maude Elizabeth Reynolds, Earlham College Scholar. 

Richmond, Ind. A.B., Earlham College, 1910. 

Hannah Sharpless Pennell, Graduate Foundation Scholar. 

Wawa, Pa. A.B., Cornell University, 1906. Teacher in the Westtown 
Boarding School, 189S-1900, 1903-05, 1906-09. 

Leah Tapper Cadbury, Foundation ScJwlar. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. 



95 

Anna Hartshorne, Foundation Scholar. 

Brighton, Md. Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. 
Foundation Scholar, 1908-10. 

Rachel Estelle Albright King, Foundation Scholar. 

Birmingham, England. Prepared by the Edgbaston High School for Girls, 
Edgbaston, England. 

Alpine Bodine Parker, Foundation Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Foundation 
Scholar, 1907-10. 

Elizabeth Taylor Shipley, Foundation Scholar. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Foundation Scholar, 1909-10. 

Katharine Dodd, . . First New England States Matriculation Scholar. 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. Prepared by Miss Haskell and Miss Dean's School, 
Boston, Mass. 

Mary Richardson Schmidt, 

Second New England States Matriculation Scholar. 
York, Pa. Prepared by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 

Jean Scobie Davis, 

First New York and New Jersey Matriculation Scholar. 
Princeton, N. J. Prepared by the Princeton School, Princeton. 

Katharine Huntington, 

Second New York and New Jersey Matriculation Scholar. 
Princeton, N. J. Prepared by the Princeton School, Princeton. 

Martha Barbour Hobson, 

First Western States Matriculation Scholar. 
Chicago, 111. Prepared by the University School for Girls, Chicago. 
Helen Harper Hinde, . .Second Western States Matriculation Scholar. 
Chicago, 111. Prepared by the Chicago Latin School, Chicago. 

Janet Baird, 

First Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar. 
Sharon Hill, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Dorothy Wentworth Skerrett, 

Second Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 
Mildred Baird, .. .Trustees 1 Philadelphia Girls 1 High School Scholar. 

Sharon Hill, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City 
Scholar, 1910-11. 

Grace Bartholomew, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls 1 High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Sadie Beliekowsky, 

Trustees 1 Philadelphia Girls 1 High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1908-10. 

Angela Darkow, . .Trustees 1 ' Philadelphia Girls 1 High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
First Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 
1907-08. and of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 
1907-10 ; Holder of the Maria -Hopper Sophomore Scholarship, 1908-09. 



96 



Anna Constance Heffekn, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Trustees' Philadelphia (iirls' High School Scholarship, 1908-10. 

Ellen Esther Pottbekg, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1907-10. 

Adelaide Douglas Simpson, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Miriam Elsie Ward, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Catharine Anita Preston, 

Trustees' Lower Merlon High School Scholar. 
Ardmore, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore. 
Pauline Ida Clarke, James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar. 

New York City. Prepared by the Balliol School, Utiea, N. Y. James E. 
Rhoads Sophomore Scholar, 1909-10. 

Marion Dorothea Clinton, . . . .James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar. 

Portland, Ore. Prepared bv Portland Academy, Portland. First Western 
States Matriculation Scholar, 1909-10. 

Ruth Coe Manchester, Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar. 

Winsted, Conn. Prepared by the Gilbert High School, Winsted. Second New 
England States Matriculation Scholar, 1909-10. 

Marjokie Frances Murray, Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar. 

Delhi, N. Y. Prepared by the Delaware Academy, Delhi, and by St. Agnes' 
School, Albany, N. Y. 

Norah Cam, Special Maria Hopper Scholar. 

Bishop's Stortford, England. Prepared by private tuition. Maria Hopper 
Sophomore Scholar, 1909-10. 

Marion Delia Crane, Special Maria Hopper Scholar. 

Providence, R. I. Prepared by the High School. Abington. Mass., and by 
private tuition. Holder of the .Tames E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 
1908-09, and of James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Laura Lawrenson Byrne Mary E. Stevens Junior Scholar. 

EUicott City, Md. Prepared by St. Timothy's School, Catonsville, Md. 

Helen Tredway, . .Maria L. Eastman BrooJce Hall Memorial Scholar. 

Dubuque, la. Prepared by the High School, Dubuque. Holder of the Second 
Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the Western States, 1907-08. 

Emma Forster, Anna M. Powers Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School. Philadelphia. Holder of 
Citv Scholarship, 1907-10. Holder of Anna M. Powers Memorial Scholar- 
ship, 1909-10. 

Caroline Letchworth Justice. 

Thomas H. Powers Memorial Scholar. 

Narberth, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School. Ardmore. Pa. 
Holder of the Trustees' Lower Merion High School Scholarship, 1907-10. 

Margaret Adelaide Munroe L. V. B. Saul Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared bv the Girls' High School. Philadelphia. Holder of 
the L. C. B. Saul Memorial Scholarship, 1909-10. 



97 

Helen Marguerite Ramsey, ... .Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Scholar. 
Rosemont. Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore. 

Pearl Boring Mitchell, 

Minnie Murdoch Kendrick Memorial Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School. Philadelphia. 

Elizabeth Grecian Balderston, Bryn Mwvr School Scholai-. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Ethel McLane Lee, Bryn Mawr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryu Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Rebecca Renshaw Lewis, Bryn Mawr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1908-10. 

Mary Van Absdale Tongue, Bryn Mawr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of 
Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Ramona Beatrice Miller, Simon Muhr Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Simon Muhr Scholarship' and of First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship 
for Pennsylvania and tne Southern States, 1909-10. 

Cecelia Irene Baechle, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Janet Baird, City Scholar. 

Sharon Hill, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and 
Southern States. 

Mildred Baird, ^ City Scholar. 

Sharon Hill, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship. 

Emily - Edna Caskey, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1907-10. 

Julia Chickering, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1907-10. 

Jessie Williams Clifton, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prenared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship' 1907-10. 

Emma Forster, City Sclwlar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School. Philadelphia. Holder of 
Citv Scholarship, 1907-i0, and of Anna M. Powers Memorial Scholarship, 
1909-10. 

Cecile Adler Goldsmith, .City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1908-10. 

Sara Marion Halpen City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship, 1909-10. 

Margaret Adelaide Munroe, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' Hiarh School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
City Scholarship and of L. C. B. Saul Memorial Scholarship, 1909-10. 



98 

Dorothy Wentworth Skerrett, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of 
Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and 
Southern States, 1909-10. 

Lorle Ida Stecher, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Manual Training High School, Indianapolis, 
' Ind., and by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1908-10. 

Lucile Thompson, George W. Fetter Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Gertrude Marie Elcock Special Scholar. 

Glenside, Pa. Prepared by the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. Maria 
Hopper Sophomore Scholar, 1909-10. 

Sophie Katharine Forster, Special Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Grace Bagnall Branham, George W. Child's Prize Essayist. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Mary Dorothy Whitall Worthington, 

Mary Helen Ritchie Memorial Prize. 
New York City. Prepared by the High School, Kensington, London, England. 



III. 

Degrees Conferred during the Academic Year 1909-10. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 
5 

Alice Middleton Boring, of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904, group, Chemistry and Biology, and A.M., 
1905. Graduate Scholar in Biology and Assistant in the Biological Labo- 
ratory, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-05 ; Moore Fellow in Zoology, University 
of Pennsylvania. 1905-06 ; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1906-07 ; Instructor in Zoology, Vassar College, 1907-08 ; Student, Univer- 
sity of Wurzburg and Zoological Station. Naples, 1908-09. Holder of the 
Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, 1907-08, and Instructor in 
Zoology, University of Maine, 1909-10. Subjects : Zoology and Physiology. 
Thesis : A Study of the Spermatogenesis of Twenty-two Species of the 
Membracidae, Jassidae, Cercopidae and Fulgoridae. 

Louise Dudley, of Kentucky. 

A.B., Georgetown College, 1905. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1905-06 ; Second Semester, 1909-10 ; Fellow in English, 1906-07 ; Teacher 
in Kemper Hall, Kenosha, Wis., 1907-08 ; Research Student in the Biblio- 
theque Nationale, Paris, 1908-09 ; University of Oxford, 1909. Subjects : 
English Philology, English Literature, and English History. Thesis : The 
Egyptian Elements in the Legend of the Body and Soul. 

Helen Hawley Nichols, of Ohio. 

A.B., Marietta College. 1906. Graduate Student Bryn Mawr College, 
19G6-07, and Graduate Scholar in Semitic Languages, 1907-08, 1909-10. 
Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship and Student, Univer- 
sity of Oxford, 1908-09. Subjects : Hebrew, New Testament Greek and 
Aramaic. Thesis: The Composition of the Elihu Speeches (Job 32-37). 

Ellen Seton Ogden, of New York. 

L.B., University of Nashville, 1895. Teacher of Latin and Mathematics in 
the Winthrop Model School, Peabody Normal College, 1895-96 ; Graduate 
Student in Teutonic Philology and Semitic Languages, Bryn Mawr College, 
1896-98 ; Junior Bursar, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-1901 ; Studeut in Semit- 
ics, Columbia University, 1901-02 ; Head of the English Department, St. 
Agnes's School, Albany, N. Y., 1902-09, and Instructor in Biblical Study, 
1904-09 ; Graduate Scholar in Semitic Languages, 1909-10. Subjects : 
Assyrian and Hebrew. Thesis : The Origin of the Gunu-Signs in Baby- 
lonian. 

Grace Potter Reynolds, of Connecticut. 

A.B., Smith College, 1904 ; A.M., Columbia University, 1905. Graduate Stu- 
dent, Columbia University, 1904-05 ; Assistant in Chemistry, State College, 
1905-06, and Barnard College, 1906-08 ; Fellow in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1908-09. and Graduate Student, 1908-10. Subjects: Organic Chem- 
istry and Physical and Inorganic Chemistry and Physics. Thesis : The 
Reaction between Organic Magnesium Compounds and Unsaturated Com- 
pounds Containing Alkoxyl Groups. 

MASTER OF ARTS. 

5 

Maria Hawes Albee, of Connecticut. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904. Graduate Student in Greek, Latin, and 
Archaeology, Yale University, 1904-06 ; Instructor in the High School, 
New Haven, Conn., 1904-06, 1907-09 ; Head of the Classical Department 
and Assistant Principal, Tudor Hall, Indianapolis, Ind., 1906-07 ; Assistant 
in the Secretary's Office, Yale University, 1908-09 ; Graduate Scholar in 
Greek, Bryn Mawr College, and Teacher of Latin in Miss Wright's School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1909-10. 

99 



100 

Makgaket Sibner Dillin, of Pennsylvania. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Graduate Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1909-10. 

Helen Stieglitz Jurist, of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Graduate Scholar in German, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1909-10. 

"Mabel Mathewson Keiller, of Pennsylvania. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
190S-10. 

Jane Gushing Shoemaker,* of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College. 1905. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1907-OS ; Fellow in Economics and Politics, Bryn Mawr College, 1909-10. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

69 

May Putnam, of New York City. 

Prepared hy the Brearley School, New York City. Group : History and 
Economics and Politics. Work for the degree completed February, 1910. 

Isabella May Pyfer, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Berlitz School and hy private tuition. Group : German and 
French. Work for the degree completed February, 1910. 

Mary Norton Allen, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by Wykeham Rise, Washington, Conn., and by private tuition. 
Group : Latin and French. 

Susanne Carey Allinson, of Rhode Island. 

Prepared by Miss Wheeler's School, Providence, and by the Bryn Mawr 
School, Baltimore, Md. Group : Greek and Latin. 

Mabel Pierce Ashley, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group : History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Dorothy Laing Ashton, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Swarthmore Preparatory School, Swarthmore, Pa. Swarth- 
niore College, 1905-06. Group : History and Economics and Politics. 

Ruth Babcoqk, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by the B. M. C. Durfee High School, Fall River, and by the Balliol 
School, Utica, N. Y. Group : Latin and French. 

Maria Georgina Bib-ble, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. Group : History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Irma Bertha Bixler, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Pennsylvania College for Women and by the Misses Kirk's 
School, Rosemont, Pa. Group : History and Economics and Politics. 

Helen Muller Bley, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of the First 
(equal) Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the 
Southern States, 1906-07, of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School 
Scholarship, 1906-10, and of the Brooke Hall Memorial Scholarship, 
1909-10. Group : Greek and Latin. 

Anita Uarda Boggs, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Misses Sergeant and Miss Bent's School, Harrisburg. Group : 
German and Spanish. 

* Deceased, August, 1911. 



101 

Grace Bagnall Braniiam. of Baltimore. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Group : Greek and Latin. 
Ruth Cabot, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by the Milton Academy, Milton. Group : Greek and Latin. 
Ethel Bird Chase, of Washington, D. C. 

Prepared by the Friends' School, Washington. Group : Economics and Pol- 
itics and Philosophy. 

Dorothy Martin Child, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared bv the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. Holder of Foundation 
Scholarship, 1905-09. Group : Latin and French. 

Dorothea Cole, of Illinois. 

Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group : History 
and Economics and Politics. 

Ruth Collins, of New Jersey. 

Prenared by the Drexel Institute. Philadelphia, and by private tuition. 
Holder of Anna M. Powers Memorial Scholarship, 1909-10. Group : Eng- 
lish and Philosophy. 

Caroline Bessie Cox, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by Miss Keyser's School, Philadelphia. Group : Latin and English. 
Elsie Deems, of New York. 

Prenared by the High School, Hornellsville, and by the Balliol School, . 
Utica, N. T. Group: English and German. 

Constance Deming, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City, and by the Balliol School, 
Utica, N. Y. Group : History and Economics and Politics. 

Elsa Denison, of Colorado. 

Prepared by the Manual Training High School, Denver, and by the Baldwin 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group : History and Economics and Politics. 

Mary Elizabetil Doheny, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa. Group : Latin 
and French. 

Katherine Mary Evans, of Kentucky. 

Prepared by the Bartholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati, O. Group : Chem- 
istry and Biology. 

Zip Solomons Falk, of Georgia. 

Prenared by Memminger Normal School. Charleston, and by private tuition. 
Group : Economics and Politics and Philosophy. 

Catharine Warren Goodale, of Hawaiian Islands. 

Prepared by Oahu College, Honolulu, H. I. Group: History and Economics 
and Politics. 

Josephine Healy. of Pennsylvania. 

Prenared by the Misses Kirk's School, Rosemont, Pa. Group : History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Frances Hale Hearne, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Radnor High School. "Wayne, by the Misses Shipley's 
School. Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. Group: Latin and Italian 
and Spanish. 

Miriam Margaret Hedges, of Texas. 

Prenared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group : History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Elizabeth Greer Hibben, of New Jersey. 

Prepared by the Princeton School. Princeton, N. J. Group : Latin and Ger- 



102 



Janet Tucker Howell, of Baltimore. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of Bryn Miawr 
School Scholarship, 1906-08. Group : Mathematics and Physics. 

Emily Elizabeth Howson, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Friends' Central School, Philadelphia, and by private 
tuition. Group : Physics and Biology. 

Helen Chrisman Ibey, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Collegiate Institute for Girls, Philadelphia, and by the 
Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group : Latin and Mathematics. 

Mary Agnes Irvine, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh. Group : Mathematics and 
Physics. 

Agnes Miller Irwin, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of Trustees' 

Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1906-10. Group: Latin and 

German. 

Lillie James, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1906-10. Group : Latin and English. 

Violet Hannah Keiller, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Central High School, Washington. D. C, by the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by Miss Sayward's scnool, Over- 
brook, Philadelphia. Group : Chemistry and Biology. 

Katharine Mildred Kelley, of Ohio. 

Prepared by the Central High School, Cleveland. Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, 1905-07. Group : Latin and German. 

Jeanne Benedict Kerr, of New York City. 

Prepared by Miss Spence's School, New York City. Group: History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Marion Shelmire Kirk, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1906-10 ; Holder of Maria Hopper Scholarship, 1907-08. Group : 
Latin and German. 

Mary Ethel Ladd, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1906-10. Holder of the Mary E. Stevens Scholarship, 1908-09. 
Group : Greek and Latin. 

Katharine Forbes Ltddell, of North Carolina. 

Prepared by the Calhoun-Chamberlain School, Montgomery, Ala. Holder 
of James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship, 1908-09 ; Holder of Maria Hopper 
Scholarship, 1909-10. Group : Latin and English. 

Louise Edgerton Merrill, of New York. 

Prepared by Miss Cooper's School, Albany, N. Y., by the Brearley School, 
New York City, and by private tuition. Group : Latin and Mathematics. 

Marguerite Broades Morgan, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Lower Merion High School. Group : Latin and German. 

Edith Hamilton Murphy, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia, and by Miss Hills'a School 
for Girls, Philadelphia. Group : Latin and English. 

Dorothy Nearing, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1906-10. Group : Mathematics and Chemistry. 

Millicent Pond, of Pennsylvania. 

Trepared by private tuition. Pennsylvania State College, 1905-07. Group: 
Mathematics and Geology. 



108 



Lucie Vaughan Reichenbach, of Indiana. 

Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. 
Group : Latin and French. 

Henrietta Sanforo Riggs, of Washington, D. C. 

Prepared by the Friends' School, Wnshington, and by private tuition. 
Group: History and Economics and Politics. 

Mary Longaker Root, of Philadelphia. 

Prennred by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of City Scholar- 
ship, 1906-10. Group : Latin and Mathematics. 

Katherine Livingston Rotan, of Texas. 

Prepared by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. Group : Chemistry and Biology 

Helen Townsend Scott, of Baltimore. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Group : Greek and English. 

Evelyn Elizabeth Seely, of New York. 

Prepared by the State Normal School, Brockport. Mt. Holyoke College, 
1906-07. Group: Latin and German. 

Henrietta Wogan Sharp, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School. Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private 
tuition. Group : English and Philosophy. 

Margaret Juliet Shearer, of New York City. 

Prennred by the Merrill-Van Laer School, New York City, and by the 
Brearley School, New York City. Group : Greek and English. 

Mary Boyd Shipley, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Holder of Foun- 
dation Scholarship, 1909-10. Group : Latin and French. 

Charlotte Victorine Simonds, of New York City. 

Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. Holder of the Second 
Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for New York, New Jersey, and 
Delaware, 1906-07. Group, Mathematics and Physics. 

Hilda Worthington Smith, of New York. 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. Group : Economics and Poli- 
tics and Philosophy. 

Frances Louise Storer, of Ohio. 

Prepared by the High School, Champaign, 111., and by private tuition. Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1905-06. Group : History and Economics and Politics. 

Izette Taber, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group : History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Elizabeth Tappan, of Baltimore. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr SchooU Baltimore. Holder of Bryn Mawr School 
Scholarship, 1906-08. Group : Greek and Latin. 

Elizabeth Louise Tenney, of Chicago. 

Prepared by the University High School, Chicago. University of Chicago, 
1905-06. Group : History and Economics and Politics. 

Albione Libby Van Schaack, of Chicago. 

Prepared by the Girton School, Winnetka, III. Group : History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Clara Crosby Ware, of Massachusetts. 

Prepared by the High School, Hingham. Mass., and by private tuition. 
Group : History and Economics and Politics. 

Celeste Webb, of Baltimore. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Group : History and 
Economics and Politics. 



104 



Holder of City Scholar- 



Maey Boyde Wesner, of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia, 
ship, 1906-10. Group : Latin and German. 

Alice Whittemore, of Michigan. 

Prepared by St. Timothy's School, Catonsville, Md., and by private tuition. 
Group : Mathematics and Physics. 

Florence Lenore Wilbur, of New Jersey. 

Prepared by the High School, Asbury Park, N. J. Group : History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Marion Kirk Wildman, of Pennsylvania. 

Prepared by the High School, Norristown, by the Baldwin School, Bryn 
Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. Group : German and Spanish. 

Mary Dorothy Whitall Worthington, of New York City. 

Prepared by the High School, Kensington, London, England. Group : Chem- 
istry and Biology. 



IV. 

College Preachers for the Year 1909-10. 

October 3rd. Professor George A. Barton, Ph.D., of Bryn Mawr 

College. 

October 10th. The Rev. George A. Johnston Ross, M.A., Minister 

of the Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church. 

October 17th. The Rev. William Wallace Fenn, D.D., Dean of 

the Divinity School, Harvard University, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

October 24th. The Rev. Julius A. Bewer, Ph.D., Professor of 

Hebrew and Old Testament Interpretation in 
Union Theological Seminary. 

October 31st. The Rev. Charles R. Erdman, D.D., Professor of 

Practical Theology in Princeton Theological Sem- 
inary. 

November 7th. The Rev. David McConnell Steele, D.D., Rector of 
St. Luke's Epiphany Church, Philadelphia. 

November 21st. The Rev. Henry Lubeck, LL.D., D.C.L., Rector of 
the Church of Zion and St. Timothy, New York 
City. 

December 5th. The Rev. Hugh Black, M.A., Jesup Graduate Pro- 
fessor of Practical Theology in Union Theolog- 
ical Seminary. 

December 12th. Mr. Charles Johnston, of New York City. 

December 19th. The Rev. David McConnell Steele, D.D., Rector 
of St. Luke's Epiphany Church, Philadelphia. 

January 9th. The Rt. Rev. William Neilson McVickar, D.D., 

S.T.D., Bishop of Rhode Island. 

January 16th. Professor Rufus M. Jones, Ph.D., of Haverford 
College. 

January 23rd. The Rev. Frank C. Putnam, D.D., Pastor of the 
Wayne Presbyterian Church, Wayne, Pa. 

February 6th. The Rt. Rev. William Lawrence, D.D., LL.D., 
Bishop of Massachusetts. 

105 



106 



February 13th. The Rev. Oliver Huckel, D.D., Pastor of the As- 
sociate Congregational Church of Baltimore, Md. 

February 20th. The Rev. Stewart Means, D.D., Rector of St. 
John's Church, New Haven, Conn. 

February 27th. The Rev. Lemuel Henry Wells, D.D., Missionary 
Bishop of Spokane, Wash. 

March 6th. The Rev. William Herbert Perry Faunce, D.D., 

LL.D., President of Brown University. 

March 13th. The Rev. Anson Phelps Stokes, Jr., A.M., Secre- 

tary of Tale University. 

March 20th. The Rev. John Douglas Adam, D.D., Pastor of the 

First Presbyterian Church of East Orange, N. J. 

April 3rd. The Rev. Anna Howard Shaw of Moylan, Pa. 

April 10th. Dr. Joseph Wilson Cochran, Secretary of the 

Board of Education of the Presbyterian Church. 

April 17th. Mr. Robert Elliott Speer, Secretary of the Pres- 

byterian Board of Foreign Missions. 

April 24th. The Rev. John Balcom Shaw, D.D., Pastor of the 

Second Presbyterian Church of Chicago. 

May 1st. The Rev. H. Roswell Bates, D.D., Minister of the 

Spring Street Presbyterian Mission, New York 
City. 

May 8th. The Rev. William Mansfield Groton, D.D., Dean 

of the Divinity School, Philadelphia. 

May 15th. The Rev. Arthur Rogers, D.D., Rector of Trinity 

Church, West Chester, Pa. 

May 22nd. The Rev. Cornelius S. Woelfkin, D.D., Professor 

of Homiletics in Rochester Theological Seminary. 

May 29th. Baccalaureate Sermon. The Rev. George A. 

Johnston Ross, M.A., Minister of the Bryn 
Mawr Presbyterian Church. 



V. 



Addresses given during the Year 1909-10. 

Commencement Address: 

June 2nd. The President of the United States, "Women's 

College Education." 



Founder's Lecture . 
April 6th. 



College Lectures. 
November 19th. 



December 4th. 



March 5th. 



April 8th. 



April 15th. 



April 16th. 



Professor J. Rendell Harris, Honorary Fellow of 
Clare College, Cambridge, "William Penn and 
the Gentile Divinity." 

Mr. C. Leonard Wooixey, of the University of Ox- 
ford, "Results of the Third Eckley B. Coxe Ex- 
pedition to Nubia. Excavations at Haifa." 

Mrs. Marion Craig-Wentworth, of Boston, read- 
ing of Olive Schreiner's "Dream" and second act 
of Elizabeth Robins's "Votes for Women." 

Mr. Charles Johnston, formerly of the Bengal 
Civil Service, "Is Kipling's India the Real 
India?" 

Professor Albert Schinz, "The Place of Rostand 
in Contemporary Drama ; Chantecler." Lecture 
delivered in French. 

Dr. George Walter Prothero, Honorary Fellow of 
King's College, Cambridge, Editor of the Quar- 
terly Review, "The Present Condition of English 
Politics." 

President Joseph Swain and Professor W. I. 
Hull, of Swarthmore College, "Peace and Arbi- 
tration and the Hague Conferences." 



Before the Christian Union: 

November 14th. Miss Constance M. K. Applebee. 

April 30th & 31st. Week End Conference. The Rev. Richard Roberts. 
M.A., of England. Miss Helena Dudley, Head- 
worker of the Boston College Settlement. 

Before the College Equal Suffrage Chapter: 

February 18th. Mrs. Donald Russell Hooker, "How Women Can 
Best Fulfil Their Duties." 

107 



108 

April 22nd. Professor Florence Keys, Associate Professor of 

English Literature at Vassar College, "Women's 
Suffrage." 

Before the College Settlement Association: 

February 5th. Miss Geraldine Gordon, Organising Secretary of 
College Settlement Associations. 

Before the Consumers' League: 

February 4th. Dr. J. Madison Taylor, member of the Society for 

the Prevention of Infant Mortality, "Purposes 

of the Society." 

Before the English Club: 

April 30th. Mr. Arthur Lionel Smith, Junior Dean of Balliol 

College and Inter-Collegiate Lecturer in History, 
LTuiversity of Oxford, "History and Citizenship ; 
a Forecast." 

Before the Graduate Club: 

November 18th. President M. Carey Thomas, "The Ideal College." 

December 6th. Dr. Josiah H. Penniman, of the University of 
Pennsylvania, "Culture and Civic Obligation." 

March 11th. Professor Herbert "Weir Smyth, of Harvard Uni- 

versity, "Some Aspects of Romanticism in 
Greek Literature." 

April 29th. Professor Arthur Leslie Wheeler, "Some Plautus 

Problems." 

Before the Law Club: 

November 6th. Dean Clarence D. Ashley, of New York Univer- 
sity, "The Iufluence of Reason." 

Before the League for the Service of Christ: 
October 17th. Dr. Talcott Williams. 

December 5th. Mr. Lawson Chambers, Secretary of the Y. M. 
C. A.. Turkey in Asia. 

Before the Philosophical Club: 

December 11th. Dr. Stanton Coit, Chairman of the West London 
Ethical Society, "Eugenics." 

April 2nd. Professor Charles Montague Bakewell, of Yale 

University, "Idealism and Romanticism." 

Before the Science Club: 

December 18th. Director Samuel Wesley Stratton, Director of 

the National Bureau of Standards, "National 

Standards of Measurement." 



109 



April 8th. Professor Leo Loeb, Assistant Professor of Ex- 

perimental Pathology, University of Pennsyl- 
vania, "Cancer." 



November 19th 
December 10th. 
January 15th. 
February 11th. 
February 26th. 

March 19th. 



ENTERTAINMENTS. 

Five Expositions of Classical and Modern Music 
by Mr. Arthur Whiting, of New York. 

Concert by Mr. Perley Dunn Aldrich, of Philadel- 
phia, for the benefit of the Music Fund. 
Glee Club Concert. 



For the Benefit of the Academic Endowment Fund: 

February 12th. Performance of "The Amazons," by the Class of 

1908. 
May 7th. May Day Games and Revels. 

May 14th. Performance of "When Knighthood Was in Favor," 

by the Class of 1909. 



VI. 

Gifts Received by the College During the Year 1909-10. 

The lists of donors to the Endowment Fund and to the 
Gymnasium Fund will he found in Appendices XII and 
XIII. 

Our sincere gratitude is due for the following gifts which 
have been received during the past year, in addition to gifts 
of special books to the library which are enumerated and 
acknowledged in the report of the librarian : 

From the Alumnae Association of the Girls' High and 
Normal School, of. Philadelphia, for the L. C. B. Saul 
Memorial Scholarship, $100. 

From the Athletic Association for improvements in the 
gymnasium, $322.14. 

From Mr. William P. Bancroft for a special scholarship 
in Semitic Languages, $200. 

From the Board of Education of the City of Philadel- 
phia for City Scholarships, $1,400. 

From the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md., for Bryn 
Mawr School Scholarships, $1,485. 

From the Class of 1903, for an electric clock in the ' 
Reading Room of the Library and connections with other 
clocks, $1,000. 

From the Class of 1910, for Sun Dial in memory of 
Clara Justine McKenney, $65.14. 

From the Class of 1910, for books in memory, of Frances 
Appleton Jackson, $83.25. 

From Miss Mary E. Garrett, for fellowships and grad- 
uate scholarships, $6,050 ; for competitive entrance scholar- 
ships, $2,400 ; for art and archaeology $400 ; for publication 
of college monographs, $121.03 ; for the department of phys- 
ical chemistry, $138.36; for lectures, $146.85; for library 
book plate, $169.64; for decoration account $341.58; for 
plans for planting grounds, $57.80 ; for course in Italian art, 
$250 ; for books on Italian literature, $30 ; on non-dramatic 

110 



Ill 

literature, $50 ; on Victor Hugo, $75 ; on English Drama, 
$20 ; on Modern English Literature, $75 ; for cataloguing, 
$25.20 ; for hygiene, $8.03 ; for reference books for the Presi- 
dent's office, $16.36; for annual subscription to the Woman's 
Table at Naples, $50 ; for books for halls of residence, $19.32. 

From Mr. George W. Kendrick, Jr., for Minnie Mur- 
doch Kendrick Memorial Scholarship, $200. 

From Miss Phoebe Cushing Emitting, towards a non-resi- 
dent fellowship in English, $325. 

From Mrs. Charles Roberts, for subscription to the 
American School of Oriental Research in Palestine, $100. 

From the Reverend Anna Howard Shaw and Miss Lucy 
E. Anthony, to found the Susan B. Anthony Memorial Grad- 
uate Scholarship in Political Theory, $5,000. 

From. Mr. Justus C. Strawbridge, towards salary of 
superintendent of grounds, $200. 

From the Students' Building Committee, for improve- 
ments in Cartref, $14.51. 

From Mrs. Sarah M. T. Thomas and Mr. Charles S. 
Taylor, life-size oil painting of Doctor Joseph W. Taylor, 
the founder of the College, by Mr. Paul K. M. Thomas. 

From the Undergraduate Association, for books in mem- 
ory of Professor J. Edmund Wright, $16. 

From Mr. Samuel M. Vauclain, two framed photographs 
of Baldwin locomotives. 

From Miss Cynthia Maria Wesson, for tiling the swim- 
ming pool and improving the heating plant in the gymnasium, 
$7,293.66. 

From Miss Dorothy S. Wolff for a scholarship, $250. 

From an anonymous donor, for books for the Spanish 
department, $100. 



VII. 

Titles of Scientific Publications of the Faculty Which 
Appeared in the Year 1909-10. 

Dr. James Barnes, 

"Note on the Calcium Bands at X 6382 and X 6389." 
Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 31, pp. 175-177, 1910. 

Dr. George A. Barton, 

"The Haverford Library Collection of Cuneiform Tab- 
lets or Documents from the Temple Archives of Telloh, Part 
II. Philadelphia, the John C. Winston Co., London, Head- 
ley Brothers, 1909. Folio, pp. 36 ; pi. 50 + ii. 

"Asceticism, Semitic and Egyptian," in Hastings' Ency- 
clopedia of Religion and Ethics, Vol. II, Edinburgh and 
New York, 1909, pp. 110, 111. 

"Beelzebub." Ibid., pp. 298, 299. 

"Belial." Ibid., pp. 458, 459. 

"Blest, Abode of, Semitic." Ibid., pp. 704-706. 

"Abraham and Archaeology." Journal of Biblical Lit- 
erature, Boston, Vol. XXVIII, pp. 152-168. 

"Patriarchal Names in Babylonian Documents." Amer- 
ican Friend, Philadelphia, Vol. XVII, 132, 133. 

"Hilprecht's New Deluge Tablet." Public Ledger, Phil- 
adelphia, April 3, 1910, p. 2. (A part of this article was 
quoted in the Literary Digest of April 16, 1910, p. 960.) 

"Another View of Hilprecht's Deluge Tablet." Exposi- 
tory Times, Edinburgh, Vol. XXI, August, 1910, pp. 504- 
507. 

"The Christian Message in the Johannine Writings." 
Friends' Quarterly Examiner, London, Vol. XLIII, October, 
1909, pp. ,456-470. 

"The Christian Message in the Eastern Church." Ibid., 
Vol. XLIV, pp. 71-88, January, 1910. 

"The Christian Message in the Western Church." Ibid., 
April, 1910, pp. 177-194. 

112 



113 

"The Christian Message According to the Early 
Friends." Ibid., July, 1910, pp. 305-323. 

"President Sharpless, a Character Sketch." The Ilaver- 
fordian, Vol. XXXI, No. 1, pp. 7, 8. 

Book Reviews : 

Dhorme's "Les livres Samuel" in Bibliotheca Sacra. 
Oberlin, Ohio, Vol. LXXX, January, 1910, p. 1G0. 

"The Babylonian Expedition of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, Series A: Cuneiform Inscriptions." Edited by 
H. V. Hilprecht, Vol. VI, Part 2. 

"Babylonian Legal and Business Documents from the 
Time of the First Dynasty of Babylon, Chiefly from Nippur." 
By Arno Poebel. Ibid., pp. 170, 171. 

Clay's "Amurru, the Home of the Northern Semites." 
Ibid., pp. 171-175. 

"Biblical Ideas of Atonement, their History and Sig- 
nificance." By E. D. Burton, J. M. P. Smith and G. B. 
Smith. Biblical World, Chicago, Vol. XXXV, pp. 140-142. 

Dr. Florence Bascom, 

"Geologic Atlas of the United States, Mercersburg- 
Chambersburg Folio," No. 170. Elephant folio, p. 3, United 
States Geological Survey, 1909. 

Mr. H. Bateman, 

"The Reflection of Light at an Ideal Plane Mirror 
Moving with a Uniform Velocity of Translation." Philo- 
sophical Magazine, December, 1909, pp. 890-895. Correc- 
tion. Ibid., May, 1910. 

"The Determination of Solutions of the Equation of 
Wave Motion Involving an Arbitrary Function of Three 
Variables which Satisfies a Partial Differential Equation." 
Cambridge Philosophical Transactions, Vol. XXI, No. 10, 
pp. 257-280, January 28, 1910. 

"The Transformation of the Electrodynamical Equa- 
tions." Proceedings of the Lo?idon Mathematical Society. 
Series 2, Vol. 8, Part 3, pp. 223-264, March, 1910. 



114 



"Kummer's Quartic Surface as a "Wave Surface." Ibid., 
July, 1910, pp. 375-382. 

"The Transformations of Co-ordinates which can be 
used to Transform one Physical Problem into Another." 
Ibid., pp. 469-488, September-October, 1910. 

"Notes on Integral Equations. Note IV. The Expan- 
sion Theorems and the Integral Equation of the Eirst Kind. 
Messenger of Mathematics. New Series, No. 465, pp. 129- 
135, January, 1910. 

"Note V. Integral Equations with Variable Limits." 
Ibid., No. 467, pp. 173-178, March, 1910. 

"Note VI. The Homogeneous Integral Equation of the 
Eirst Kind." Ibid., pp. 182-191, April, 1910. 

"The Linear Difference Equation of the Third Order 
and a Generalisation of a Continued Fraction." Quarterly 
Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics, No. 164, pp. 
302-308, July, 1910. 

"The Solution of a System of Differential Equations 
Occurring in the Theory of Radio-active Transformations." 
Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, pp. 423- 
427, February, 1910. 

"The Solution of the Integral Equation Connecting the 
Velocity of Propagation of an Earthquake Wave in the Inte- 
rior of the Earth with the Time which the Disturbance Takes 
to Travel to Different Stations on the Earth's Surface." 
Philosophical Magazine, pp. 576-587, April, 1910. Physv- 
halische Zeitschrift, pp. 96-99, February, 1910. 

"Note to a paper by Prof. Rutherford and Dr. Geiger 
on The Probability Variations in the Distribution of a 
Particles." Philosophical Magazine, pp. 704-707, October, 
1910. 

"The Physical Aspect of Time." Memoirs of the Man- 
chester Literary and Philosophical Society, Vol. 54, No. 14, 
pp. 1-13, June 15, 1910. 

"The Relation Between Electromagnetism and Geom- 
etry." Philosophical Magazine, pp. 623-628, October, 1910. 

"A System of Circles Derived from a Cubic Space Curve 
and the Properties of a Certain Configuration of Fifteen 



115 

Lines." Messenger of Mathematics, Vol. XL, Xo. 474, pp. 
81-87, October, 1910. 

"Elementary Systems of Electrons." Physikalische 
Zeitschrift, pp. 318-320, April, 1910. 

Reviews of J. Horn's "Einfuhrung in die Theorie der 
partiellen Differentialgleichungen," and of A. Wangerin's 
"Theorie des Potentials." Mathematical Gazette, p. 311, 
July, 1910. 

Dr. Carleton Fairchild Brown, 

"A Study of the Miracle of Our Lady told by Chaucer's 
Prioress." Chaucer Society Publications, Second Series, Xo. 
45, 1910, pp. 141 -\- x, with a frontispiece showing a fac- 
simile of Lambeth MS. 479, fol. 186 b -187. 

"The Vernon 'Disputisouii Bytwene a Cristenemon and 
a Jew.' " Modem Language Notes, Vol. XXV, pp. 141-144, 
May, 1910. 

Dr. Frederick Hutton Getman, 

"Introduction to Physical Science," pp. 257, 12mo. 
John Wiley & Sons, Xew York City, X. Y., 1909. 

"A Study of the Surface Tensions of Some Unsat- 
urated Organic Compounds." American Chemical Journal, 
Vol. XLIV, Xo, 2, pp. 145-158, 4 pi., August, 1910. 

Dr. Paul Leland Hawortli, 

"Mayor Johnson of Cleveland." The Outlook, Vol. 93, 
pp. 469-474. Magazine number, Xovember, 1909. 

"The Lunge of French River." Outing, Vol. 56, pp. 
18-27, April, 1910. 

"Thomas Jefferson, Poet." The Bookman, Vol. 31, pp. 
647-650, one fac-simile, August, 1910. 

"The History of the United States and Its People." 
Vol. VII r pp. 420 -J- xxviii, over 200 maps. Quarto. Cleve- 
land, Ohio, 1910. 

Dr. William Bashford Huff, 

"Demonstrations with the Musical Arc." Science, pp. 
688-690. Xovember 12, 1909. 



116 

Typical Cases of Secondary Radiation Excited by 
Uranium — X. Physical Review, pp. 482-401, April, 1910. 

Miss Georgiana Goddard King, 

Xnmerous book reviews in North American Revieu\ 

Articles in Harper's Weekly. 

Miss Abby Kirk, 

''First Latin Book," by Abby Kirk and Emily Louisa 
Bull, pp. 254, small 8vo. Press of J. B. Lippincott Com- 
pany, Philadelphia, 1910. 

Dr. Agathe Lasch, 

"Geschichte der Schriftsprache in Berlin bis zur Mitte 
des 16. Jahrhunderts," pp. 350, 8vo. Fr. Wilhelm Ruhfus, 
Dortmund, 1910. 

Dr. James H. Leuba, 

"Eu&apia Palladina; a Critical Consideration of the 
Medium's Most Striking Performances." Putnam's Mag- 
azine, pp. 407-415, January, 1910. 

Dr. M. Phillips Mason, 

Review of Watson's ''The Philosophy, of Kant Ex- 
plained." Journal of Philosophy , Psychology and Scientific 
Methods, pp. 665-667, 2v T ov. 25, 1909. 

Dr. Marion Parris, 

"College Women in ISTon-Teaching Professions." Publi- 
cations of Association of Collegiate Alumnae, pp. 61-79, April, 
1910. 

"The College Graduate and the ISTon-Teaching Profes- 
sions." Bryn Mawr Alumnce Quarterly, pp. 10-18, April, 
1910. 

"Women in the Civil Service" in "Vocations for the 
Trained Woman." Publication of Woman's Educational and 
Industrial Union, pp. 4-8, Boston, 1910. 

Dr. Chester Albert Reeds, 

"A Report on the Geology and Mineral Resources of the 
Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma," Bulletin No. 3, OJcla- 



117 



faoma Geological Survey, pp. 69, pi. 24, figs. 10. maps 2, 
8vo., 1910. 

Dr. Albert Schinz, 

"Notes sur le vocabulaire de Maupassant et cle M-eri- 
mee." Revue des Langues Romanes, Vol. LII, pp. 504-531, 
May to December, 1909. 

"Jean Jacques Rousseau a Forerunner of Modern Prag- 
matism." Reprint with additions from The Monist, October, 
1909, pp. 38. The Open Court Publishing Company, Chicago. 

"La 'Profession de foi du Vicaire Savoyard' et le livre 
'De FEsprit.' ' Revue oVHistoire liUeraire de la France, pp. 
225-261, April to June, 1900. 

Various book reviews in various periodicals. 

Dr. Nettie Maria Stevens, 

"A Note on Reduction in the Maturation of Male Eggs 
in Aphis." Biological Bulletin, Vol. XVIII, No. 2, pp. 
72-75, January, 1910. 

"An Unequal Pair of Heteroehromosomes in Forficula." 
Journal of Experimental Zoology, Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 227-241, 
three plates, March, 1910. 

"The Chromosomes in the Germ-cells of Culex." Ibid., 
Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 207-225, four plates, 8vo, March, 1910. 

"The Chromosomes and Conjugation in Boveria subcylin- 
drica, var. concharum." Archiv fin 1 Protistenkunde. Vol. 20, 
No. 2, pp. 126-131, 1910. 

"Regeneration in Antennularia." Arch. f. Entwicke- 
Iwngsmech. d. Organismen, Vol. XXX (Fest-Band fur 
Prof. Roux), Parti, pp. 1-7, June, 1910. 

"Further Studies on Reproduction in Sagitta." Jour- 
nal of Morphology, Vol. 21, No. 2, pp. 279-319, eight plates, 
July, 1910. 

Seven brief reviews of biological papers in Zentralblatt 
fur Allgemeine und Experimentelle Biologie, April to Octo- 
ber, 1910, pp. 2V 2 . 

Dr. Alfred Horatio Upham, 

"The Schooling of Grid. McNutt." American College, 
pp. 209-220, December, 1909. 



118 

Dr. Joseph W. Warren, 

Numerous book reviews and notes in The Nation. 

Dr. Arthur Leslie Wheeler, 

"Propertius as Preceptor Amoris." Classical Philology, 
Vol. V, pp. 28-40, 1910. 

"Erotic Teaching in Roman Elegy and the Greek 
Sources. Part I." Ibid., pp. 440-450, 1910. 

Dr. Charles Clarence Williamson, 

"An Historical Sketch of the Finances of Cleveland," 
forming Chapter XXIV, Vol. I, pp. 233-258 of "A History 
of Cleveland," 3 vols., large 8vo. S. J. Clarke, Chicago, 1910. 

Review of Graham Wallas, "Human Nature in Poli- 
tics," London, 1908. Political Science Quarterly, pp. 696- 
701, December, 1909. 

Review of Morris Hillquit, "Socialism in Theory and 
Practice," New York, 1909. Economic Bulletin, pp. 59-61, 
March, 1910. 

Review of Hobson, John A., "The Crisis of Liberalism : 
New Issues of Democracy." London, 1909. American Polit- 
ical Science Review, pp. 448-450, August, 1910. 

Dr. Wilmer Cave Wright, 

Various reviews in The Nation and in Classical Philol- 
ogy- 



VIII. 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 

1909-10. 



Department 


Course 


Instructor 


Hours 

weekly 


No. in Class 


1st 
Sem. 


2nd 
Sem. 






Dr. Kent 

Miss Kirk 
Dr. Sanders 

Dr. Stone 
Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders 

Dr. Stone 

Dr. Sanders 

Dr. Stone 

Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders 

Dr. Wright 
Dr. Stone 

Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Wright 

Dr. Wheeler 

Dr. Frank 
Dr. Wheeler 

Dr. Frank 
Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Frank 

Dr. Wheeler 

Dr. Frank 

Dr. Wheeler 

and Dr. Frank 

Miss Donnelly 
Mr. King 

Miss Fullerton 

Dr. Crandall 

Miss King 

Dr. Loshe 

Miss Nichols 


... 5... 

... 3... 

... 2... 
... 2... 
... 2... 
... 1... 
... 1... 

... 2... 

... r... 

... 2... 
... 1... 
... 1... 
... 1... 

... 3... 

... 2... 
... 2... 

... 2... 
... 3... 

... 3... 
... 2... 
... 3... 
... 3... 

... 2... 
... 2... 
... 3... 
... 3... 

... 2... 
... 1... 

... 3... 
... 2... 

1* fort- 
nightly 

... 3... 
}■• 

... 1*.. 


... 9... 

'.'.'.' 8.'.'. 

... 7... 

... 7... 

... 6... 
... 4... 
... 5... 

... 4... 

... 7... 

...77... 

.'"7L.'! 
...22... 

...32... 

... 7... 

...11... 

... 8... 

...94... 
..106... 

...99... 


... 1... 




Elementary Greek, Grammar, 

Composition and Reading. . 

Plato and Composition.minor. 

Euripides and Composition, 


... 8... 
... 8... 






... 8... 












... 6... 












... 6... 




History of Greek Literature, 


... 6 .. 






... 5... 




Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Greek Orators . . . 


'.'.'.' 5.'.'. 

.. 4 . 




Seminary in the Homeric 


... 5 . 




Livy and Composition, minor. 
Cicero and Composition, 


. 67 . 






68 










History of Latin Literature, 


...22... 
29 




Roman Satire, post-major. . . . 

Lucretius, post-major 

Cicero and Caesar, post-major. 
Roman History, post-major . . 
Catullus and Horace, post- 


...12... 
3 




Advanced Latin Prose Cbm- 






Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Latin Comedy. . . 

Seminary in Roman History.. 


...12... 




History of English_ Literature, 

Elocution", First Year, required 
English Composition, First 


... 8... 

...91... 
105... 






...95.. 



119 



120 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1909-10. — Continued. 





Course 


Instructor 


Hours 
weekly 


No. in Class 




1st 
Sem. 


2nd 

Sem. 




History of English Literature, 
Elocution, Second Year, re- 
English Composition, Second 

English Critics of the Nine- 
teenth Century, minor 

Middle English Poetry, minor 


Miss Donnelly 

Mr. King 

MissFullerton 

Dr. Crandall 

Miss King 

Dr. Loshe 

Miss Nichols 

Dr. Clark 
Dr. Hatcher 
Dr. Brown 

;; 


... 3... 
... .*.. 

... 1*.. 

... 3... 
... 2... 
... 2... 
... 3... 
... 3... 


...75... 
...73... 

...73... 

...24... 
...23... 
... 5... 
... 6... 

... 7... 
...11... 
... 6... 

... 3... 

...15... 

...15... 

... 2... 
... 7... 
... 3... 
... 5... 

... 9... 
... 7... 

...10... 
...31... 

...19... 

... 6... 
... 9... 
... 6... 

... 4... 


...76... 
...72... 

...73... 

...19... 
...23... 
... 3... 

. .. 6. . 




Classical and Romantic Prose, 


Dr. Clark ... 3... 

... 2... 

Dr Hatcher ... 2 . . 


... 8.. 




Elizabethan Non-dramatic Lit- 


...10 . 

... 7.. 

.. . 4. .. 




Descriptive and Narrative 


Miss Fullerton 
Mr. King 

Dr. Clark 
Dr. Brown 

Dr. Hatcher 

Dr. Clark 

Miss Donnelly 

Dr. Brown and 

Dr. Hatcher 

Miss Chamber- 
lin 

Dr. .lessen 

Dr. Weyhe 

Dr. Jessen 

Dr. Weyhe 

Miss Chamber- 
lin 


... 2... 
... 1... 

... 3... 
... 3... 
... 2... 
... 3... 

... 1... 

... 1*.. 

fort- 
nightly 

... 5... 
... 3... 

... 3... 

... 2... 

... 2... 

... 3... 
... 1... 
... 1... 

2 


...15... 




Reading of Shakespeare, elec- 


...13... 




Graduate Courses 

Seminary in English Litera- 


... 3. .. 




Seminary in Middle English.. . 

Cvnewulf and Caedmon 

Seminary in Shakespeare 

Dramatic Theory and Tech- 


... 7... 
... 3... 
... 5... 

8 .. 










Elementary German, Gram- 
Critical Reading and Gram- 
mar and Composition, 


... 7.. 
... 8... 




Critical Reading and Gram- 
mar and Composition, 


...28 




History of German Literature, 






History of German Literature, 


...17... 




History of German Literature 
and Selected Reading, major 

Faust (2nd part), major 

Prose Composition, major. . . . 

Advanced German Composi- 
tion and Reading of Modern 


... 7... 
... 8... 
... 6... 

... 2... 



121 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1909-10. — Continued. 



Department 



Teutonic 
Philology. 



French . 



Course 



Italian. 



Spanish 



Romance 

Languages . 



German Literature from 1850 
to the present time and 
Critical Reading, post- 
major 

Middle High German, post- 
major 

Graduate Courses 
Seminary in German Litera- 
ture 

German Journal Club 

Teutonic Seminary 

Middle High German, first 

year 

Middle High German, second 

year 

Old Norse 

Gothic 

Elementary French, Grammar 
and Translation. 

History of French Literature 
and Collateral Reading, 
minor 

French Critical Readings and 
Composition, minor 

History of French Literature 
and Collateral Reading, 
major 

French Critical Readings and 
Composition, major 

French Novel, post-major 

The Short Story, post-major. . 

Teacher's Course in Advanced 
French, post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Victor Hugo .... 

Old French Philology 

Italian, minor 

Italian Classics in English 
Translations, minor 

Graduate Courses 
Advanced Italian 

Spanish, minor 

Spanish, Literary History, 
Composition _ and Critical 
Reading, major 

Advanced Spanish, po*t- 
major 

Graduate Courses 

Spanish, first year 

Classical Plays 

Romance Languages, Journal 
Club 



Instructor 


Hours 
weekly 


No. lis 


Class 


1st 
Sem. 


2nd 
Sem. 


Dr. Jessen 


... 3... 


... 6... 


... 5... 


Dr. Weyhe 


... 1... 


... 1... 


... 1... 


Dr. Jessen 

Dr. Jessen and 

Dr. Weyhe 


... 2... 
... *... 


... 7... 
....6... 


... 7... 
... 8... 


Dr. Weyhe 


... 2... 


... 3... 


... 4... 


" 




... 3... 


... 3... 


'•'• 


... 1... 
..•2 
... 2... 


... 3... 
... 1... 
... 3... 


... 3... 
... 1.. . 
... 5... 


Dr. Nicolay 

and 

Miss M.S. King 


... 5... 


... 5... 


... 4... 


Mr. Blossom 




...36... 




Dr. Schinz 


... 2... 


...40... 


...38... 


" 




...11... 




Mr. Blossom 
Dr. Schinz 


... 2... 
... 3... 
... 1... 


...12... 
... 5... 
... 6... 


...11... 
... 4... 

... 8... 


Mr. Blossom 


... 1... 


... 6... 


... 5... 


Dr. Schinz 
Dr. Holbrook 






... 2... 
... 3... 




" 


... 3... 


...18... 


...15... 


" 




... 6... 




» 


... 2... 


... 1... 


... 1... 


Dr. DeHaan 


... 5... 


...10... 


...10... 


" 


...•5... 


... 2... 


... 2... 


" 


... 1... 


... 1... 


... 1... 


" 


... 3... 
... 1... 


... 2... 
... 1... 


2 .. 


Dr. DeHaan 

Dr. Schinz 

Dr. Holbrook 

Mr. Blossom 


... 11.. 

fort- 
nightly 


... 5... 


... 4... 



122 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1909-10. — Continued. 



Department 


Course 


Instructor 


Hours 
weekly 


No. in 


Class 


1st 
Sem. 


2nd 
Sem. 


Semitic Lan- 
guages and 


New Testament Biography, 


Dr. Barton 

Miss Downing 

Dr. Allison 
Dr. Smith 

Dr. Allison 

Dr. Smith 
Dr. Allison 

Dr. Parris 
Dr. Williamson 

Dr. Parris 

Dr. Williamson 

Dr. Parris 
Dr. Williamson 
and Dr. Parris 

Dr. deLaguna 

Dr. Leuba 
Dr. deLaguna 

Dr. Mason 

Dr. Leuba 

Dr. Ferree 


... 5... 
... 2... 
... 1... 

... 1... 
... 1... 
... 1... 
... 1... 

... 1... 
... 1... 
... 2... 
... 1... 

... 5... 
... 5... 

... 5... 

... 5... 

... 2... 

... 2... 

... 3... 
... 1... 

... 5... 

... 5... 
... 5... 

... 5... 
... 2... 

... 2... 

... 3... 
... 2... 
... 2... 

fort- 
nightly 

... 3... 
... 2... 
... 3... 

... 3... 

... 2... 

... 2... 


... 7... 
... 5... 
... 6... 

... 1... 
... 2... 
... 2... 
... 2... 

... 2... 
... 1... 
... 2... 
... 1... 

...51... 

...29... 
... 3... 

... 6... 

...67... 

'.'.'.ti'.'.'. 

...13... 
... 4... 

... 1... 
... 1... 
... 2... 

...98... 
...97... 
...14... 

...15... 


...10... 

... 8... 


eratuhe.. . . 


Old Testament Canon, elec- 


... 9... 




Graduate Courses 


... 1... 












... 2... 






... 2... 




Comparative Semitic Gram- 


... 2.. . 






... 1... 






... 1.. 




History of- Europe to the pe- 
riod of the Renaissance, 


... 1... 




History of Europe from the 
Renaissance to the close of 
the religious wars, minor. . . 

History of Europe from the 
Treaty of Westphalia to the 
close of the Napoleonic 


...49... 




History of Europe from the 
Congress of Vienna to the 
Present Time, major 

Reform Period, post-major. . . 

British Imperialism, post-ma- 


...32... 
... 3... 


Economics 


American Constitutional His- 
tory from 1789 to the Pres- 

Seminary in English History. . 

Introduction to Economics, 


...10... 
... 1... 




Introduction to Politics, mi- 


...68... 




History of Economic Thought, 


. !.22 .. 




Theoretical Sociology, post- 


...18... 
... 4... 


Philosopht. . . 


Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Theory of Value 

History of Philosophy, re- 


... 2... 
... 1... 
... 2... 

...94... 




Elementary Ethics, minor. . . . 
Problems in Metaphysics, 


...88... 
...13... 




Psychology of Instinct, Emo- 
Experimental Psychology, 


...11... 









123 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1909-10.— Continued. 



Department 



Education. . 

HlSTORY OP 

Art and 
Classical 
Archae- 
ology .... 



Mathematics- 



Physics . 



Course 



Empiricism and Rationalism, 

major 

Philosophy of Kant, major. . . 
Experimental Psychology, 

major 

Animal Psychology, major.. . . 
Rousseau's Social Philosophy, 

elective . 

Logic, elective 

Types of Metaphysical Theory, 

post-major 



Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Ethics 

Seminary in Psychology 

Systematic Psychology 

Psvchological Laboratory 
Work 



Psychological Journal Club. 
Education, elective 



History of Architecture, elec- 
tive 

Egyptian Art , elective 

ItalianRenaissance Painting, 
elective 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Archaeology 

Archaeological Journal Club. . . 



Trigonometry, Preparatory 
Course 

Analytical Conies and Theory 
of Equations, minor 

Differential and Integral Cal- 
culus , minor 

Advanced Algebra and Trigo- 
nometry, minor 

Differential and Integral Cal- 
culus, Theory of Equations 
and Differential Equations, 
major 

Analytical Geometry, History 
of Mathematics, major 

Graphic Mathematics, elec 
tive 

Applied Mathematics, elec- 
tive 

Modern Analytical Geometry, 
post-major 

Theory of Functions, post 
major 



Graduate Courses 
Theory of Algebraic Inva- 
riants 

Seminary in Geometry. . . . 



Heat, Sound and Properties 
of Matter, minor . . 

Light, Electricity and Magne- 
tism, minor 



Instructor 



Dr. Mason 
Dr. deLaguna 

Dr. Ferree 
Dr. Leuba 

Dr. deLaguna 
Dr. Mason 



Hours 
weekly 



Dr. Leuba and 
Dr. Ferree 

Dr. Leuba and 
Dr. Ferree 
Dr. Leuba 



Dr. Ransom 

Miss King 
Dr. Ransom 

Dr. Ragsdale 

Dr. Scott 

Dr. H. S. Huff 

Dr. Ragsdale 

Mr. Wright 
Dr. Scott 

Mr. Wright 

Dr. Scott 

Mr. Wright 

Dr. Scott 

Dr. Huff 
Dr. Barnes 



Dr. deLaguna ... 3. . 
Dr. Leuba ... 3. . 
Dr. Ferree ... 3. 



..2.. 
.. 1*, 
fort- 
nightly 



No. in Class 



1st 
Sem. 



..17. 



.. 7... 



3... 
2... 
3... 



.20. 



...39.. 
...17.. 



.45.. 
. 5.. 



2... 



.27. 



2nd 
Sem. 



.. 4. 
.. 2. 
,. 5. 



.;<*. 



.. 3. 
.. 5. 



.24. 



124 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1909-10. — Continued. 



Department 


Course 


Instructor 


Hours 
weekly 


No. in Class 


1st 
Sem. 


2nd 

Sem. 




Theory of Light, Mechanics, 


Dr. Huff and 

Dr. Lowater 

Dr. Barnes and 

Dr. Lowater 

Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Huff 

Dr. Barnes and 

Dr. Lowater 

Dr. Huff and 

Dr. Lowater 

Dr. Huff 

Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Huff and 

Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Kohler 

Dr. Getman 

Dr. Kohler and 

Miss Heritage 

Dr. Getman 

and 

Miss Heritage 

Dr. Getman 

Dr. Kohler 

Dr. Getman 

and 
Miss Heritage 
Dr. Kohler and 
Miss Heritage 

Dr. Kohler 

Dr. Getman 

Dr. Kohler and 

Dr. Getman 

Dr. Bascom 
Mr. Reeds 

Dr. Bascom 

Mr. Reeds 

Dr. Bascom 

Mr. Reeds 

Dr. Bascom 
Mr. Reeds 

Dr. Bascom 

Dr. Bascom 

Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Randolph 


... 4... 
... 4... 
... 5... 

5 
... 5... 

... 3... 
... 1... 
... 5... 
... 5... 
5 

... 5... 
... 5... 
... 5... 

... 5... 

... 1... 
... 3... 

... 5... 
... 5... 

... 5... 

... 5... 
... 2... 
... 2... 
... 2... 

... 4... 


...27... 
... 7... 
... 7... 

... 2... 
... 3... 
...20... 

...20... 

'.'.'.' I.'.'. 

... 7... 

... 1... 
... 2... 

...16... 
■■-■■ 


...24... 




Heat, Electricity and Magne- 


... 8... 




Properties of Matter, post- 


... 8... 




Theory of Sound, post-major. 
Graduate Courses 


... 2... 


Chemistry 


Introduction to General Chem- 


... 3... 




Introduction to Organic Chem- 


...17... 




Laboratory Work, minor 

Laboratory Work, minor 

Theoretical Chemistry, major 
Organic Chemistry, major. . . . 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Organic Chem- 


...17... 
'.'.'.' 6.'.'. 

... 6... 
... 1... 




Seminary in Physical Chem- 


... 2... 




Physiography, minor 

Megascopic Petrology, minor. . 
Field Work and Laboratory 


... 4... 
...16... 




Field Work and Laboratory 

Historical Geology, major .... 
Glaciology and Structural 

Geologv, major 

Field Work and Laboratory 


...16... 
... 4... 




Field Work and Laboratory 


... 4... 




Petrography, post-major 

Graduate Course 






...50... 
...50... 


...12... 
... 2... 


Biology 


General Biology, minor 











12: 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1009-10.— Continued. 



Department 


Course 


Instructor 


Hours 
weekly 


No. IN 

1st 

Sem. 


Class 

2nd 

Sem. 


• 


Vertebrates and Embryology. 
Laboratory Work, minor. . . . 

Animal Physiology, major. . . . 

General Zoology, Anatomy, 

Theoretical Biology 

Laboratory Work, major 

Theoretical Biology, elective. 
Comparative Anatomy, post- 


Dr. Tennent 

and 
Dr. Warren 
Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Warren 
and 
Dr. Randolph 
Dr. Warren 
Dr. Tennent 

and 
Dr. Warren 
Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Warren 
and 
Dr. Randolph 
Dr. Tennent 

Dr. Warren 

Dr. Stevens 

Dr. Tennent 

Dr. Warren 

Dr. Stevens 
Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Warren 

and 
Dr. Stevens 


... 5... 

... 5... 
... 5... 

... 5... 

... 5... 

3 to 5 


...50... 
... 1... 

. 1 .. 
... 9... 

... 2... 
.. 2... 

... 5... 

... 3... 

... 3... 
... 1... 

.. 1... 
... 1... 
... 1... 

... 3... 
... 4... 


...45... 
...45... 
... 1... 

... 1... 

... 7... 

2 




Laboratory Work, post-major 
Advanced Physiology, post- 


.. 2... 
5 




Physiological Chemistry, post- 


... 3... 




The _ Nervous System, post- 


. . . 3. . . 




Exp. Morphology, post-major. 

Graduate Courses 

Problems in Embryology .... 

Laboratory Work 

Special Problems of Nutrition. 
Advanced Experimental Mor- 
phology 


... 1.. . 

... 1... 
... 1. . 
... 1... 

... 3... 
... 4 . . 



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XI. 

Resolutions in Memory of Professor J. Edmund Wright, As- 
sociate Professor of Mathematics in Bryn Mawr College. 

Bom, 1878. Died, February. 20, 1910. 

Minute adopted by the Board of Directors of the Trus- 
tees of Bryn Mawr College at a meeting held March 18, 1910 : 

Information was now received of the death, on the 
20th of last month, of J. Edmund Wright, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics, after a brief illness, in the thirty- 
third year of his age, and the seventh year of his work as 
a teacher in Bryn Mawr College. 

The Board of Directors wishes to place upon its records 
its sense of the great loss the College has sustained in his 
death, its recognition of his achievement and promise as a 
student and as a research w r orker in the field of higher math- 
ematics, and its appreciation of his loyal and successful per- 
formance of his duties as a teacher during his association 
with the College. 



Resolutions passed by the Faculty of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege: 

Whereas, our colleague, J. Edmund Wright, M.A., of 
Cambridge University, Associate Professor of Mathematics 
in Bryn Mawr College, has been removed by death : 

Resolved, that we, the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College, 
desire to record our sense of the great loss that we have sus- 
tained in the death of Professor Wright, and our high appre- 
ciation of his intellectual power, of the extraordinary alert- 
ness and vitality of his mind, and of his widely recognised 
ability in research. We desire to record our conviction that 
in the early death of Professor Wright mathematical science 

131 



132 



has sustained a serious loss. Further, we desire to express 
our recognition of his keen interest in all problems of admin- 
istration and of his constant endeavors towards the main- 
tenance of lofty standards. 

Resolved, that a copy of this resolution be sent to Mrs. 
Wright as an expression of profound sympathy. 



Resolutions passed by the Graduate Club of Bryn Mawr 
College : 

Whekeas, in the death of J. Edmund Wright,- Associate 
Professor of Mathematics at Bryn Mawr College, the College 
loses from its ranks one of its best known professors : 

Be it resolved that the Graduate Club of Bryn Mawr 
College herewith express to Mrs. Wright, to the Faculty, and 
to Mr. James Wright and family, its heartfelt sympathy and 
its recognition of the great loss which it shares in common 
with them and the College at large. 

And be it further resolved that the Graduate Club 
leave on record here its cordial appreciation of the work 
of Professor Wright during his residence in our midst. 



Resolutions passed by the Undergraduate Association of 
Bryn Mawr College: 

Whekeas, the death of Prdfessor J. Edmund Wright 
has filled the whole College with a realization of his brilliant 
promise as a scholar, and with a deep sense of grief at his 
loss. And 

Whereas his death has moved especially his students, 
to whom he has endeared himself, and in whom he has in- 
spired an increasing admiration for the transcendent power 
of his mind : 

Resolved, that we, the Undergraduate Association, do 
hereby express to Mrs. Wright and to the Faculty our sym- 



133 

pathy with their sorrow and our gratitude for his unwearied 
and effective service in behalf of the scholarly ideals of this 
college, and be it 

Besolved, that a copy of these resolutions be sent to Mrs. 
Wright, and to the Faculty, and be inserted in the records of 
the Association. 



XII. 



List of Donors to the Endowment Fund. 

Donors of $5,000 or over. 

Mrs. Charles B. Alexander New Yoi-k City. 

The Baldwin Locomotive Works Philadeipnia. 

The Misses Blanchard Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Raynal Cawthorne Bolling New York City. 

Miss Mary C. Burnham Philadelphia. 

Mrs. William Carter Dickerman Mamaroneck, N. Y. 

Mrs. J. Malcolm Foebes Milton, Mass. 

Mr. James J. Higginson New York City. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne MacVeagh Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Dr. John P. Munn New YorK City. 

Mrs. John P. Munn New Yoi-k City. 

Chicago Beyn Mawr Club (Proceeds of Opera) .. Chicago. 

Mr. Justus C. Strawbridge Philadelphia. 

Mr. Frederic H. Strawbridge Philadeipnia. 

Estate of Phoebe Anna Thorne New York City. 

Mrs. George D. Widener Ashhourne, Pa. 

Donors of $2,000 or over out under $5,000. 

Miss Charlotte S. Baker New York City. 

Miss Mary E. Converse Rosemont, Pa. 

Mr. Samuel S. Eveland Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss May Gibson Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Ogden H. Hammond Superior, Wis. 

Mrs. William P. Henszey Wynnewood, Pa. 

Miss Gertrude L. Kemmerer Upper Lehigh, Pa. 

Mrs. Herbert Lyman Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Joseph N. Pew Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mr. George Wendell Phillips North Beverly, Mass. 

Mr. Norman B. Ream New York City. 

Miss Cynthia M. Wesson Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. H. W. Whitney Boston, Mass. 

Donors of $1,000 or over out under $2,000. 

Miss M. S. Ames Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Summerpield Baldwin Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. Laird Bell Chicago. 

Mrs. John Bertram* Salem, Mass. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert L. Clark Philadelphia. 

Mr. Henry H. Collins Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mr. Sabin W. Colton, Jr Philadelphia. 

Mr. Howard Comport Philadelphia. 

Estate of Ruth Anna Cope : . . . Philadelphia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas de Witt Cuyler Philadelphia. 

♦Deceased, 1909. 

134 



135 



Miss Doeis Earle Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Thomas A. Edison Orange, N. J. 

Me. Rudulph Ellis Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mrs. G. R. Emeeton Salem, Mass. 

Mrs. Max Pleischmann New York City. 

A Friend 

Miss Feances Biddle Garrett Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Fanny Hardacee Bridgehampton, L. I. 

Me. George B. Hopkins New York City. 

Mrs. Heebeet M. Howe Philadelphia. 

Me. C. H. Hulbued Chicago. 

Me. A. F. Huston Coatesville, Pa. 

Mrs. Charles Jackson Dover, Mass. 

Mes. Helen Hartley Jenkins New York City. 

Mes. Otto H. Kahn New York City. 

Mrs. David P. Kimball Boston, Mass. 

Mes. Roberts Le BodTillier Wayne, Pa. 

Mr. George H. McFadden ■. Philadelphia. 

Mrs. John Wyckofp Mettler E. Millstone, N. J. 

Mes. S. Haeeison Moeeis Philadelphia. 

Mes. Wistar Morris Overbrook, Pa. 

Mrs. Elizabeth H. North Chicago. 

Miss Ethel Pew Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mr. William Phillips Beverly, Mass. 

Me. Chaeles E. Pugh Overbrook, Pa. 

Me. Samuel Rea Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Maeion Reilly Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Me. Charles J. Rhoads Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mrs. Reginald C. Robbins Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. Thomas Scattergood Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Arthur Hugh Scott Siphook, Hants, England. 

Me. William Ellis Scull Overbrook, Pa. 

Mrs. Samuel R. Shipley Philadelphia. 

Miss Susan G. Shipley * Philadelphia. 

Mr. Horace E. Smith Philadelphia. 

Miss Clara B. Spence New York City. 

Me. Francis Lyndb Stetson New York City. 

Mr. Frank Deming Stout Chicago. 

Mr. Henry Strong Chicago. 

Mr. William H. Taylor New York City. 

Mes. Charlemagne Tower and the Misses Tower Philadelphia. 

Mes. William J. Walkee Albany, N. Y. 

Me. Felix M. Warburg New York City. 

Mr. John I. Waterbury Moorestown, N. J. 

Mr. F. R. Welles Paris, France. 

Mrs. S. K. Wesson Springfield, Mass. 

Me. John M. Whitall Philadelphia. 

Mr. Asa S. Wing Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Anna Woerishoffer , New York City. 

Mr. Alexander C. Wood Cinnaminson, N. J. 

Mr. George Wood Philadelphia. 

Donors of $500 or over hut under $1,000. 

Mr. Samuel L. Allen Moorestown, N. J. 

Anonymous Philadelphia. 

Mrs. A. W. Blake Brookline, Mass. 



136 



Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Brewer Milton, Mass. 

Mrs. Edward Carey Milton, Mass. 

Mr. Lowell Emerson Providence, R. I. 

Miss Etta Herr Lancaster, Pa. 

Mrs. William Gold Hibbard, Jr Chicago. 

Mr. Samuel Horner, Jr Philadelphia. 

Mrs. James Hopwood Jeans Cambridge, England. 

Mr. Francis M. Jencks Baltimore. Md. 

Mr. IT. McB. Johnston . . Chicago. 

Mrs. John Leisenring Kem merer New York City. 

Mrs. Henry P. Kidder Boston, Mass. 

Miss Leslie Knowles Boston, Mass. 

General Charles J. Langdon Elmira, N. Y. 

Mrs. Edward Eugene Loomis Elmira, N. Y. 

Mrs. Norman Macbeth (Proceeds of Plays) Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester S. Marvin Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mr. Richard S. Mason Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Frederick Strong Mosely Boston, Mass. 

Mr. George W. Perkins New York City. 

Miss Isabel M. Peters New York City. 

Mrs. Edward A. Schmidt Radnor, Pa. 

The Misses Shipley Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

The Misses Shipley^s School Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mr. Albert K. Smiley Lake MohonK, N. Y. 

Mrs. Redmond Davis Stephens Chicago. 

Dr. and Mrs. C. Hermon Thomas Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Charles Louis Tiffany New York City. 

Miss Edith Totten Washington, D. C. 

Miss Louise Veltin New York City. 

Mrs. John Howell Westcott* Princeton, N. J. 

Mrs. Anna Dean Wilbur Rosemont, Pa. 

Miss Mary Almira Williams Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mrs. Alan Wood, Jr Philadelphia. 

Donors of $200 or over hut wider $500. 

Mrs. Talbot Aldrich Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. Roger Newton Allen Boston. Mass. 

Anonymous Philadelphia. 

Dr. J. B. Ayer Boston, Mass. 

Mr. C. P. Bowditch Jamaica Plains, Mass. 

Boston Bryn Mawr Club (Proceeds of Chain 

Letter) Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Joel Cadbury Philadelphia. 

Miss Ethel Bird Chase Washington. D. C. 

Mr. Ellis C. Clarke Boston, Mass. 

Miss Alice Eichberg Cincinnati, O. 

Mr. George W. Elkins Philadelphia. 

Mr. G. Farwell Lake Forest, 111. 

Mr. Marshall Field* Chicago. 

Mrs. Gerard Fountain Scarsdaje, N. Y. 

Mrs. Frank Thomson Gucker Philadelphia. 

Mr. J. Campbell Harris Philadelphia. 

Mrs. J. Campbell Harris Philadelphia. 

♦Deceased. 



137 



Mrs. H. H. Houston PhiladelpSia. 

Mrs. Percy Jackson New York City. 

Mrs. William P. Jenks Philadelphia. 

Miss Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Charles Edward Knoblauch New York City. 

Miss Margaretta MacVeagi-i Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Blanche Nevin Churchtown, Ta. 

Mrs. John C. Phillips Beverly, Mass. 

Mrs. James Foster Porter Hubbard Woods, 111. 

Mr. George Rice Pottstown, Pa. 

Mrs. W. H. Schofield Cambridge, Mass. 

Mr. Henry N. Scoville New York City. 

Mrs. Arthur H. Scribner New York City. 

Mrs. Henry Siegel New York City. 

Mr. P. W. Smith Chicago. 

Mrs. John Jewell Smith New York City. 

Mrs. W. M. Smith Staten Island, N. Y. 

Miss Lila Roosevelt Stoughton New York City. 

Mr. C. G. Weld Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Stephen M. Weld Dedham, Mass. 

Miss Mary Lovering Wharton Philadelphia. 

Mr. David E. Williams Philadelphia. 

Mr. Ellis D. Williams Philadelphia. 

Mr. Moses Williams Brookline, Mass. 

Miss Lila M. Wright Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Donors of $100 or over out under $200. 

Mrs. William Baeder Adamson Villa Nova, Pa. 

Miss Maria Hawes Albee Boston, Mass. 

Miss Frances Arnold New York City. 

Mr. Joseph Ashbrook Philadelphia. 

Miss M. Ayer ? . . . Boston, Mass. 

The Baldwin School Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mr. William Hampton Barnes Devon, Pa. 

Mr. E. P. Beebe Boston, Mass. 

Mr. T. Broom Belfield Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. Julia Blackman Nebraska. 

Mrs. L. P. Blake Boston, Mass. 

Miss Louise Bolton-Smith Memphis, Tenn. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Brandon Butler, Pa. 

Mrs. Joseph Brewer Milton, Mass. 

Mr. Louis Brown Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mr. Henry G. Bryant Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Charles Seaton Buell Winnetka, 111. 

Mr. William C. Bullitt Philadelphia. 

Mr George Burnham, Jr Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Phillip Powell Calvert Philadelphia. 

Miss Ethel Cantlin Philadelphia. 

Miss Hannah Thayer Carpenter New York City. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hampton L. Carson Philadelphia. 

Mr. F. W. Cheney South Manchester, Conn. 

Mr. K. D. Cheney South Manchester, Conn. 

Miss M. Cheney South Manchester, Conn. 

Mrs. Charles J. Clarke Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Anna Huidekoper Clarke Boston, Mass. 



138 



Miss Susan G. Clarke Boston, Mass. 

Miss II. Collamoeb Yosemite, Cal. 

Mr. Francis R. Cooley -. Hartford, Conn. 

Me. and Mrs. Francis R. Cope, Jr Philadelphia. 

Miss Emily Redmond Cross New York City. 

Mr. J. R. Cross New York City. 

Miss Hannah Maria Dodd Rehoboth, Del. 

Miss Elinor Dodge Belmont, Mass. 

Mr. C. R. Dudley* Philadelphia. 

Miss Madeleine Edison Orange, N. J. 

Miss Edith Edwards Woonsocket, R. I. 

Mr. Henry Howard Ellison Philadelphia. 

Mrs. W. Endicott, Jr Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Edward L. Farr Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Joseph S. Fay Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Charles Fearon Philadelphia. 

Mr. William Righter Fisher Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Louise Fleischmann New York City. 

Mrs. Albert Rowland Gardner New York City. 

Mrs. Philip Garrett Philadelphia. 

Miss Elise Messenger Gignoux Great Neck, L. I. 

Mrs. Clement A. Griscom Haverford, Pa. 

Mrs. Charles Hacker Philadelphia. 

Mrs. E. D. Halsey Morristown, N. J. 

Mr. Charles C. Harrison, Jr Philadelphia. 

Mr. John C. Haynes* Philadelphia. 

Mr. W. E. Hering Philadelphia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Hinchman Philadelphia. 

Miss Evelyn M. Holliday Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mrs. J. h. Holliday . Indianapolis, Ind. 

Miss Katharine Husted Broadalbin, N. Y. 

Mr. William A. Ingham Philadelphia. 

MR. Felix Isman Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Charles Cabot Jackson Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Robert M. Janney Wynnewood, Pa. 

Mr. Eldridge R. Johnson Merion, Pa. 

Miss E. Jones Boston, Mass. 

Dr. W. W. Keen Philadelphia. 

Mrs. F. R. Kellogg Morristown, N. J. 

Miss Ida Langdon Elmira, N. Y. 

Mrs. Arthur H. Lea Philadelphia. 

Miss Nina Lea Philadelphia. 

Miss Constance Lewis Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mrs. Frank N. Lewis Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mr. John F. Lewis Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Theodore J. Lewis Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Wilfred Lewis Philadelphia. 

Mr. Jacob D. Lit Philadelphia. 

Mr. T. K. Lothrop Boston, Mass. 

Miss Mason Boston, Mass. 

Miss Mary Taylor Mason Philadelphia. 

Miss Rosalind F. Mason Chicago. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. E. McVitty Rosemont, Pa. 

♦Deceased. 



139 



Mrs. R. Mellon New York City. 

Mr. Caleb J. Milne Philadelphia. 

Mrs. C. S. Morgan Baltimore, Md. 

Dr. John H. Musser Philadelphia. 

Mrs. A. Edward Newton Doylesford, Pa. 

Miss Ida H. Ogilvie New York City. 

Dr. John Jones Owen Philadelphia. 

Mr. Calvin Pardee Whitemash, Pa. 

Dr. and Mrs. W. A. Patton Wayne, Pa. 

Miss M. H. Perkins Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. J. Parker Pray Passaic, N. J. 

Mrs. Charles Roberts Haverford, Pa. 

Miss Frances A. Roberts Philadelphia. 

Miss Fannie Rosengarten Philadelphia. 

Mr. Joseph G. Rosengarten Philadelphia. 

The Rev. G. A. Johnston Ross Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Marion Russell Boston, Mass. 

Miss Caroline Rutz-Rees . Greenwich, Conn. 

Miss Helen M. Saunders Yonkers, N. Y. 

Mr. J. Henry Scattergood Philadelphia. 

Mr. Philip M. Shaepless West Chester, Pa. 

Mr. Thomas Sherwin Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Miss Agnes M. Sinclair Cedar Rapids, la. 

Miss Julia Pratt Smith New York City. 

Mrs. James Spear Philadelphia. 

Mrs. John Thayer Boston, Mass. 

Miss Genevieve Thompson Portland, Ore. 

Mr. M. Hampton Todd Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Orpha W. Twitchell Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss C. F. Wagner , Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Joseph Warren Boston, Mass. 

Mr. James V. Watson Philadelphia. 

Mr. H. H. Westinghouse New York City. 

Mr. R. R. Whitehead Trenton, N. J. 

Miss L. C. Whitney Brookline, Mass. 

Miss Helen E. Williams Philadelphia. 

Mrs. R. H. Wilmaeth Chicago. 

Miss Philena Clark Winslow Portland, Me. 

Miss Mary P. Winsor Boston, Mass. 

Mr. John C. Winston Philadelphia. 

Mrs. George Woodward Philadelphia. 

Miss Wright^s School Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Anna Yarnall Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Maynard K. Yoakum Porto Rico, W. I. 

The Rev. E. J. Young Waltham, Mass. 

Donors of $50 or over out under $100. 

Mrs. Clifford Spence Anderson , Worcester, Mass. 

Mrs. Larz Anderson Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. Richard Barclay Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Bessie G. Bissell Duhuque, la. 

Miss Marion L. Blake Boston, Mass. 

Miss Emily L. Blodgett South Lincoln, Mass. 

Mrs. Edward W. Bok Merion, Pa. 

Miss Elsa Bowman New York City. 



140 

Mrs. Henry Harlow Brooks New York City. 

Mrs. Henry Stanford Brooks, Jr Woodstock, Vt. 

Mr. James Crosby Brown Rosemont. Pa. 

Miss Eleanor Olivia Brownell .> TJtica, N. Y. 

Mrs. William Story Bullard Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Joseph Kerr Cass Tyrone, Pa. 

Mrs. Benjamin P. Cheney Boston. Mass. 

Miss A. W. Cheyney South Manchester, Conn. 

Miss F. W. Cheyney South Manchester, Conn. 

Miss L. Cheyney South Manchester, Conn. 

Miss Myra Barrett Culin Pasadena. Cal. 

Mrs. Herbert Seymour Darlington Villa Nova, Pa. 

Mrs. J. E. Davis Boston, Mass. 

Miss C. E. Day Hartford, Conn. 

Miss S. R. Dunham Hartford, Conn. 

Mr. Maskell Ewing Villa Nova. Pa. 

Mrs. J. W. Farwell Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Frank N. Fauvre Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mrs. Edith Newlin Fell Philadelphia. 

Mr. Harvey Fisk Wiiburtha, N. J. 

Me. Wilbur C. Fisk New York City. 

Mrs. Stanley G. Flagg, Jr Villa Nova, Pa. 

Fleischmann's Model Bakery Philadelphia. 

Miss Anna Delany Fry Philadelphia. 

Miss Ruth Gentry Stilesville, Ind. 

Miss Ethel M. Girdwood Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. W. L. Goodwin Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. W. H. Gore Salem, Mass. 

Miss E. C. Harrington Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Edward Y. Hartshorne Merion, Pa. 

Mrs. A. R. Hillyer Camden, Me. 

Miss Lucia Shaw Holliday Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mrs. Arthur Hunnewell Boston, Mass. 

Miss Grace Hutchins Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. Thomas Reid Kackley Paris, France. 

Mrs. William Kelley Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Lee Olds Kellogg Temascaltepec, Mexico. 

Mr. George W. Kendrick, Jr Philadelphia. 

Miss H. Lambert Philadelphia. 

Miss C. B. La Monte Bound Brook. N. J. 

Miss Linda Bartels Lange Haines Falls, N. Y.. 

Dr. Robert G. Le Conte Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Joseph Lee Boston, Mass. 

Miss Leslie New York City. 

Miss Constance Davis Leupp New York City. 

Mr. J. Barton Longacre Philadelphia. 

Miss Katharine Lord Plymouth, Mass. 

Mr. W. R. Lord Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. A. C. Lyman Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. Edwin M. Mulock Paxtang, Pa. 

Mr. Arthur E. Newbold Philadelphia. 

Mr. A. Edward Newton Philadelphia. 

Miss Elizabeth Oliphant Overbrook, Pa. 

Miss Emily Waterman Palmer Philadelphia. 

Miss Mary W. Paul Philadelphia. 

The Misses Pearsall Ardmore, Pa. 



141 



Miss Gladys Pray Passaic, N. J. 

Me. Thomas M. Rightee Mount Carmel, Pa. 

Mrs. Gardner Rogers Houghton, Mich. 

Mr. II. B. Rosengarten Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Katharine A. Ruschenberger Strafford, Pa. 

Mrs. Charles G. Rupert Marshallton, Del. 

Mr. Alexander Saunders Yonkers, N. Y. 

Mes. Peter Shields . . . Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mr. Sam-uel Shoemaker Philadelphia. 

Me. F. M. Stanwood Boston, Mass. 

Miss Henrietta Foster Thacher New Haven, Conn. 

Miss Elizabeth Parkee Townsend Brookline, Mass. 

Miss H. K. Van Wagenen Orange, N. J. 

Mr. Charles P. Vaughn Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Robert W. Walcott Cambridge, Mass. 

Miss Evelyn Walker Brookline, Mass. 

Mrs. S. Burns Weston Merion, Pa. 

Mrs. J. C. H. Williams Hartford, Conn. 

Donors of $25 or over but under $50. 

Miss Margaruite Sheldon Allen Cleveland, o. 

Miss Corona Anderson Ardmore, Pa. 

Mrs. Sidney Babson , Mt. Hood, Ore. 

Mr. Joseph F. Bailey Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Charles H. Barnes 

Mes. D. N. Barney FarrningLun, conn. 

Mr. Dimner Beebee Philadelphia. 

Mr. Edward Bettle, Je Haverford, Pa. 

Mrs. A. M. Bienenfeld San Francisco, Cal. 

Mr. C L. Bird , East Walpole, Mass. 

Mr. I. J. Blackstone Chicago. 

Mrs. Heney Clayton Blackwell Trenton, N. J. 

Miss Elizabeth M. Blanchard Bellefonte, Pa. 

Me. Ieving W. Bonbeight Philadelphia. 

Me. E. P. Boeden Philadelphia. 

Mrs. I. Bowditch Cambridge, Mass. 

Mrs. L. Beaineed Hartford, Conn. 

Mes. Louis D. Beandeis Boston, Mass. 

Miss E. Josephine Brazier Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Joseph H. Braziee Philadelphia. 

Miss Rachel S. Brewer Milton, Mass. 

Mrs. W. Brewstee Cambridge, Mass. 

Me. Huntee Brooke Philadelphia. 

M'ES. Reynolds Driver Brown Philadelphia. 

Miss Jane L. Brownell Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mr. Heney E. Busch Philadelphia. 

Miss Emma Cadbuey, Je Moorestown, N. J. 

Mes. Philip Powell Calveet Philadelphia. 

Mes. W. W. Card Pittsfleld, Mass. 

Mrs. Samuel Carr ' Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. James B. Case Boston, Mass. 

Centeal Pennsylvania Beyn Mawe Club Central Pennsylvania. 

Miss Caemelita Chase Omaha, Neb. 

Mrs. Aethue Cheney Boston, Mass. 

Miss A. B. Cheney South Manchester, Conn. 



142 

Miss D. Cheney South Manchester, Conn. 

Mrs. L. R. Cheney Hartford, Conn. 

Miss R. Cheney South Manchester, Conn. 

Mks. Winston Chdechill Cornish, N. H. 

Mr. Walton Clark Philadelphia. 

Miss Leslie Clark Cleveland, O. 

Miss Louise Congdon Chicago. 

Mrs. .T. S. Cox Philadelphia. 

Mrs. George Crocker Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. Charles A. Cummings Boston, Mass. 

The Hon. C. H. Dawes Chicago. 

Miss Eleaner Deming Putnam, Conn. 

The Dreka Company Philadelphia. 

Mrs. R. N. Dcrfee Fall River, Mass. 

Mrs. W. Harrison Eisenbrey Haverford, Pa. 

Mrs. William P. Ellison Philadelphia. 

Miss Helena Titus Emerson New York City. 

Mrs. Elie Erismann Lambertville, N. J. 

Mrs. John Wood Farlow Boston, Mass. 

Miss Clara E. Farr Philadelphia. 

Mrs. William Hathaway Forbes Milton, Mass. 

Mrs. William C. Fordyce St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. Richard S. Francis Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Susan Braley Franklin Jamestown, L. I. 

Miss L. R. Frothingham Peekskill, N. Y. 

Mr, Carl M. Gage Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Percival Gallagher Boston. Mass. 

Mrs. R. H. I. Goddard Providence, R. I. 

Miss Elizabeth Goodrich Chicago. 

Miss Eleanor Gosling St. Davids, Pa. 

Mrs. Edwin Herbert Grafton Trenton, N. J. 

Mr. John J. Gribbel Wyncote, Pa. 

Mb. J. Jarden Gunther Haverford, Pa. 

Mrs. Harold Hack Short Hills, N. J. 

Mrs. Hugh Henry Hanna, Jr Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mr. Henry R. Hatfield Philadelphia. 

Mr. R. R. Haydock Philadelphia. 

Mr. S. A. Hendrickson Philadelphia. 

Miss Mildred Hippee Des Moines, la. 

Ms. Charles E. Hires Haverford, Pa. 

Miss Emily A. Hochstetter Philadelphia. 

Mrs. C. W. Hubbard Auburndale, Mass. 

Mrs. John Henry Huddleston New York City. 

Mr. John F. Huneker Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Edward W. Hutchins Boston, Mass. 

Mr. J. B. Hutchinson Philadelphia. 

Miss Mary H. Ingham Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Melancthon Jacobus Hartford, Conn. 

Baroness Serge Alexander Korff Washington, D. C. 

Miss Elizabeth R. Laird South Hadley, Mass 

Mr. William H. Lambert Philadelphia. 

Miss Elizabeth Landon Indianapolis, Ind. 

Miss Agatha Laughlin Philadelphia. 

Miss Edith Lawrence Windsor, Vt. 

Mr. Howard W. Lewis Philadelphia. 

Miss Emma H. Linburg Trenton, N. J. 



143 



Miss Mary Hunter Linn Bellefonte, Pa. 

Mrs. C. H. Ludington, Jr Haverford, Pa. 

Miss F. Lyman Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. T. Lyman Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. F. H. MacMorris Philadelphia. 

Miss Mary Helen MacCoy Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Benjamin Schreiber Mbchling Philadelphia. 

Mr. W. S. Meyers 

Miss Madge D. Miller New York City. 

Mrs. Christian Moore Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Catharine W. Morris Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mrs. Charles E. Morris Philadelphia. 

Miss Margaret Morris New Haven, Conn. 

Mr. Robert McNeil Morse Jamaica Plain, Mass 

Mrs. Byron P. Moulton Ardmore, Pa. 

Miss Content S. Nichols Binghamton, N. Y. 

Miss Clara M. Owen Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Henry Greenleaf Pearson Boston, Mass. 

Miss Florence Peebles Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss M. W. Peirce Topsfield. Mass. 

Mrs. Howard Magill Phillips Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Frederick Leslie Ransome Washington, D. C. 

Miss Marie Reimer New York City. 

The Hon. John E. Reyburn Philadelphia. 

Mr. I. T. Richey Trenton, N. J. 

Mrs. George B. Roberts Bala, N. J. 

Mr. Frederick W. Schmidt Radnor, Pa. 

Miss Gertrude C. Schmidt Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mrs. Samuel Bryan Scott Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Grace Scudder Cambridge, Mass. 

Mr. Howard Sellers Upper Darby, Pa. 

Mrs. Edward B. Sexton New York City. 

Mr. Edward B. Sexton New York City. 

Mr. A. Marshall Sheppard Philadelphia. 

Miss Katharine M. Shipley Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Judge N. Shipman Hartford, Conn. 

Miss Charlotte Siler Philadelphia. 

Mr. Isaac H. Silverman Jenkintown, Pa. 

Mrs. William Simpson, Jr Overbrook, Pa. 

Mrs. Otis Skinner Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mr. W. C. Skinner Hartford, Conn. 

Miss Annie Malcolm Slade Yonkers, N. Y. 

Mrs. W. C. Smith Saginaw, Mich. 

Mr. Charles A. Spiegel Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Ruter William Springer Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. Walter B. Stephenson Haverford, Pa. 

Mrs. Brooks Stevens Lowell, Mass. 

Miss A. A. Stewart Halifax, N. S. 

Mrs. John C. Stine New Hope, Pa. 

Miss Amy Sussman San Francisco, Cal. 

Miss Marion Russell Taber New York City. 

Mrs. John Stewart Tanner Greenwich, Conn. 

Mrs. A. S. Tapley Boston, Mass. 

Miss Elizabeth W. Towle New York City. 

Mr. George Tyson Boston, Mass. 

Mr. John L. Vandiver Philadelphia. 



144 



Mrs. Henry Mather Warren Devon, Pa. 

Miss M. C. Wheeler Providence, R. I. 

Miss Martha Root White New York City. 

Miss M. Whitehead Trenton, N. J. 

Miss Mary P. Williamson Cleveland, O. 

Mrs. James D. Winsor Haverford, Pa. 

Mr. Edward R. Wood Philadelphia. 

Miss Juliana Wood Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Vernon Ames Wright South Lincoln, Mas 

Miss F. Young , Boston, Mass. 

s 

Donors of $10 and over hut under $25. 

Mr. Frederick T. Ackerman Bronxville, N. Y. 

Miss Grace Albert Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mr. W. S. Appleton Boston, Mass. 

Miss Anna Austin Rosemont, Pa. 

Mrs. Thomas P. Ballard East Cleveland, O. 

Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Alvin Barton Barber Portland, Ore. 

Mr. H. B. Barnes, Jr New York City. 

Mrs. John Hampton Barnes Devon, Pa. 

Miss Josephine R. Bates Cambridge, Mass. 

Mrs. Edward Bergstrom Los Angeles, Cal. 

Miss Lydia Trueman Boring Philadelphia. 

Miss S. F. Bremer Boston, Mass. 

Miss Harriet M. Brownell Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Buckminster Burlington, Mass. 

Miss Edith F. Claflin Cambridge, Mass. 

Miss Agnes Clarke Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Julia Quinta Davidson New York City. 

Miss Constance Deming New York City. 

Mrs. A. Dennison Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. Eldridge Boston, Mass. 

Miss Elizabeth Wales Emmons Brookline, Mass. 

Miss C. Erismann Lambertvill.e, N. J. 

Mrs. Henry Minor Esterly Portland, Ore. 

Miss Helen M. Evers St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. Edgar H. Evans Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mrs. Joseph Dysart Findley Altoona, Pa. 

Miss S. E. Fountain New York City. 

Mrs. William Otis Gay Boston, Mass. 

Miss Josephine Clara Goldmark New York City. 

Mrs. J. J. Goodwin Hartford, Conn. 

Miss Mary Grant Chicago. 

Miss Margaret Griffith Ebensburg, Pa. 

Mrs. G. P. Hamlin Boston, Mass. 

Miss Haebine Hazen Cincinnati. O. 

Miss Adelaide Heilbeon Seattle, Wash. 

Mrs. Charles P. Hemenway Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. E. T. Hodges Indianapolis, Ind. 

Miss Alice Watkins Hood Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. G. Hubbard Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. M. L. Johnston Chicago. 

Miss Edith Kelly Pittsburgh, Pa. 



145 



Mrs. Kendall Boston, Mass. 

Miss S. B. Kimball Boston, Mass. 

Me. David H. Lane Philadelphia. 

Miss Grace E. Lawton Newport, R. I. 

Mrs. Ernest A. Limburg New York City. 

Mrs. Donald Brigham Logan Worcester, Mass. 

Mrs. C. Lombardi Portland, Ore. 

Mrs. A. J. Lyman Philadelphia. 

Miss E. D. Markle Los Angeles, Cal. 

Miss Elizabeth F. McKeen New York City. 

Miss Bertha V. Merrick Philadelphia. 

Mr. T. H. Metcalf Woonsocket, R. I. 

Mrs. Neil Robert Montgomery Trenton, N. J. 

Mrs. Henry Wilson Moorhousb Ardmore, Pa. 

Mrs. Charles W. Morris Indianapolis, Ind. 

Miss Adele Morris Rosemont, Pa. 

Miss Lilian V. Moser Portland, Me. 

Mr. B. Nichols and Miss Nichols Boston, Mass. 

Miss Louise Norcross Carlisle, Pa. 

Miss Mary J. Norcross Carlisle, Pa. 

Mr. Alexander Ennis Patton Curwensville, Pa. 

The Rev. George Lyman Payne Dorchester, Mass. 

Miss Bertha Pearson Portland, Me. 

Mrs. Frederick L. Pease Pelham Manor, N. Y. 

Mr. H. N. Perkins Hartford, Conn. 

Miss Ella Riegel Wilmington, Del. 

Mrs. Joseph Haswell Robinson Hanover, N. H. 

Miss Eleanor Rdth Rockwood Portland, Ore. 

Mr. S. Rodman Boston, Mass. 

Miss Margaret Scott Philadelphia. 

Mr. J. H. Scddder Trenton, N. J. 

Mrs. George R. Shaw Boston, Mass. 

Miss Alfreda Shipley Cincinnati, O. 

Miss Martha Silsbee Boston, Mass. 

Miss Elizabeth P. Smith Philadelphia. 

Miss Margery Smith Ballston Spa, N. Y. 

Miss Mildred Stampfer Duhuque, la. 

Miss Nettie Maria Stevens Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss Margaret A. Steel Port Deposit, Md. 

Miss Fay M. Stockwell Newburgh, N. Y. 

Miss Marguerite Sweet New York City. 

Mrs. E. Thayer , Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. G. B. Titus Easton, Pa. 

Miss Susan Frances Van Kirk Philadelphia. 

Dr. and Mrs. Herman F. Vickery Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. Timothy Walsh Brookline, Mass. 

Miss Carol Walton Hummelstown, Pa. 

Miss Florence Wardwell Springfield Centre, N. Y. 

Mrs. W. Nelson L. West Wynnewood, Pa. 

Miss Margaret White Cambridge, Mass. 

Mrs. Frederick A. Whitwbll Boston, Mass. 

Miss Esther Williams Milton, Mass. 

Mrs. Edmund B. Wilson New York City. 

Mrs. George Arthur Wilson Syracuse, N. Y. 

Miss Beatrice Wood New York City. 

Mrs. E. S. Wood Trenton, N. J. 



146 



Donors of $5 and over out under $10. 

Mrs. W. H. H. Andrews Merion, Pa. 

Miss Marion C. Balch Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Mr. Wilfred Bancroft Philadelphia. 

Miss H. C. Belfield Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. W. D. Boardman Salem, Mass. 

Mrs. C. H. Breed Lambertville, N. J. 

Miss M. W. Brown Lexington, Ky. 

Mrs. A. B. Childs Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. James Ford Clapp Squantam, Mass. 

Miss P. S. Clifford New York City. 

Miss Katharine Innes Cook Cambridge, Mass. 

Mr. W. A. Cornelius Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Edward Parker Davis Philadelphia. 

Mr. G. J. Fisher Milton, Mass. 

Miss M. T. Fisk Wilburtha, N. J. 

Miss Dorothy Foster Newtonville, Mass. 

Dr. L. Webster Fox Haverford, Pa. 

Mrs. Charles M. Goethe Portland, Ore. 

Miss Emmeline Gowen Philadelphia. 

Miss Elizabeth M. Griffiths Boston, Mass. 

Miss Emma Haevernick "'liladelphia. 

Miss Amanda Hendrickson Philadelphia. 

Mrs. William B. Huff Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mrs. C. E. Jenkins Boston, Mass. 

Miss E. Johnson Hartford, conn. 

Miss M. Johnson Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Robena Joralemon Ardmore, Pa. 

Miss Gertrude Klein Philadelphia. 

Miss Johanna Koroeber New York City. 

Miss Bertha M. Laws Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Miss A. S. Lawther Dubuque, Ind. 

Miss M. R. Lawther Dubuque, Ind. 

Miss Lomes New York City. 

Mrs. H. V. Long Brookline, Mass. 

Miss E. L. Lord Baltimore, Md. 

Miss Margaret Baxter MacDonald State College, Pa. 

Miss S. A. McCown Jenkintown, Pa. 

Miss M. B. McMullin Philadelphia. 

Miss F. L. Mead Brookline, Mass. 

Mrs. C. S. Morgan Baltimore, Md. 

Mr. A. C. Ransoms* Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. Marshall J. Reynolds* Chicago. 

Miss M. S. Robinson Hartford, Conn. 

Miss Emma Rodman Boston, Mass. 

Miss Margaret Scruggs Dallas. Tex. 

Miss Edith Forsyth Sharpless Haverford, Pa. 

Miss Sarah Stites Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Miss Miriam Thomas Haverford, Pa. 

Miss E. B. Thompson Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. Thurston Portland, Me. 

Miss Margaret G. Thurston Portland, Me. 

Miss Hope Traver Hartford, Conn. 

♦Deceased. 



147 



Mrs. C. D. Warner Hartford, Conn. 

Miss E. Weld* .Boston, Mass. 

Miss Natalie Whitwell Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. Thomas L. Wiles* Boston, Mass. 

Miss Gwendolen Brown Wilis Racine, Wis. 

Miss Helen A. Wilson Portland, Ore. 

Mrs. Mart Bunting Wolf Philadelphia. 

Miss Bertha Gordon Wood New Bedford, Mass. 

Miss M. L. Wright Boston, Mass. 

Donors of $1 or over but under $5. 

Miss Helen Dudley : Chicago. 

Miss Katharine Dudley Chicago. 

Mrs. Samuel Bmlen, Jr Philadelphia. 

Miss Alice Peirson Gannett New York City. 

Miss Jeanne Colston Howard Staunton, Va. 

Mrs. Howard M. Johnson London, England. 

Miss E. Kellogg Brookline, Mass. 

Mrs. Otto August Kreutzberg Chicago. 

Miss K. N. Morse Haverhill, Mass. 

Miss G. M. Richardson Belmont, Mass. 

Mrs. Alfred S. Weill Philadelphia. 

Miss Virginia Yardley New York City. 



Collections from Glasses (including pledges). 



Class of 1889 $1,707.00 Class of 1902. 



1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 



2,785.00 

512.40 

953.00 

478.00 

207.75 

512.00 

1,351.35 

655.10 

1,244.00 

1,099.86 

1,475.50 

3,574.47 



1903. 



$343.00 

4,559.60 

1904 794.00 

1905 885.10 

1906.. 5,748.75 

1907 *85,120.00 

1908 4,815.74 

1909 4,416.92 

Ph.D.'s 241.00 

Graduate students 16.00 

Class of 1904, M'mor'l gift 300.00 

1896, D'cenn'l gift 576.80 



*Deceased. 

*From Mrs. Anna Woerishoffer, $10,000 
$70,000. 



from Miss Carlotta Woerishoffer, 



XIII. 



Donors to the Gymnasium Fund. 

Undergraduate Association $21,742.79 

Mr. William L. Austin 1,000.00 

Mr. Henry H. Collins 1,000.00 

The late Mr. John H. Converse 1,000.00 

Mr. Alba B. Johnson 1,000.00 

The late Mr. William P. Henszey and Mrs. Henszey 1,000.00 

Dr. John P. Munn (for Miss Aristine Munn) 1,000.00 

The late Mr. J. W. Paul, Jr 1,000.00 

Mr. Joseph N. Pew 1,000.00 

The late Mr. Francis L. Potts and Mrs. Potts 1,000.00 

Mr. Charles E. Pugh 1,000.00 

Mr. Justus C. Strawbridge 2,000.00 

Mr. Samuel M. Vauclain 1,000.00 

Miss Cynthia M. Wesson 7,293.66 

Mr. Asa Wing 150.00 

Mr. Alexander C. Wood 150.00 

Athletic Association 320.14 



148 



ANNUAL REPORT 



THE PRESIDENT 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



1910-11. 



Philadelphia : 

the john c. winston co. 

1911. 



Corporation-. 

Academic Year, 1911-12. 
Howard Comfort, 

President. 

Asa S. Wing, Edward Bettle, Jr., 

Treasurer. Secretary. 

Albert K. Smiley. M. Carey Thomas. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. Francis R. Cope, Jr. 

Howard Comfort. Asa S. Wing. 

James Wood. Charles J. Rhoads. 

Rufus M. Jones. Thomas Raeburn White. 

Alexander C. Wood. Frederic H. Strawbridge. 

Board of Directors. 

Academic Year, 1911-12. 

Howard Comfort, 

Chairman. 

Asa S. Wing, Edward Bettle, Jr., 

Treasurer. Secretary. 

Albert K. Smiley. Francis R. Cope, Jr. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. Asa S. Wing. 

Howard Comfort. Charles J. Rhoads. 

James Wood. Thomas Raeburn White. 

Rufus M. Jones. Frederic H. Strawbridge. 

Alexander C. Wood. Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 

M. Carey Thomas. Mary E. Garrett. 
Anna Rhoads Ladd. 

Executive Committee. 

Howard Comfort. M. Carey Thomas. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. Francis R. Cope, Jr. 

Rufus M. Jones. James Wood. 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 

Alexander C. Wood. Charles J. Rhoads. 

Asa S. Wing. Mary E. Garrett. 

M. Carey Thomas. Frederic H. Strawbridge. 

Finance Committee. 

Charles J. Rhoads. Asa S. Wing. 

Alexander C. Wood. Mary E. Garrett. 

Library Committee. 

Edward Bettle, Jr. Rufus M. Jones. 

Howard Comfort. Thomas Raeburn White. 

Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 

Religious Life Committee. 

Rufus M. Jones. James Wood. 

Asa S. Wing. 

(iii) 



IV 

Officers of Administration. 

Academic Year, 1911-12. 

President, 
M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Acting Dean of the College, 
Marion Edwards Park, A.M. 
Office: Taylor Hall. 

lit' cording Dean and Assistant to the President, 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Secretary, 
Anna Bell Lawther, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Recording Secretary, 
Edith Orlady, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Comptroller, 
James G. Forrester, M.A. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Business Agent, 
Maria Hawes Albee, A.M. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Wardens of the Halls of Residence, 
Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Pembroke Hall. 
Helen Remington Calder, Radnor Hall. 
Mabel Harriet Norton, A.B., Denbigh Hall. 
Edith Buell Wright, A.B., Merion Hall. 
Jane Righter, Rockefeller Hall. 
Alice Hill Byrne, A.B., Assistant Warden, Pembroke Hall. 

Librarian, 
Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S. Office: The Library. 

Director of Athletics and Gymnastics, 
Constance M. K. Applebee. Office: The Gymnasium. 

Junior Bursar, 
Margaret A. Proctor, B.A. Office: Rockefeller Hall. 

Physician in Chief, 
Thomas F. Branson, M.D. Office hours, daily, 8 to 9.30 and 2 to 3, 
Rosemont, Pa. 

Assistant Physician, 
Marianna Taylor, M.D. Office hours, 2 to 3 daily except Monday, 7 to 
8 daily, St. David's, Pa.; Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr College, daily, 
except Sunday, 4 to 6. 

Examining Oculist, 
Helen Murphy, M.D. Office hours, daily, 2 to 4, 1433 Spruce Street, 
Philadelphia. 



Academic Appointments. 
Academic Year, 1911-12. 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the College and Professor 

of English. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1877; studied at the Johns Hopkins University, 1877-78; 
University of Leipsic, 1879-82; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1882; Sorbonne and 
College de France, 1S83; Dean of the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College and Professor 
of English, 1885-94. 

Charlotte Angas Scott, D.Sc, Alumna Professor of Mathematics. 

Lincoln, England. Graduate in Honours, Girton College, University of Cambridge, 
England, 1880; B.Sc, University of London 1882; Lecturer on Mathematics in 
Girton College, 1880-S4; lectured in connection with Newnham College, University 
of Cambridge, England, 1880-83; D.Sc, University of London, 1885. 

George A. Barton, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Literature and Semitic 

Languages. 

A.B., Haverford College, 1882, and A.M., 1885; studied under the direction of the 
American Institute of Hebrew, 1885-86; Harvard University, 1888-91; Thayer 
Scholar, Harvard University, 1889-91; A.M., Harvard University, 1890; Ph.D., 
Harvard University. 1891; Director of the American School of Oriental Study and 
Research in Palestine, 1902-03. 

Joseph W. Warren, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

A.B., Harvard College, 1871; University of Berlin, 1871-72; Universitv of Leipsic, 
1872-73; University of Bonn, 1873-79: M.D., Universitv of Bonn, 1880; Assistant 
and Instructor in Physiology, Harvard Medical School, 1881-91; Lecturer in Medical 
Department of the University of the City of New York, 1885-86; Lecturer in Physiology, 
University of Michigan, 1889. 

Elmer P. Kohler, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., Muhlenberg College, 1886, and A.M., 1889; Johns Hopkins University, 1889-91; 
Fellow in Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 1891-92; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1892. 

Florence Bascom, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1882, B.Sc, 1884, and A.M., 1887; Johns Hopkins 
University, 1891-93; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1893; Assistant in Geology 
and Instructor in Petrography, Ohio State University, 1893-95. 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D., Recording Dean and Assistant to the 

President. 

Reading, England. B.Sc, University of London, 1893. Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 
1896, and B.A., Trinity College, Dublin, 1905; Girton College, University of Cambridge, 
England, 1889-92; Graduate in Honours, First Class, in the Cambridge Mathematical 
Tripos, 1892; Graduate in Honours. Final Mathematical Schools, University of Oxford, 
1892; Graduate Student in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93, and Fellow in 
Mathematics, 1893-94; Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, and 
Student in Mathematics, L'niversity of Gottingen, 1894-95. 

Wilmer Cave Wright, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Shrewsbury, England. Girton College, University of Cambridge, England, 1888-92; 
Graduate in Honours, Cambridge Classical Tripos. 1892; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
1895; Fellow in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93; Fellow in Latin, University of 
Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in Greek, 1894-95; Reader in Greek and Latin, Universitv 
of Chicago, 1895-96. 

James H. Leuba, Ph.D.. Professor of Psychology and Education and 

Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. B.S., University of Neuchatel, 1886; Ph.B., Ursinus College, 
1888; Scholar in Psychology, Clark University, 1892-93; Fellow in Psychology, Clark- 
University, 1893-95; Ph.D., Clark University, 1896. 



VI 

Fonqer DeHaan, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish. 

Leeuwarden, Holland. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1895; Instructor in Modern 
Languages, Lehigh University, 1885-91; Fellow in Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1893-94, Assistant in Romance Languages, 1893-95, Instructor in Romance 
Languages, 1895-96, and Associate in Romance Languages, 1896-97. 

Albert Schinz,* Ph.D., Professor of French Literature. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. A.B., University of Neuchatel, 1888, and A.M., 1889. 
Licentiate in Theology, 1892; Student, University of Berlin, 1892-93; University of 
Tubingen, 1893; Ph.D., University of Tubingen, 1894; Sorbonne and College de 
France, 1894; Privatdocent, University of Neuchatel, 1896-97; Instructor in French, 
Clark University, 1897-98; Instructor in French, University of Minnesota, 1898-99. 

Arthur Leslie Wheeler, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893; Scholar and Student in Classics, Yale College, 1893-96; 
Ph.D., Yale University, 1896; Instructor and Tutor in Latin, Yale College, 1894-1900. 

Henry Nevill Sanders, Ph.D., Professor of Greek. 

Edinburgh, Scotland. A.B., Trinity University, Toronto, 1S94, and A.M., 1897; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1903; Fellow in Greek, Johns Hopkins University, 1897-98; 
Lecturer in Greek, McGill University, 1900-02. 

William Bashford Huff, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1889; A.M., University of Chicago, 1896; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1900; Lecture Assistant in Physics, Johns Hopkins University, 
1899-1900, Assistant in Physics, 1900-01, and Instructor in Physics, 1901-02. 

William Rot Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

A.B., University of Texas, 1897, and A.M., 1908; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1903; 
Acting Professor of History and Political Science, University of Colorado, 1900-01; 
Lecturer in History, Barnard College, 1901-02. 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, A.B., Professor of English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1893; University of Oxford, England, and University of 
Leipsic, 1893-94; Sorbonne and College de France, and University of Leipsic, 1894-95. 

Karl Detlev Jessen, Ph.D., Professor of German Literature. 

Winnemark, Sehleswig-Holstein, Germany. A.B., University of Chicago, 1896, and 
Fellow in German, 1897-98; Ph.D., University of Berlin, 1901; University of Chicago, 
1895-98; University of Kiel, 1899; University of Berlin, 1898-1901; Acting Professor 
of Modern Languages, Eureka College, 1896; Instructor in German, Iowa State 
University, 1897; Instructor in German, Harvard University, 1901-03, and Lecturer 
on German Literature and Aesthetics, 1904. 

Tenney Frank, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin. 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1898, and A.M., 1899; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1903: 
Fellow, University of Chicago, 1899-1901 ; Assistant and Associate in Latin, Universitv 
of Chicago, 1901-04. 

David Hilt Tennent,* Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology. 

S.B., Olivet College, 1900; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1902-04: Bruce Fellow, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1904; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1904. 

Nettie Maria Stevens, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Morphology. 

A.B., Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 1899, and A.M., 1900; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1903; Student in Hopkins Seaside Laboratory, Pacific Grove, Summer, 1897, 
1898, 1899, and 1900. Graduate Scholar in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1900-01; 
Holder of the President's European Fellowship, 1901-02; Student, Zoological Station, 
Naples, and University of Wiirzburg, 1901-02, 1908-09; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1902-03, and Research Fellow in Biology, 1903-04; Carnegie Research Assistant, 
1904-05; Alice Freeman Palmer Research Fellow, 1908-09. 

Carleton Fairchild Brown,* Ph.D., Professor of English Philology. 

A.B., Carleton College, 1888; A.M., Harvard University, 1901, and Ph.D., 1903. 
Shattuck Scholar, Harvard Universitv, 1901-03; Instructor in English, Harvard 
University, 1903-05. 



* Granted leave of absence for the year 1911-12. 



Vll 

James Barnes, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia. B.A., Dalhousie University, Honours in Mathematics and 
Physics, 1899, and M.A., 1900; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1904. Holder of 
1851 Exhibition Science Research Scholarship, 1900-03; Fellow, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1903-04, and Assistant in Physics, 1904-06. 

Richard Thayer Holbrook, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French 
Philology and Italian. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1902. Sorbonne, College 
de France, Ecole des Chartes, 1893-94, 1895-96; Student in Italy and University 
of Berlin, 1894-95; Student in Spain, 1901; Tutor in the Romance Languages and 
Literatures, Yale University, 1896-1901, and Columbia University, 1902-06. 

Theodore de Leo de Lacuna, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., University of California, 1896, and A.M., 1899; Ph D., Cornell University, 1901. 
Teacher in the Government Schools of the Philippine Islands, 1901-04; Honorarv 
Fellow and Assistant in Philosophy, Cornell University, 1904-05; Assistant Professor 
of the Philosophy of Education, University of Michigan, 1905-07. 

Marion Reilly,* A.B., Dean of the College and Reader in Philosophy. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02, 1903, 
1903-06; Newnham College, University of Cambridge, Spring 1907. 

Marion Parris, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901, and Ph.D., 1909. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1902-05, Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1905-06: Bryn Mawr College 
Research Fellow and Student in Economics and Politics. University of Vienna, 1906-07. 

Frederick Htjtton Getman, Ph.D., Associate in Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1903. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1893-96; 
University of Virginia, 1896-97; Fellow in Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 
1902-03, and Fellow by Courtesy, 1903-04; Carnegie Research Assistant in Physical 
Chemistry. 1903-04; Lecturer in Physical Chemistry, College of the City of New York, 
1904-05, and Lecturer in Physics, Columbia University, 1907-08. 

Clarence Errol Ferree, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Psychology. 

B.S., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1900, A.M., 190', and M.S., 1902; Ph.D., Cornell 
University, 1909. Fellow in Psychology, Cornell University, 1902-03; Assistant in 
Psychology, Cornell University, 1903-07. 

Orie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., Associate in Comparative Literature and 

Elizabethan Literature. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1888. Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1903. Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1901-03, and Fellow in English, 1903-04. 

A'-FRED Horatio Upham, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English Literature. 

A.B., Miami University, 1897, and A.M., 1898; A.M., Harvard University, 1901; Ph.D., 
Columbia University, 190S. Instructor in Latin and Greek. Miami University, 1897- 
1900; Graduate Student, Harvard University, 1900-02; Professor of English/Agricul- 
tural College of Utah, 1902-05; Columbia University Fellow in Comparative Literature, 
1905-06; Associate Professor of English, Miami University, 1906-08, and Professor 
of English and Head of the Department, 1908-10. 

Chester Albert Reeds, Ph.D., Associate in Geology. 

B.S., University of Oklahoma, 1905; M.S., Yale University, 1907, and Ph.D., 1910. 
Graduate Scholar, Yale University, 1905-06, and Fellow, 1906-08; Field Assistant, 
U. S. Geological Survey. 1903-06; Instructor in Mineralogy and Petrology, Universitv 
of Oklahoma, February to June, 1908. 

Agathe Lasch, Ph.D., Associate in Teutonic Philology. 

Berlin, Germany. Ph.D., University of Heidelberg, 1909. Student, University of Halle, 
1906-07; University of Heidelberg, 1907-10. State Examination -pro facilitate docendi, 
Karlsruhe, 1910. 

Grace Mead Andrus de Laguna, Ph.D., Associate in Philosophy. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1903, and Ph.D., 1906. Sage Scholar in Philosophy, Cornell 
University, 1903-05; Alice Freeman Palmer Fellow of Wellesley College, 1905-06- 
Reader in Philosophy, Brvn Mawr College, 1907-08. 



Granted leave of absence for the year 1911-12. 



Vlll 

Marion Edwards Park,* A.M., Acting Dean of the College 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1898, and A.M., 1899. Bryn Mawr European Fellow and 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99; University of Chicago, Autumn 
Quarter, 1900; American School of Classical Studies in Athens, 1901-02; Instructor in 
Classics, Colorado College. 1902-03, 1904-06, and Acting Dean of Women, 1903-04; 
Teacher in Mies Wheeler's School, Providence, R. I., 1906-09. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., Non-Resident Lecturer in English Diction. 

Tynemouth, England. M.A., University of London, 1900. Special Lecturer in Elocution, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1901 ; Special Lecturer in Elocution, University of California, 
1902. 

Georgiana Goddard KiNG,f A.M., Reader in English and Lecturer in Art. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1897. Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1896-97, and Fellow in English, 1897-98. College de France, First Semester, 
1898-99. 

Harry Bateman, M.A., Lecturer in Mathematics. 

Manchester, England. M.A., University of Cambridge; Graduate in Honours (Senior 
Wrangler, bracketed) in the Cambridge Mathematical Tripos, 1903, and First Division, 
First Class, Mathematical Tripos, Part II, 1904; Smith's Prizeman, 1905; Fellow of 
Trinity College, Cambridge; Student in Gottingen and Paris, 1905-06; Lecturer in 
Mathematics, University of Liverpool, 1906-07; Reader in Mathematical Physics, 
Manchester University, 1907-09. 

Samuel Moore, J A.M., Lecturer in English Philology. 

A.B., Princeton University, 1899, and A.M., 1908. Instructor in English, University of 
Kansas, 1907-08; Townsend Scholar, Harvard University, 1909-10; Weld Scholar 
in English, Harvard University, 1910-11. 

Ellwood Austin Welden, Ph.D., Lecturer in French and Satiskrit. 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1903, and Ph.D., 1906. Harrison Scholar in Indo- 
European Philology, University of Pennsylvania, 1903-04; Fellow, 1904-06; University 
of Berlin, Summer Semester, 1905; Shattuck Scholar in Indie Philology, Harvard 
University, 1906-07; Student in Paris and Bologna, 1909-10. 

Sydney D. M. Hudson, Ph.B., Lecturer in Political Science. 

Ph.B., University of Syracuse, 1907. President's University Scholar, Columbia 
University, 1909-10, and George William Curtis Fellow in Political Science, 1910-11. 

Frederick Aldrich Cleveland, A.B., Lecturer in History. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1899. Assistant in Modern European History, Cornell 
University, 1908-09; President White Travelling Fellow and Student, Universities of 
Freiburg and Heidelberg, 1909-10; Harvard University, 1910-11. 

David M. Robinson, Ph.D., Non-resident Lecturer in Classical Archaeology. 

A.B., Chicago University, 1898, and Ph.D., 1904. Fellow in Greek, Chicago University, 
1899-1901; Student, American School of Classical Studies in Athens, 1901-02, and 
Fellow, 1902-03; University of Berlin, 1903-04; Assistant Professor of Greek, Illinois 
College, 1904-05; Associate and Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1905-11. 

Louis Cons,§ Lecturer in French. 

Lyons, France. Bachelier-es-lettres, Lyons University, 1896, and Licencie-es-lettres, 
University of Paris, 1899. The Sorbonne, 1901-03; Assistant in French, University 
of Berlin, 1906-08. Officier d'Academie. 

Harriet Randolph, Ph.D., Demonstrator in Biology and Reader in Botany. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1889; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1889-90; 
University of Zurich, 1890-92; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1892. 

Regina Katharine Crandall,! Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Smith College, 1890; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1902. Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in History, 1894-96; Assistant in Historv, 
Smith Co"llege, 1896-99; Instructor in History, Wellesley College, 1899-1900. 

Abby Kirk, A.B., Reader in Elementary G-n-eek. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1892. Reader in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-98. 

* Appointed as substitute for Dean Marion Reilly. 

fGranted leave of absence for the year 1911-12. 

% Appointed as Substitute for Professor Carleton Fairchild Brown. 

§ Appointed as Substitute for Professor Albert Schinz. 



Emma Haeberli, Ph.D., Reader in Elementary French. 

Berne, Switzerland, Ph.D., University of Berne, 1903. Graduate Student, University 
of Berne, and Tutor in French and German, 1904-05, 1906-09; Instructor in French 
and German, Virginia College, Roanoke, Va., 1909-10. 

Mary Jeffers, A.M., Reader in Elementary German. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1895, and A.M., 1897. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1895-98, 1903-04, 1906-07; Teacher of Latin in the Misses Shipley's School 
Bryn Mawr, 1895-98; Student at the Universities of Munich and Halle, 1898-99 
Teacher of Latin and History in the Girls' Latin School, Baltimore, Md., 1900-01 
Head of the Latin Department in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1897-1907 
Student, University of Bonn, summer of 1895; Private Tutor, 1892-1911; Supervisor 
of Greek, Latin, German and History Departments, Brantwood Hall, Bronxville, 
Lawrence Park, N. Y., 1905-07. 

Margaret Grace Skinner, M.A., Reader in English. 

Bedford, England. Girton College, University of Cambridge, England, 1902-06; 
Graduate in Honours, Modern and Mediaeval Languages Tripos, Part I, 1905; Part II, 
1906. M.A., Trinity College, Dublin, 1908. Teacher of English, Rosemary Hall, 
Greenwich, Conn., 1907-10. 

Edna Aston Shearer, A.B., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904; Junior Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 
1904-05; Holder of the President's Fellowship and Student, Universities of Edinburgh 
and Aberdeen, 1905-06; Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07; Teacher 
of English in the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1907-09, and Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Lily Ross Taylor, A.B., Reader and Demonstrator in the History of Art 
and Classical Archaeology. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1906. Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07; 
Fellow in Latin, 1907-08; Reader in Latin and Graduate Student, 1908-09; University 
of Chicago, Summer Quarter, 1907; University of Bonn, Summer Semester, 1909; 
American School of Classical Studies in Rome, 1909-10. 

Abigail Camp Dimon,* A.M., Reader in Biology. 

A.B., Brvn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1899. Vice-Principal of the High School, 
Clinton, N. Y., 1896-97; Assistant Teacher of English in the Utica Academy, 1897-98; 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99; Tutor, 1900-01; Graduate Student 
and Warden of Radnor Hall, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-04; Teacher of Science in the 
Balliol School, Utica, 1904-05, and of Science and Mathematics, 1905-08; Teacher 
in the New School, Utica, 1908-09. 

Beatrice Daw, A.M., Reader in English. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1909, and A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 1910. 

Mary Ruth Ethelwyn George, A.B., Assistant Reader in English. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1911. Hearer, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-10. 

Cornelia Catlin Coulter, Ph.D., Reader in Latin. 

A.B., Washington University, 1907, and Ph.D., Biyn Mawr College, 1911. Graduate 
Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08; President's European Fellow and 
Student, University of Munich, 1908-09; Fellow in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1909-10, 
and Fellow in Greek, 1910-11. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, A.M., Reader in Latin. 

A.B., University of Indiana, 1905, and A.M., 1906. Graduate Scholar in Greek, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1906-07, and Fellow in Greek, 1907-09; Mary E. Garrett European 
Fellow and Student, Universities of Berlin and Oxford and the American School of 
Classical Studies in Athens, 1909-10; Teacher in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn 
Mawr, 1910-11. 

Helen Schaeffer Huff, Ph.D., Reader in Mathematics. 

A.B., Dickinson College, 1903, A.M., 1905, and Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. 

Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-04, and Graduate Student 
in Physics, 1907-08; Fellow in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-05; Holder of the 
Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship and Student, University of Gottingen, 1905-06; 
Demonstrator in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07; Teacher in the Baldwin School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1907-08; Reader in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, Semester 
II, 1909-10. 

* Appointed as Substitute for Professor David Hilt Tennent. 



Helen Estabrook Sandison, A.M., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1906, and A.M., 1907. Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 
1906-07, 1910-11; Assistant Principal of the High School, Brookville, Ind., 1907-08; 
Fellow in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09; Holder of Special European Fellow- 
ship, Bryn Mawr College, and Student, University of Oxford, 1909-10. 

Mabel Kathryn Frehafer, A.M., Demonstrator in Physics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908; A.M., University of Wisconsin, 1909. Graduate 
Student, University of Wisconsin, 190S-09; Fellow in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 
1909-10. 

Jessie Williams Clifton, A.B., Demonstrator in Chemistry. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1911. 

Anna Bell Lawther, A.B., Secretary of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1897. Assistant Bursar, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-1900; 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 189S-99, 1904-05; Warden of Merion Hall, 
1904-05. 

Edith Orlady, A.B., Recording Secretary. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Warden of Pembroke Hall West, 1903-05, and Warden 
of Rockefeller Hall, 1905-06; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr Coliege, 1903-06, 1907-09. 

Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S., Librarian. 

B.L., University of Nebraska, 1885; B.L.S., New York State Library School, 1892. 
Acting Librarian and Adjunct Professor of Bibliography, University of Nebraska, 
1892-97; Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Economy, University of 
Illinois, 1897; Classifier, Iowa State University, 1898; Second Assistant Librarian, 
Los Angeles Public Library, 1898-99, and Librarian, 1900-05. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, Director of Athletics and Gytmiastics. 

Licentiate, British College of Physical Education, 189S, and Member, 1899. Gymnasium 
Mistress, Girls' Grammar School, Bradford, Yorkshire, 1899-1900; in the Arnold 
Foster High School, Burnley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901; in the High School, Halifax, 
Yorkshire, 1900-01; Head of Private Gymnasium, Ilkley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901;, 
Harvard School of Physical Training, Summer, 1901; Hockey Coach. Vassar College, 
Wellesley College, Radcliffe College, Mt. Holyoke College, Smith College, Bryn Mawr 
College, Boston Normal School of Gymnastics, 1901-04; Hockey Coach, Harvard 
Summer School of Gymnastics, 1906. 

Elizabeth Lawrence Gray, Assistant Director of Athletics and Gym- 
nastics. 

Graduate, Sargent Normal School of Physical Education, Boston, Mass., 1908. 
Student, Gilbert Summer Normal School of Classic Dancing, 1908; Instructor in 
Gymnastics, Playgrounds, Cambridge, Mass., Summer, 190?, 1909. 

Mary Ellen Baker, A.B., B.L.S., Head Cataloguer. 

A.B., Lincoln University, 1900. B.L.S., New York State Library School, 1908. 
Assistant in Latin, Missouri Valley College, 1901-05, and Librarian, 1902-06. Illinois 
State Library School, 1906-07; New York State Library School, 1907-08. 

Bessie Homer Jennings, Assistant Cataloguer. 

Graduate, Drexel Institute Library School, 1900. 

Mary Warren Taylor, Secretary to the Department of Athletics and 

Gymnastics. 
Thomas F. Branson, M.D., Physician in Chief. 

A.B., Haverford College, 1889; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1892. Attending 
Physician, Bryn Mawr Hospital. 

Marianna Taylor, M.D., Assistant Physician. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903, and M.D., Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 
1908. Resident Physician, Woman's Hospital, Philadelphia, 1908-09, and Clinical 
Instructor, 1910-11;' Practicing Physician, St. David's, Pa., 1910-11. 

Helen Murphy, M.D., Examining Oculist. 

M.D., Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1893; Assistant Demonstrator in 
Histology, Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1S94-96; Instructor in Materia 
Medica, 1896-1902; Instructor in Diseases of the Eye, Philadelphia Polyclinic and 
College for Graduates in Medicine, 1895-97. 



XI 

The following physicians have consented to serve as consultant* 
in special cases: 

Ella B. Everitt, M.D., 1807 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Consultant 
Gynecologist. 

John H. Musser, M.D., 1927 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Consultant 
Physician. 

George de Schweinitz, M.D., 1705 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Con- 
sultant Oculist. 

Robert G. Le Conte, M.D., 1625 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Consultant 
Surgeon. 

Francis R. Packard, M.D.. 304 S. Nineteenth Street, Philadelphia, 
Consrdtant Aurist and Laryngologist. 

James K. Young, M.D., 222 S. Sixteenth Street, Philadelphia, Con- 
sultant Orthopaedist. 



The Academic Committee of the Alumnce. 

Elizabeth Winsor Pearson, A.B., (Mrs. Henry Greenleaf Pearson), 

Chairman, Dudley Road, Newton Centre, Mass. 
Louise Brownell Saunders, A.B. (Mrs. Arthur Percy Saunders). 

Clinton, N. Y. 
Helen J. Robins, A.B. {Secretary), 23 Gowen Avenue, Mt. Airy, 

Philadelphia. 
Susan Fowler, A.B. (ex-offi,cio), 420 West USth Street, New York City. 
Bertha Haven Putnam, Ph.D., Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, 

Mass. 
Gertrude Elizabeth Dietrich Smith, A.B. (Mrs. Herbert Knox 

Smith), Cathedral Avenue and Woodley Lane, Washington, D. C. 
Nellie Neilson, Ph.D., Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass. 
Frances Amelia Fincke, A.M., (Mrs. Learned Hand), 142 East 65th 

Street, New York City. 



Report' of the Recording Dean and Assistant to the 

President. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit to you a statistical report on 
the students of Bryn Mawr College for the academic year 
1910-11, a statistical report of the workings of the regulations 
of the directors and faculty, and an account of matters which 
were administered through my office. 

The entire number of students enrolled during the year was 
426. There were 84 graduate students, including fellows. 
The number of graduate students was as usual about 20 per 
cent of the whole number of students. 

I. Comparative Table of Number of Graduate and, Under- 
graduate Students from 1885 to 1911. 



Year. 


Under- 
Graduate graduate 
Students. Students. 


Total 

Number. 


Year. 


Graduate 
Students. 


Under- 
graduate 
Students. 


Total 
Number 


1885-86. 


. ... 8 


36 


44 


1898-99 . . 


... 67 


287 


354 


1886-87 . 


. . . . 10 


54 


64 


1899-1900 


... 53 


334 


387 


1887-88 . 


8 


70 


78 


1900-01 . . 


. .. 48 


348 


396 


1888-89 . 


. . . . 16 


100 


116 


1901-02 . . 


.. . 53 


383 


436 


1889-90 . 


22 


100 


122 


1902-03 . . 


...70 


377 


447 


1890-91 . 


12 


120 


132 


1903-04 . . 


... 62 


384 


446 


1891-92 . 


27 


142 


169 


1904-05 . . 


... 63 


378 


441 


1892-93 . 


.... 34 


168 


202 


1905-06 . . 


... 79 


377 


456 


1893-94 . 


. . . . 43 


200 


243 


1906-07 . . 


... 75 


362 


437 


1894-95 . 


.... 49 


234 


283 


1907-08 . . 


... 72 


348 


420 


1895-96 . 


.... 52 


246 


298 


1908-09 . , 


... 86 


334 


420 


1896-97 . 


.... 46 


243 


289 


1909-10. . 


... 87 


337 


424 


1897-98 . 


.... 49 


275 


324 


1910-11. 


... 84 


342 


426 



Statistics of Graduate Students in 1910-11. 
II. Geographical Distribution of Graduate Students. 

The 84 graduate students enrolled during the year came 
from the following states and countries: 

State Number of State Number of 

or Country. Students. Percentage. or Country. Students. Percentage. 

Pennsylvania 27 32.14 New York 5 5.95 

Kansas 6 7.14 New Jersey 4 4.76 

(1) 



State Number of 

or Country. Students. Percentage. 

Ohio 4 4.76 

Connecticut 3 3.57 

Illinois 3 3.57 

Massachusetts 3 3.57 

Missouri 3 3.57 

Indiana 2 2.38 

Michigan 2 2.38 

Mississippi 2 2.38 

Rhode Island 2 2.38 

Colorado 1 1.19 

Delaware 1 1.19 



State Number of 

or Country. Students. Percentage. 

Iowa 1 1.19 

Maryland 1 1.19 

Nebraska 1 1.19 

North Carolina 1 1.19 

West Virginia 1 1.19 

England 6 7.14 

Canada 3 3.57 

Germany 1 1.19 

Ireland 1 1.19 

84 100.00 



These 84 graduate students may be classified as follows: 

Non-resident, holding European fellowships and studying abroad 6 

Resident fellows 11 

Fellows by courtesy 7 

Graduate scholars, British 4 

Graduate scholars, German 1 

Graduate scholars 17 

Members of college staff 7 

Graduate students 31 



84 



Of the 84 graduate students 55 lived in the halls of resi- 
dence, 23 lived in Philadelphia or the neighborhood, and 6 
were studying abroad. 



///. Denominational Affiliations of Graduate Students. 



Episcopalian 25 

Presbyterian 21 

Congregational 7 

Friends 5 

Methodist 4 

Lutheran 4 

Baptist 2 

Roman Catholic 2 

German Reformed 2 

Unitarian 1 

Jewish 1 



Reformed Episcopal 1 

Church of Christ 1 

Reformed Church of the United 

States 1 

Moravian 1 

Disciples 1 

No denominational affiliation ... 1 

Not stated 4 



84 



IV. Number of Years of Graduate Study. 



In first year of graduate study, 42 

In second " " " 13 

In third " " " " 16 

In fourth " " " " 6 

In fifth " " " " 3 



In sixth year of graduate study, 1 

In seventh " " " "1 

In eighth " " " " 1 

In ninth " " " " 1 



84 



V. Studies Elected by 78 Graduate Students in Residence. 

Under each subject all the graduate students attending 
courses in that subject are counted. 



Students 

English 21. 

Mathematics 16 . 

Latin 14. 

French 12 . 

Physics 12. 

German 10 . 

History 10. 

Greek 9 . 

Art 9 . 

Philosophy and 

Psychology 9 . 

Biology 6 . 



Percentage 

of Number 

of Graduate 

Students. 


Students. 


. . . 26.9 


Economics 6 . . 




20.5 


Chemistry 5 . . 




18.0 


Biblical Literature 




15.4 


and Semitic 




15.4 


Languages 4 . . 




12.8 


Geology 3 . . 




12.8 


Teutonic Philology. 3 . . 




11.5 


Comparative Lit- 




11.5 


erature 2 . . 




Italian 2 . . 


... 11.5 


Education 2 . . 




7.7 


Spanish 1 . . 



Percentage 

of Number 

of Graduate 

Students. 

.. 7.7 

. . 6.4 



5.1 

3.8 
3.8 

2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
1.3 



VI. Major Studies of ,78 Graduate Students in Residence. 

Each student entered under a subject is doing full graduate 
work and devoting half or more of her working time to the 
study of that special subject. 

English 9 History 4 

Latin 7 Biology 3 

Mathematics 6 German and Teutonic Philology 2 

Greek 5 French 2 

Chemistry 5 Physics 2 

Philosophy and Psychology .... 5 



VII. Occupations of 84 Graduate Students. 

Of the 84 graduate students 39 have already taught or are 
teaching, and 15 of these have taught, assisted or demonstrated 



in colleges and universities; 2 are librarians, 1 is a social worker, 

I a college warden. The remaining 41 have held no position, 
16 of these intend to teach, 2 are married, 1 intends to study 
medicine, 3 plan to be scientific research workers, 1 to be a 
missionary, 1 to be a public lecturer, 1 to be a social worker, 

II to have no special occupation, 5 have not stated their plans. 

VIII. Examinations for Higher Degrees. 

At Commencement, June 1911, the degree of Master of 
Arts was conferred on 6 graduate students, belonging to the 
following classes : 

Class of 1904, 1; Class of 1906, 1; Class of 1908, 1; Class of 
1910, 3. The principal subjects of study were Latin 1, history 
1, mathematics 1, philosophy and psychology 3. 

• During the year 5 graduate students presented themselves 
for examination for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The 
candidates were graduates of the following colleges and univer- 
sities: Bryn Ma wr College, 1; Cornell University, 1; Missis- 
sippi State College for Women, 1; Washington University, 1; 
Woman's College of Baltimore, 1. The major subjects of the 
candidates were Latin 1, English philology 2, history 1, 
psychology, 1. 

Statistics of LTndergraduate Students in 1910-11. 

IX. Geographical Distribution of Undergraduate Students. 

The 342 undergraduate students enrolled during the past 
year came from the following states and countries : 

Students. Percentage. Students. Percentage. 

Pennsylvania 107 31.3 Texas 4 1.2 

New York 56 16.4 Virginia 4 1.2 

Illinois 43 12.6 Delaware 3 .9 

Massachusetts 24 7.0 New Hampshire. . . . 3 .9 

Maryland 23 6.7 Oregon 3 .9 

New Jersey 16 4.7 Rhode Island 3 .9 

Ohio 7 2.1 Alabama 2 .6 

Connecticut 5 1.5 District of Columbia 2 .6 

Indiana 5 1.5 Minnesota .' 2 .6 

Missouri 5 1.5 Nebraska 2 .6 

Wisconsin 5 1.5 Arkansas 1 .3 



California . . 
Georgia. . . . 

Iowa 

Kentucky . . 
Louisiana. . 

Maine 

Michigan . . 
Mississippi . 
Tennessee . . 



Students. Percentage. 

.3 
.3 
.3 
.3 
.3 
.3 
.3 
.3 
.3 



Students. Percentage. 

Hawaii. 1 -3 

England 2 .6 

France 1 -3 

Japan 2 .6 

Turkey 1 -3 

Canada 1 -3 



342 100.0 



These 342 undergraduate students are classified as follows : 
325 resident, 17 non-resident; 338 were candidates for a 
degree, 4 were hearers. Of the 338 candidates for a degree 
62 were seniors of whom 58 graduated in June, 1 graduated in 
February and 3 did not complete the work for a degree; 69 
were juniors, 91 were sophomores, and 116 were freshmen. 

In addition to those who graduated 46 undergraduate 
students left the college, 5 during the year and 41 at its close, 
for the following reasons: 

During the Year: 

On account of illness 3 

On account of death of her mother 1 

To be married 1 

— 5 
At the end of the year: 

On account of illness 6 

Came for one or two years only 9 

To be married 1 

To travel 4 

To go into society 4 

On account of financial reasons 3 

To study physical culture 1 

To graduate at a college nearer home 2 

To return to college formerly attended 1 

Needed at home 3 

Not stated, probably low grades 5 

Not stated 2 

— 41 

Total 46 

The students who left were members of the following 
classes: juniors 6, sophomores 23, freshmen 17. 



6 



A'. Denominational Affiliations of Undergraduate Students in 

1910-11. 

Episcopalian 128 Dutch Reformed 3 

Presbyterian 88 Evangelical 2 

Unitarian 24 Swedenborgian 2 

Congregational 14 Lutheran 1 

Jewish 14 Jewish Reformed 1 

Methodist 13 Ethical Culture 1 

Friends 11 No denominational affiliation ... 9 

Baptists 10 Not stated 3 

Roman Catholic 9 

Christian Science 6 342 

German Reformed 3 



Statistics of Senior Class (Class of 1911). 

At Commencement, June, 1911, the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts was conferred on 59 students, one of whom completed the 
requirements in February, 1911. The courses may be analyzed 
as follows: 

XI. Length of Course of Senior Class. 

Number 
Length of Graduated 
Date of Entering College. Course. in 1911. 

October, 1907 4 years 55 

October, 1906 5 years 2 

October, 1906 4 years 1* 

October, 1905 4 years 1 1 

Of the 94 students who entered the college in October, 1907, 
55 or 58.5 per cent have therefore graduated after the regular 
four year course. 

XII. Age of Senior Class. 

Class graduating in June, 1911: 

Average age 22 years, 1.9 months 

Median age 22 years, 1 month 

Class graduating in February, 1911: 

Average age 21 years, 9.5 months 

Median age 21 years, 9.5 months 



* Out of college for one semester. Completed woik for degree in February, 1911. 
t Out of college for two years. 



The average age at graduation of the classes since 1907 is 
as follows: 

1907 22 years, 7.6 months 

1908 22 years, 6.6 months 

1909 22 years, 8.0 months 

1910 22 years, 7.4 months 

XIII. Groups Elected by the Senior Class. 

History and Economics and French and Spanish 2 

Politics 15 Economics and Politics and 

Greek and Latin 7 Philosophy 2 

Latin and French 5 Mathematics and Geology 2 

Latin and English 4 Mathematics and Chemistry . . . 

Latin and German. 3 English and German 

English and Philosophy 3 English and French 

German and French 3 Physics and Geology 

Mathematics and Physics 3 Physics and Biology 

Physics and Chemistry 3 

Greek and English 2 59 

Arranged in order the major subjects chosen are as follows: 

Latin 19 Mathematics 6 

Economics and Politics 17 Philosophy 5 

History 15 Geology 3 

English 11 Chemistry 4 

French 11 Spanish 2 

Greek 9 Biology 1 

Physics 8 

German 7 118 

Results of Oral Examinations in French and German 
Translation, Class of 1911. 

French. German. 

First Examination. Number. Per cent. Number. Per cent. 

High Credit 1 2.17 

Credit 4 8.69 2 4.65 

Merit 6 13.04 6 13.95 

Passed 20 43.48 21 48.83 

Failed 15 32.60 14 32.55 

Total 46 43 

Second Examination. 

Merit 1 3.73 1 3.44 

Passed 17 62.96 17 58.62 

Failed 9 33.33 11 37.93 

Total 27 29 



French. German. 

Third Examination. Number. Percent. Number. Percent. 

Passed 7 63.63 5 38.46 

Failed 4 36.36 8 61.53 

Total 11 

-Fourth Examination. 

Passed 3 100 8 100 



Statistics of the Freshman Class (Class of 1914). 

The freshman class numbered 115; 110 entered on exami- 
nation and 5 on honorable dismissal from other colleges or 
universities; 108 lived in the halls of residence and 7 lived at 
home. No freshman entered in February, 1911. 

XIV . Conditions of Freshman Class. 

Number Percentage. 

Clear 53 48.18 

Clear except for punctuation or spelling 59 53.63 

Conditioned in 1 section 9 8.18 

Conditioned in 2 sections 9 8.18 

Conditioned in 3 sections 17 15.45 

Conditioned in 4 sections 8 7.27 

Conditioned in 5 sections 8 7.27 

110 
Honorable dismissal from other colleges 5 

115 

Freshmen conditioned in spelling 7, conditioned in punc- 
tuation, 27; freshmen entering on examination with no con- 
dition except in punctuation or spelling, 53.63 per cent. 

XV. Comparative Table of Percentage of Freshmen Entering 

Without Matriculation Conditions, October, 1890 — 

October, 1910. 

This table includes only those entering in October of 
each year and takes no account of conditions in punctuation 
and spelling. Up to 1897 the proportion of students entering 
free from conditions to all the entering students, including 
honorable dismissal students, was taken. After 1897 the 



students who entered on honorable dismissal were not counted 
in taking the percentage. It is therefore misleading to com- 
pare the two sets of percentages. 

In 1890 25.0 % In 1901 40.52% 

In 1891 22.8 % In 1902 37.97% 

In 1892 32.0 % In 1903 35.29% 

In 1893 23.1 % In 1904 50.00% 

In 1894 19.3 % In 1905 54.81% 

In 1895 19.0 % In 1906 53.48% 

In 1896 21.8 % .In 1907. 56.48% 

In 1897 31.8 % In 1908 66.29% 

In 1898 26.9 % In 1909 53.00% 

In 1899 31.73%, In 1910 53.63% 

In 1900 38.78% 

XVI. Removal of Matriculation Conditions. 

Omitting conditions in punctuation and spelling, 84 con- 
ditions were incurred of which 46 were passed off during the 
college year as follows: 

12 were passed off in November, 1910 

3 were passed off in February, 1911 

6 were passed off in April, 1911 

9 were passed off in May, 1911 
16 were passed off in September, 1911 

Thirty-eight were not passed off before the beginning of the 
sophomore year. Nine students with entrance conditions not 
passed off left college during or at the close of their freshman 
year. 

XVII. Table of Preparatory Schools that Prepared 
110 Freshmen. 

Arranged according to sections of country in which the 
college offers matriculation scholarships. Three Freshmen 
entered by honorable dismissal from other colleges. 

New England States: 

Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn 11 

The Winsor School, Boston, Mass 4 

Miss Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston, Mass .... 2 

The Misses May's School, Boston, Mass 2 

Miss Wheeler's School, Providence, R. 1 2 



10 



The High School, Brookline, Mass 

The High School, Concord, N. H 

Dana Hall, Wellesley, Mass 

The Misses Ely's School, Greenwich, Conn. 

The High School, Fitchburg, Mass 

The High School, Hartford, Conn 

Miss Kelly's School, Cambridge, Mass 



28 

First Matriculation Scholarship won by pupil of Miss 
Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston, Mass.; second Matri- 
culation Scholarship won by pupil of Rosemary Hall, Green- 
wich, Conn. 

New York, New Jersey and Delaware: 

Miss Fine's School, Princeton, N.J 2 

The Veltin School, New York City. . . .- 2 

The High School, Asbury Park, N. J 

Brooklyn Heights Seminary, New York City 

The Charlton School, New York City 

The Dearborn-Morgan School, Orange, N. J 

The Friends' School, Wilmington, Del 

The Misses Hebb's School, Wilmington, Del 

Hoboken Academy, Hoboken, N. J 

The Kimberley School, Montclair, N. J 

The Misses Rayson's School, New York City 

St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y 

The Brearley School, New York City 



15 

First and second matriculation scholarships won by pupils 
of Miss Fine's School, Princeton, N. J. 

Western States: 

The University School for Girls, Chicago, 111 3 

The Chicago Latin School, Chicago, 111 

The College Preparatory School, Cincinnati, O 

Columbus School for Girls, Columbus, O 

The High School, Evanston, 111 

The High School, Fort Wayne, Ind 

Mary Institute, St. Louis, Mo 

The High School, St. Charles, Mo 

The Bishop's School, San Diego, Cal 



11 



11 

First matriculation scholarship won by pupil of the Univer- 
sit}^ School for Girls, 'Chicago; second matriculation scholar- 
ship won by pupil of the Chicago Latin School, Chicago. 
Pennsylvania and Southern States: 

The Girls' High School, Philadelphia 11 

The Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md 9 

The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 6 

The Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 6 

The Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 6 

Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 3 

The Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa 2 

The Stevens School, Germantown, Philadelphia 2 

The Wilkes-Barre Institute, Wilkes-Barre, Pa 2 

The Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia 

The High School, Butler, Pa 

The Central High School, Washington, D. C 

The Friends' Select School, Philadelphia 

The Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa 

The High School, WiLkinsburg, Pa 

The Winchester School, Pittsburgh, Pa 

The High School, Edgbaston, Birmingham, England. . . . 

Miss White's School, Paris, France 

56 

First and second matriculation scholarships won by pupils 
of the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 
Admitted on Honorable Dismissal: 

Radcliffe College 2 

Barnard College 1 

University of Chicago 1 

Northwestern University 1 

~5 

Preparation Received in Private or Public Schools: 

Number. Per cent. 

Private schools 70 63.6 

Private schools and private tuition 7 6.4 

Public schools 19 17.3 

Public schools and private tuition 8 7.3 

Private and public schools 5 4.5 

Private and public schools and private tuition . . 1 .9 

110 100.00 
The percentage of freshmen entering by examination who 
have received preparation for college only in private schools 
or by private tuition equals 70; the percentage of those who 
tudied only in public schools is 17.3, 



12 



XVII. A Comparative Table of the Geographical Distribution 
of the Freshman Class, 1904 to 1910. 



States and Countries. 



Pennsylvania. . 
New York. . . . 

Illinois 

Maryland. . . . 
Massachusetts . 
New Jersey . . . 
Ohio 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Florida 

Georgia 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

North Carolina 

Oregon 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Virginia . . . 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Per cent of Freshman Classes in 



1904. 1905. I 1906. 1907. 1908 



35.4 

16.7 
6.3 
2.1 
4.2 
2.1 
3.1 



2.1 

2.1 
1.0 



2.1 
2.1 



3.1 
3.1 
1.0 



1.0 



2.1 



France . . 
Hawaii. . 
Japan. . . 
England . 
Canada . 



2.1 
3.1 
2.1 



1.0 
1.0 
1.0 



33.0 
18.2 
10.6 
3.2 
7.4 
4.4 
5.3 



1.1 
1.1 

2.2 



1.1 
1.1 



2.2 



1.1 
1.1 

2.2 



1.1 
1.1 



1.1 
1.1 



1.1 



29.2 
17.7 
13.5 
4.2 
6.3 
3.1 
3.1 



1.0 
1.0 

1.0 
2.1 



1.0 
1.0 



1.0 



1.0 

3.1 
1.0 
2.1 

1:0 

1.0 

1.0 

2.1 
2.1 



27.7 
16.0 
14.9 
9.6 
1.1 
1.1 
3.2 



1.1 

1.1 
2.2 

1.1 

1.1 

2.2 

1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 

2.2 
1.1 

1.1 



1909. 



1.1 



1.1 
3.2 



1.1 

1.1 
1.1 



35.9 
18.9 
9.0 
5.0 
7.0 
4.0 
2.0 

2.0 



2.0 
1.0 
1.0 

L0 



1.0 



1.0 
2.0 

2.0 



1.0 
L0 



3.0 
1.0 



1.0 i 

1.0 

1.0 I 



In 1910, 18 states, the District of Columbia, and England 
are represented. 



13 



XIX. Denominational Affiliations of the Freshman Class. 



Presbyterian 37 

Episcopalian 36 

Unitarian 9 

Methodist 7 

Jewish 5 

Congregationalist 3 

Friends 3 

New Church (Swedenborgian) . . 2 

Roman Catholic 2 



Evangelical 

Christian Scientist 

Dutch Reformed 

German Reformed 

Lutheran 

Not stated 6 

115 



XX. Average and Median Age of the Freshman Class. 

Years. Months. 

Average age of the class entering in October 18 6 

Median age of the class entering in October 18 5 

Average age (excluding honorable dismissal students) . . 18 5 
Median age (excluding honorable dismissal students) ... 18 3 



XXI. 


Average Ages of Entering Classes Since 


1885. 


1 

Year. Average Age. 


Median Age. 


Year. 


Average Age. 


Median Age. 


1885 


22.03 


18.87 


1898 


19.08 


19.58 


1886 


18.31 


18.00 


1899 


18.75 


18.58 


1887 


19.24 


. 19.00 


1900 


19.00 


18.91 


1888 


19.02 


18.20 


1901 


18.58 


18.58 


1889 


19.19 


18.10 


1902 


18.83 


18.62 


1890 


19.35 


18.11 


1903 


18.50 


18.50 


1891 


19.46 


18.07* 


1904 


18.92 


18.92 


1892 


19.54 


18.11 


1905 


18.66 


18.66 


1893 


19.78 


19.00 


1906 


18.75 


18.50 


1894 


19.28 


19.01 


1907 


18.66 


18.33 


1895 


19.44 


18.08 


1908 


18.50 


18.33 


1896 


18.97 


18.10 


1909 


18.58 


18.58 


1897 


18.90 


18.75 


1910 


18.50 


18.42 



XXII. Occupations of Parents of the Freshman Class. 

Professions: 

Lawyers (1 Judge) * 16 

Teachers (2 College Presidents, 1 Dean) 8 

Physicians (1 Surgeon) 6 

Technical Engineers 6 

Clergymen 4 

Architects 3 

Actor 1 

Consul 1 

Naval Officer 1 

— 46 



14 

Business: 

Business Managers, Officials and Employees 20 

Merchants 15 

Stock Brokers, Bond and Mortgage Brokers and Com- 
mission Merchants 10 

Manufacturers 10 

Bankers 4 

Insurance 3 

Publishers 2 

Advertiser 1 

Auditor 1 

Real Estate Dealer 1 

Farmers 2 

— 69 

115 

Working of the Merit Law. 

Two students originally of the class of 1910 remained on 
probation during 1910-11 and graduated in June, 1911. No 
students were reported as coming under the five year rule in 
February, 1911. In June, 1911, one student of the class of 
1912 received grades which gave her more than 60 hours below 
merit and was excluded from a degree. Five other students of 
the class of 1912 were placed on probation on the results of 
the spring examination and 2 of these have left the college. 

Since the five year rule came into operation for the class 
of 1907, 30 students have been placed on probation; of these 
9 have graduated, 3 have been excluded from a degree, 15 have 
left the college and 3 remain on probation. In the five classes, 
1907, 1908, 1909, 1910 and 1911, 350 students have graduated. 
The number of students placed on probation forms nearly 9 
per cent of these classes, about 4.5 per cent have probably 
left the college on account of being placed on probation, and 
about 1 per cent have been excluded from a degree. 

In June, 1911, 33 freshmen and 17 sophomores had received 
examination grades below merit in more than half their hours. 
Of these, 29 freshmen and 10 sophomores have returned for 
the year 1911-12 and are consequently unable to take part 
in any college entertainments requiring preparation, to serve as 
officers of any clubs or associations or to hold paid college 
positions. 



15 

Registration of Attendance on the First Day of each Semester and 
Before and After Vacations. 

Students are required under penalty of having some of their 
examinations deferred to register 8 times in the college year as 
shown by the following table; this registration is prescribed in 
order to ensure regular attendance before and after the vaca- 
tions. 

XXIII. Table of Cases of Failure to Register. 

Number failing to register: 
Excuse, Excuse judged Excuse judged 
illness. adequate. inadequate. 

Beginning of the college year 3 1 2 

Before the Thanksgiving vacation. .12 2 

After the Thanksgiving vacation ... 10 14* 

Before the Christmas vacation 18 1 5 

After the Christmas vacation 11 39 f 1 

Beginning of the second semester. .9 1 

Before the Easter vacation Registration not 

After the Easter vacation required. 

Total 63 58 8 



Fines. 

Fines are imposed for failure to register courses in the 
appointed period, and for failure to return course books to 
the office fully signed at the required time at the end of each 
semester. 

In the first semester 8 students and in the second semester 
6 students did not register their courses during the appointed 
period and were fined $70. Course books were handed in late 
by 6 students who were fined $30. A fee of one dollar is charged 
for each change a student makes in her course after she has 
definitely registered it. Sixty-five students made such changes 
in their courses and were fined $85. The above fines amounting 
to $185 were expended for books for the college library. 



* 12 of these were on trains delayed by storms, 
t 37 of these were on trains delayed by storms. 



16 

College Publications. 

The College has issued during the year 1910-11 the follow- 
ing publications : 

Bryn Mawr College Calendar. 

Academic Buildings and Halls of Residence, Plans and 
Descriptions. Volume III, Part 4. pp. 42. Novem- 
ber, 1910. 

Register of Alumnae and Former Students. Volume 
IV, Part 1. pp. 280. January, 1911. 

Graduate Courses. Volume IV, Part 2. pp. 125. March, 
1911. 

Undergraduate and Graduate Courses. Volume IV, 
Part 3. pp.186. 2 inserts. May, 1911. 

Supplement, Competitive Matriculation Scholarships, pp. 
10. November, 1910. 
Bryn Mawr College Finding List. pp. 34. November 1, 1910. 
Bryn Mawr College Class Lists, First Semester. pp. 25. 

December 5, 1910. 
Bryn Mawr College Class Lists, Second Semester, pp. 25. 

March 15, 1911. 
Bryn Mawr College Twenty-fifth Anniversary, October 21 

and 22, 1910. pp. 64. February, 1910. 
Bryn Mawr College Monographs, Monograph Series, Vol. 

VIII. The Egyptian Elements in the Legend of the 

Body and Soul, by Louise Dudley, pp. xi, 179. Bryn 

Mawr, Pa., August, 1911. 
Bryn Mawr College Monographs, Monograph Series, Vol. IX. 

The Legend of Longinus in Ecclesiastical Tradition and in 

English Literature, and its Connection with the Grail, by 

Rose Jeffries Peebles, Bryn Mawr, Pa., September, 1911. 
Bryn Mawr College, Annual Report of the President, 1909-10. 

pp. 148. December 18, 1910. 
Bryn Mawr College, Pamphlet of Matriculation Examination 

Papers, Spring, 1911. 
Bryn Mawr College, Pamphlet of Matriculation Examination 

Papers, Autumn, 1911. 
Circulars in regard to Fellowships and Scholarships. 
Miscellaneous Circulars, Notices, Blanks, etc. 



17 

Not published through the publisher's office: 

Bryn Mawr College, Financial Report, pp. 28. Novem- 
ber, 1910. 

Summary of the Account of the Treasurer of the Trustees of 
Bryn Mawr College for the year ending ninth month 
30, 1910. pp. 13. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Isabel Maddison, 
Recording Dean and Assistant to the President. 



Report of the Dean of the College. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to present the following report for the 
academic year 1910-11. A number of changes were made 
in the work of the office for the year. The tabulation of 
attendance at lectures and of cuts on account of illness was 
transferred from my office and done in the office of the Record- 
ing Secretary, and will be found in the report of the Recording 
Secretary. The work of the Bureau of Appointments which 
has in the past been done in connection with the Recording 
Secretary's office is now done in my office. I have this year 
advised all the undergraduates. The freshmen I saw by ap- 
pointment once a month throughout the year with the exception 
of those students who carried their work so well that in the 
second semester they were excused from advisory appointments. 

Under the new system of quizzes all students who wished 
to be excused from a quiz were required to file a record of 
illness in my office. This increased the reports of illness for the 
year very largely. The college has been very unfortunate 
this year in having a large number of mild cases of contagious 
diseases especially in the second semester. On account of 
three cases of scarlet fever in the infirmary the college was 
compelled to close on March 14th for ten days. This enforced 
vacation was substituted for the usual Easter vacation and the 
work of the semester was not seriously disturbed. I wish to 
mention particularly the cooperation and good will of both 
the faculty and students when they were subjected to great 
personal inconvenience by the sudden closing of the college. 

Record of Illness. 

Semester I. Semester II, 

Number of undergraduate students 340 335 

Number reporting illness 157 193 

Per cent reporting illness 46 . 17 57 . 44 

(18) 



I!) 



Number of Excuses Presented. 

Number of Number of Students. Number of Number of Students. 

Excuses. Sem. I. Sem. II. Excuses. Sem. I. Sem. II. 

1 79 98 7 1 

2 46 59 8 2 

3 18 22 9 1 

4 10 9 19 1* 

5 2 1 

6 1 Total 157 193 

Aggregate number of excuses: 300 in Semester I, 355 in Semester II. 

The details of illnesses are given in the doctor's report for 
the year. 

I have delivered addresses on educational topics before the 
following schools and associations: 

The Jersey City High School, Jersey City; The Home and 
School League, Philadelphia; The Philomathean Society, Phila- 
delphia; The Civic Club, Department of Education, Philadel- 
phia. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Reilly, 

Dean of the College. 



♦This student was excused by her physician, Dr. John H. Musser. 



Report op the Bureau of Appointments. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report on the 
work of the Bureau of Appointments for the academic year 
1910-11. The following positions have been secured through 
the Appointment Bureau: 

Teachers in private schools and in colleges 8 

Tutors and temporary positions 13 

Total number of positions secured 21 

The above positions have been secured by members of the 
following classes: 

Class of 1910 2 

" " 1911 3 

Graduate students 2 

Undergraduates still in college. . 1 

21 

A circular letter has been sent to each of the 156 applicants 
on the list asking her whether she now holds a position satis- 
factory to herself, or for any other reason does not wish her 
name kept on the files as immediately desiring a position. 
By this means the list of applicants has been further reduced to 
44. 

This report and the statistics brought down by Dean 
Reilly to June, 1911, 1 have completed by adding the candidates 
who obtained positions during the months June to September. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Edwards Park, 
Acting Dean of the College. 



lass 


3 of 1902 


1 


tt 


" 1903 


1 


it 


" 1905 


1 


n 


" 1906 


3 


a 


" 1907 


1 


tt 


" 1908 


4 


a 


" 1909 


2 



(20) 



Report of the Secretary of the College. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to present the following report for the 
academic year 1910-11. 

Three hundred and seventy-three students were assigned 
to rooms in the halls of residence, November 1, 1910. 

The following table gives the number of resident and non- 
resident students and the number of students in each hall. 



Number of Students, November first, 1910. 





Class of 
1911. 


Class of 
1912. 


Class of 
1913. 


Class of 
1914. 


Graduates. 


Hearers. 


Total. 


Merion 

Radnor 

Denbigh 

Pembroke East . . 
Pembroke West . . 

Rockefeller 

Non-resident .... 





12 
16 
14 
16 

3 


2 
11 
12 
15 

14 

13 

2 


21 
9 
12 
15 
14 
16 
5 


24 
19 
15 
14 
15 
21 
7 




9 

17 

9 

9 

9 

16 


OOOOOOCO 


47 

48 
68 
69 
66 
75 
36 


Total 


61 


69 


92 


115 


69 


3 409 









A change in the plan of assigning rooms to undergrad- 
uates was made this year. Since 1898 one-fourth of the under- 
graduate rooms in each hall have been reserved for each class but 
the two upper classes are always so small in proportion to the 
sophomore and freshman classes that by this arrangement 
it is possible for the seniors and juniors to choose rooms in only 
five of the halls, thus leaving each year one hall with no 
seniors and often one hall also with no juniors. 

Next year a fixed proportion of each class will be in each 
hall, the percentage being as follows: 

Percentage. Percentage 

Merion 15 Pembroke East 18 

Radnor 14 Rockefeller 21 

Denbigh 15 

Pembroke West 17 100 

3 (21) 



22 

The matriculation examinations were held in the spring 
of 1911 in 32 centres as well as at Bryn Mawr College. In 
each centre the examinations were proctored by an alumna 
appointed by the college. 

The numbers of candidates in each centre were as follows : 

Athens 4 Milwaukee 1 

Baltimore , 30 Minneapolis 2 

Boston 17 Munich 2 

Bryn Mawr 97 New York 36 

Catonsville 19 Pittsburgh 7 

Chicago 9 Portland, Ore 1 

Cincinnati 4 Providence 4 

Columbus 5 Richmond 13 

Denver 1 Rochester 1 

Detroit 1 San Francisco 1 

Fond du Lac 8 St. Louis 5 

Greenwich 38 Terre Haute 1 

Helena 1 Washington, Conn 16 

Indianapolis 3 Washington, D. C 1 

London 2 Wilkes-Barre 1 

Los Angeles 1 

Louisville 3 336 

Memphis 1 

Number Per cent 



Candidates taking finals 134 111 82.83 

Candidates taking all 1 1 100.00 

Candidates taking preliminaries. . . 201 152 75.62 

Fifty candidates took the College Entrance Examination 
Board examinations and applied for admission to Bryn Mawr 
College in June, 1911. 

The applications for rooms for students planning to enter 
in the autumn of 1911 exceeded the applications for 1910 by 
thirty, showing that the halls of residence would be filled for 
the year 1911-12. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Anna Bell Lawther, 
Secretary of the College. 



Report of the Recording Secretary. 



To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to make the following report on the 
attendance of students at their lectures during the year 1910-11. 



Record of Attendance. 



Number of cuts 
per student. 



None 

One 

Two 

Three 

Four 

Five 

Six 

Seven 

Eight 

Nine 

Ten 

Eleven 

Twelve 

Thirteen .... 
Fourteen. . . . 

Fifteen 

Sixteen 

Seventeen . . . 
Eighteen .... 
Nineteen. . . . 

Twenty 

Twenty-one . 
Twenty-two . 
Twenty-three . 
Twenty-four. . 
Twenty-five . . 
Twenty-six. . . 
Twenty-seven 
Twenty-eight . 
Twenty-nine . . 

Thirty 

Thirty-one. . . 
Thirty-two . . . 
Thirty-three. . 
Thirty-four. . . 
Thirty-five . . . 
Thirty-six. . . . 
Thirty-seven . . 
Thirty-eight . . 
Thirty-nine . . . 

Forty 

Forty-one . . 
Forty-two. . 
Forty-three . 
Forty-four. . 
Forty-five. . 
Forty-six . . . 
Forty-seven 







Number of 
students 
with cuts. 


students 
with unex- 
cused cuts. 


Sem. 


Sem. 


Sem. 


Sem. 


I. 


II. 


I. 


II. 


12 


6 


17 


9 


16 


7 


18 


9 


15 


6 


20 


10 


12 


7 


23 


10 


12 


4 


18 


12 


26 


15 


32 


23 


23 


12 


27 


21 


26 


10 


28 


16 


15 


9 


17 


12 


15 


12 


18 


22 


8 


15 


10 


12 


13 


14 


15 


8 


15 


16 


11 


26 


11 


15 


17 


19 


14 


9 


14 


12 


7 


9 


7 


16 


10 


8 


3 


11 


7 


15 


8 


16 


10 


7 


3 


10 


5 


7 


1 


5 


5 


17 


2 


11 


2 


5 


4 


4 


5 


7 


3 


5 


1 


ii 




3 


4 


5 


3 


3 


3 


8 




4 


1 


10 


2 


5 


3 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


1 




3 


4 




1 




6 


1 


2 


3 


1 




1 


3 


6 


2 


2 


2 


8 




2 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


4 
2 
1 






1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


i 






1 


3 






2 


1 




1 


1 


i 






' 1 


l 






3 









Number of cuts 
per student. 



Forty-eight 
Forty-nine . 

Fifty 

Fif ty-one . . 
Fifty-two . . 
Fifty-three 
Fifty-four . 
Fifty-five . . 
Fifty-six. . 
Fifty-seven 
Fifty-eight 
Fifty-nine . 

Sixty 

Sixty-one. . 
Sixty-two . . 
Sixty-three. . 
Sixty-four . . . 
Sixty-five. . . . 
Sixty-six .... 
Sixty-seven. . 
Sixty-eight. . 
Sixty-nine. . . 

Seventy 

Seventy-one . 
Seventy-two . 
Seventy-three 
Seventy-four . 
Seventy-five . 
Seventy-six . . 
Seventy-seven 
Seventy-eight 
Seventy-nine. 

Eighty 

Eighty-one. . 
Eighty-two. . 
Eighty-three . 
Eighty-four. . 
Eighty-five. . 
Eighty-six. . . 
Eighty-seven. 
Eighty-eight . 
Eighty-nine . 

Ninety 

Ninety-one . . 
Ninety-two . . 

Total number 
of students . 



Number of 
students 
with cuts. 



Sem. 
I. 



Sem. 
II. 



330 



332 



Number of 

students 

with unex- 

cused cuts. 



Sem. 
I. 



330 



Sem. 
II. 



332 



(23) 



24 



Semester I. Semester II. 

Aggregate number of cuts 4,071 6,095 

Aggregate number of unexcused cuts 2,780 4,048 

Average number of cuts per student 12.3 18.3 

Average number of cuts per student cutting 12.8 18.7 

Average number of unexcused cuts per student 8.4 12.2 

Average number of unexcused cuts per student cutting 8.9 12.6 

Average number of cuts per year per student 30.6 

Average number of cuts per year per student cutting 31.5 

Average number of unexcused cuts per year per student 20.6 

Average number of unexcused cuts per year per student cutting. ... 21.5 



Percentage of Students Cutting. 



Percentage of total number of students. 


Cuts, excused 
and unexcused. 


Unexcused 
Cuts. 


Semes- 
ter I. 


Semes- 
ter II. 


i Semes- 
ter I. 


Semes- 
ter II. 


With no cuts 


3.6 


1.8 


5.1 


2.7 


1 or more, but under 5 cuts 


16.6 


7.2 


23.9 


12.6 


" 5 ' 


<i a i 


10 " 


31.8 


17.4 


36.9 


28.3 


" 10 ' 


ii < i t 


15 " 


18.4 


20.7 


20.3 


23.1 


" 15 ' 


" " ' 


20 " 


11.8 


13.8 


6.6 


17.4 


" 20 ' 


II u ( 


30 " 


9.3 


22.5 


5.4 


12.0 


" 30 ' 


II II 1 


40 " 


4.2 


9.6 


1.5 


3.0 


" 40 ' 


" " ' 


50 " 


3.0 


2.7 




.6 


" 50 " 60 


.6 


1.5 




.3 


" 60 o 
Percentage 




.3 


2.4 










of students wit 


h 10 or more cuts. . 


47.6 


73.2 


33.8 


56.4 



The average number of cuts per student cutting is 31.5 per year or 15.7 
per semester. As the regular number of lectures is 15 per week or 204 in 
the first and 207 in the second semester, that is 411 per year per student, 
a student who has taken 31.5 cuts per year has missed an average of a 
little over one lecture a week throughout the year. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Edith Orlady. 

Recording Secretary. 



Report of the Librarian. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to present the annual report of the work 
of the library for the year ending September 30, 1911. 

The following table shows the additions made from various 
sources, and the total present extent of the library, with a 
statement of the condition of a year ago for purposes of com- 
parison : 

Accessions. 

Number of volumes, October 1, 1910 61,390 

Number of volumes added: 

1909-10. 1910-11. 

By purchase 1,920 1,256 

By binding 603 558 

By gift and exchange 455 456 

By replacement 2 8 

Unknown sources 9 29 

Christian Association ... 5 



Total additions 2,989 2,312 

Volumes withdrawn 147 36 



Net gain 2,842 2,276 



Total volumes, September 30, 1911 : . . . . 63,666 

Maps and charts 98 115 

Pamphlets added* 214 301 

Pamphlets withdrawn 19 25 

Net gain 195 276 

Total volumes, September 30, 1911 63,666 

Total maps and charts 2,094 

Total accessioned pamphlets 2,362 

* These numbers represent catalogued pamphlets only. There is also in the library 
a growing collection of several [thousand pamphlets arranged alphabetically by author. 
Pamphlet* when bound are withdrawn and again accessioned as books. 

(25) 



26 



These accessions are distributed by classes as follows : 

1909-10. 1010-11. 

General works 388 134 

Philosophy 125 169 

Religion 121 193 

• Social Science 423 361 

Philology 143 155 

Science 406 328 

Useful Arts 41 41 

Fine Arts 142 46 

Literature 815 632 

History, etc 385 253 

Total 2,989 2,312 

A list of donors to the library with titles of the books and 
pamphlets presented is appended. Books purchased from the 
gifts of money mentioned later in the financial statement are 
not included in this list or in the table of accessions under the 
head of Gifts and Exchanges, because all such books were 
bought through the library. 

Cataloguing. 

1909-10. 1910-11. 

Titles catalogued 2,126 2,250 

Continuations, etc., added 1,195 1,226 

Cards added to main catalogue 8,136 7,503 

Cards added to departmental catalogues 414 576 

The recataloguing of the following classes has been com- 
pleted: 305-306, 342, 549, 560, 820.6, 849. This includes the 
greater part of the departmental libraries of botany, biology, 
and geology, and practically completes the recataloguing 
of the libraries in Dalton. The books in constitutional history 
and in Provencal and minor romance languages were finished. 
Several long and difficult sets in various classes, passed over in 
previous years, have been sought out and recatalogued. Among 
these are: Bombay Sanskrit series, 46 volumes; the publica- 
tions of the following: Chaucer Society, 140 volumes; Early 
English Text Society, 246 volumes; and the New York State 
Education Department. All these sets were fully analyzed, 
and the addition to the catalogue was considerable. 

As the cataloguing staff has remained the same during the 
year, the increased amount of work was made possible by the 



27 

addition of a typewriter to the library equipment. Practically 
all cataloguing is now done either by the use of printed cards 
from the Library of Congress or by the typewriter. Subject 
reference cards, also many series cards, and cards bearing con- 
tents are being rewritten on the typewriter for the sake of the 
added clearness. 

Heretofore, merely the call number of the book has been 
written on the book cards. For convenience in tracing books 
when out of the library a brief author and title entry is now 
being entered. New guide cards for the main catalogue are 
also being made ; likewise a systematic revision of cards already 
filed is being carried on by the head cataloguer. 

Binding. 

Volumes at binderies, October 1, 1910 44 

Volumes sent to B. S. Dougherty 674 

Volumes sent to C. W. O'Connor 365 

Volumes at binderies September 30, 1911 136 

Total bound during the year 947 

Circulation. 

1909-10 1910-11 

October 3,872 2,843 

November 1,866 2,017 

December 1,343 1,280 

January 1,831 1,841 

February 2,305 2,218 

March 1,892 1,648 

April 2,278 1,779 

May 1,695 1,720 

June 739 

Total 17,082 16,085 

The number of volumes taken from the main library 
remains practically the same from year to year; the increased 
use of the library appearing in the growing attendance in the 
reading room, and more especially in the reference room. 
During the past year for the first time the attendant at the loan 
desk has been trained in library methods and is able to assist 
in real reference work. This, with the increase in required 
reading felt in the reserved book room, marks a substantial 
growth in the use of the library which is not reducible to statis- 
tics, nor definite statements for comparison. The change in 



28 

the location of the loan desk has added much to the facility 
of the work. 

Of the 342 undergraduate students whose names appear 
in the Calendar, only 222 are registered in the library. Of 
the 69 resident graduate students, 56 are registered in the main 
library, though doubtless others are using the departmental 
libraries. 

Financial Statement. 

The sums available for the purchase of books, periodicals, 
binding and general supplies during the past year have been as 
follows: 

From the Library appropriation apportioned as follows : 

Biology $150.00 

Chemistry 150.00 

Economics 150.00 

English 150.00 

French 150.00 

Geology 110.00 

German 150.00 

Greek 150.00 

History 150.00 

Latin 150.00 

Mathematics 150.00 

Philosophy 150.00 

Physics 150.00 

Psychology 150.00 

Reference books 50.00 

Religious books 25.00 

General literature 75.00 

Library expenses 790.00 

Total $3,000.00 

From fees paid by students as fines and for deferred and 
condition examinations : 

Regular. 

Art $100.00 

Botany 50.00 

Comparative Literature 150.00 

Education 50.00 

Italian 75.00 

International Catalogue 100.00 



29 

Special. 

International Catalogue $100.00 

English continuations 150.00 

French (Dr. Schinz) 100.00 

Geology 50.00 

English(Dr. Brown) 200.00 

Comparative Literature (Dr. Hatcher and 

Dr. Upham) 150.00 

Comparative Philology 30.00 

Biology 200.00 

History 200.00 

Reference books 100.00 

Refund on Hall Libraries to Dr. Holbrook 5.10 

Art books to be purchased from Dr. Ransom . . 300.00 

Total $2,110.10 

The income on invested funds: 

Dr. Rhoads Memorial Fund $67.70 

Class of 1902 (devoted to history) ■ 29.46 

Lois M. Wright Memorial Fund 5.43 



From special funds: 

Sale of books, and library fines $363.28 

Hall libraries, students' subscriptions 213.92 

Geology fund 143.71 



Gifts: 

From Miss Garrett for books on the following subjects: 

Geology $12.00 

English Literature 13.50 

Heredity 50.00 

Italian Art 50.00 

Gothic Architecture 100.00 

Wiener- Vorlegeblatter 319.50 

Comparative Literature (Dr. Hatcher) ....... 200.00 

English Literature (Dr. Upham) 200.00 

Hygiene 3.14 

German Philology 50.00 

President's Office, reference books 14.72 

Total $1,012.86 



30 



From other sources: 



Oriental club $9.25 

Anonymous gift in memory of Jane C. Schoe- 

maker 40.50 

Bequest of Jane C. Schoemaker 150.00 

Miss Abigal C. Dimon (Biology) 10.00 

Professor Rufus M. Jones (Philosophy) 25.00 

Unexpended balances carried over from previous years : 

Professor J. Edmund Wright Memorial Fund. . $44.85 

Mrs. Anna Woerishoffer's gift 30.10 

Spanish books 100.00 

Oriental club 7.00 

From the departmental accounts the following summary 
of expenditures from all sources may be of interest : 

1909-10 1910-11 

Binding $665.39 $744.22 

Continuations 641.18 746.77 

Periodicals 1,659.81 1,542.08 

Books 3,040.86 3,427.54 

Express and postage 61.18 61.31 

Supplies 228.74 300.34 



3,297.16 $6,822.26 



Inter-Library Loans. 

During the past year we have borrowed from other libra- 
ries as follows : 

University of Chicago 1 

Columbia University 16 

Library of Congress 1 

Harvard College 11 

Haverf ord College 2 

Johns Hopkins University 2 

Library Company 29 

University of Pennsylvania 31 

Princeton University 6 

Surgeon General's Library 3 

102 



31 

Books have been lent to other institutions as follows: 

University of Chicago • 2 

Mount Holyoke College 1 

Princeton University 2 

Johns Hopkins University 2 

Swarthmore College 1 

8 
Inventory. 

The biennial inventory should have been taken during the 
past summer. Owing to the difficulty of carrying on this 
exacting work without artificial light, it has been decided to 
postpone the inventory till the Christmas holidays, and to 
take it at this time thereafter, every two years as formerly. 

General Administration. 

The principal change in the library staff during the past 
year has been the appointment of Mrs. Cassandra Updegraff 
Warner to the post of assistant at the loan desk. Mrs. Warner 
is a graduate of the Library School of Drexel Institute; and for 
the first time this important post has had the advantage of a 
trained assistant in charge. The effect on the library generally 
is perceptible. With added facilities have come added calls 
and Mrs. Warner's time has been taxed to the utmost. As 
the library is still without a reference librarian, many of the 
inquiries that naturally would be made in the reference room 
are made at the loan desk. The faculty, as well as the students, 
are depending more and more upon help which the library should 
at all times be able to render, and it is with pleasure that I note 
that the present staff will not long be able to attend to these 
important demands. 

Miss Wagenhurst, who has served the library for some 
ten years, was obliged to take a leave of absence in February 
because of ill health. Miss Josephine Jones, of the class of 1905, 
filled her place for the remainder of the college year, and from 
September 1st, Miss Marian Price, A.B., Vassar College, 1910, 
a graduate of the Library School of the Drexel Institute, 1911, 
has filled the post. 

The student assistants for the year were Pauline Ida 



32 



Clarke, Laura Lawrenson Byrne, Agnes Elizabeth Morrow, 
Rebecca Renshaw Lewis, Elizabeth Henrietta Johnston, and 
Marion Dorothea Clinton. 

In order to attend the conference of the American Library 
Association which met in Pasadena, May 18-25th, the librarian 
was permitted to leave three weeks before commencement. 
The library was in charge of the head cataloguer during that 
time, and I am glad of this opportunity of expressing my obli- 
gation to Miss Baker and to the entire staff for the admirable 
way in which the library was conducted during this rather try- 
ing month. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary L. Jones, 

Librarian. 



33 



Gifts to Bryn Mawr College Library, 1910-11. 
Gifts from Individuals. 

Mr. Allen Arnold: Arnold, Fort Jefferson and its Commander, 1861— 
62. 

Mrs. George W. Bagby: Bagby, The Old Virginia Gentleman and 
Other Sketches. 

Professor George A. Barton: Orientalistische Literaturzeitung, 1909; 
Theologisches Literaturblatt, 1909; Theologisehe Literaturzeitung, 1909; 
Barton, The Heart of the Christian Message. 

Mr. Harry Bateman: Bateman, Report on the History and Present 
State of the Theory of Integral Equations. 

Mrs. C. W. Benedict: Benedict, A Resemblance and Other Stories. 

Miss Cora A. Benneson: Harvard University, Peabody Museum, 
Memoirs, Vol. 4, Pt. 3, Vol. 5, Pts. 1-2; Papers, Vol. 5, Vol. 6, Pt. 1; 
Science; Farabee, Some Customs of the Macheyengas. 

Miss Mary H. Booth: Booth, How to Read Character in Handwriting. 

Professor Carleton F. Brown: A Descriptive Catalogue of the Manu- 
scripts in the Library of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge; Bibliotheca 
Belgica, Vols. 1-2. 

Hon. James Bryce: Memorandum on Some of the Results of Indian 
Administration During the Past Fifty Years of British Rule in India; 
Statement Exhibiting the Moral and Material Progress and Condition 
of India During the Year 1908-09. 

Miss Laura L. Byrne: Gibbons, Faith of Our Fathers. 

Hon. Chauncey M. Depew: Depew, Speech in U. S. Senate, February 
24, 1910; Orations, Addresses and Speeches, Vols. 1-8; Recent Speeches. 

Mr. Edward C. Farnsworth: Farnsworth, St. Helena and Other 
Poems; The Passing of Mary Baker Eddy. 

Mr. Charles F. Coffin: Johnson, Rhoda M. Coffin. 

Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence : Durning-Lawrence, Bacon is Shakes- 
peare. 

Mr. C. B. Fillebrown: A 1911 Single Tax Catechism. 

Dr. Simon Flexner: Carnegie Institution of Washington, Publica- 
tions, Nos. 128, 134, 137, 138. 

Rabbi Solomon Foster: Foster, The Workingman and the Synagogue. 

Miss Florence A. Gragg: Gragg, Study of the Greek Epigram before 
300 B.C. 

Mr. E. N. Hand: The Atom in Chemistry. 

Mr. Raymond T. Hill: La Mule Sanz Frain. 

Mr. D. Blakely Hoar: Gardner, Ancient Athens. 

Professor Richard T. Holbrook: Booth, A Practical Guide for Authors ; 
The Droeshout Portrait of Wm. Shakespeare. 

Mr. Melvin Jameson: Elijah Parish Lovejoy as a Christian. 



34 

Mr. F. Robertson Jones: Proceedings of the 6th Annual Meeting of 
the Board of Casualty and Surety Underwriters, 1909; 23d Convention 
of the International Association of Accident Under writers. 

Mr. Carl A. Kraus: Kraus, Gerhart Hauptmann's Treatment of 
Blank Verse. 

Prof. Theodore de Laguna: de Laguna, Dogmatism and Evolution. 
> Messrs. Lemcke and Buechner: Spemann's Kunst-Kalender, 1911; 
Hinrichs, Halbjahr's Katalog, 1910, Pts. 1-2. 

Mr. Louis Lombard: Lombard, Observations d'un Musicien Ameri- 
cain. 

Due de Loubat: Gerste, Notes sur la Medicine et la Botanique des 
Anciens Mexicains. 

Mr. Richard Ludloff: Ludloff, Argentinische Dichtungen, Bd. 2-3. 

A. C. McClurg and Company: Casson, The History of the Telephone. 

Mr. Douglas C. McMurtrie: McMurtrie, An Example of Non- 
residential Care for Crippled Children. 

Mr. Theodore Marburg: Marburg, Immigration. 

Prof. E. L. Mark: Contributions from the Zoological Laboratory 
of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College, Nos. 191— 
204, 206. 

Mr. Jean Mascart: Mascart, Photographies de la Comete de Halley; 
Mascart, Un Observatoire pres d'un Volcan. 

Messrs. Merck and Co.: E. Merck's Annual Report, Vol. 23. 

Mr. Samuel Moore: Moore, On the Sources of the Old-English Exodus. 

Mr. Charles K. Needham: Krauss, Die Anmuth des Frauenleibes. 

Mr. Charles D. Norton: Norton, George Washington's Plan for the 
City of Washington. 

Mr. Henry L. Owens: Climatic Adaptation Explained by the Valley 
of Eshcol Grape. 

Dr. Charles Peabody: Gazette des Beaux-Arts, 1911. 

Mr. Robert P. Porter: Porter, Dangers of Municipal Trading. 

Rev. Lyman P. Powell: Good Housekeeping, April, 1911. 

Miss Margaret A. Prussing: Tindall, Origin and Government of the 
District of Columbia. 

Dr. Carl C. Rice: Rice, Romance Etymologies. 

Prof. George L. Raymond: Raymond, Education, Art, and Civics. 

Mr. Henry A. Sanders: Sanders, Roman History and Mythology. 

Mrs. Kate M. Scott: In Honor of the National Association of Civil 
War Army Nurses. 

Miss Kate Stephens: Stephens, American Thumb-Prints. 

Dr. Nettie M. Stevens: Archiv fur Entwicklungsmechanic. 

Dr. William M. Stevenson: Stevenson, Der Einfluss des Gautier 
d' Arras auf die Altfranzclsische Kunstepik. 

Mr. Morrison I. Swift: The American House of Lords. 

Mr. Samuel Thorne: Memorial, Phebe Anna Thorne. 

Mr. Hugues Vaganay: L'Astree de Messire Honore D'Urfe. 



35 

Hon. I. P. Wanger: Congressional Record, Vol. 45, Pts. 1-8, and 
Index; Water Supply Papers, Nos. 240, 251, 253, 255, 260; Monthly 
Summary of Commerce and Finance, Sept., 1910; Message of the President, 
Dec. 6, 1910; U. S. Geological Survey Bulletin, Nos. 381, 425-27, 429, 
432-35, 437, 444; Congressional Directory, 61st Congress, 3d Session; 
Washington Observations, 1886; Astronomical Papers, Vol. 2, Pts. 5-6, 
Vol. 3, Pt. 5, Vol. 5, Pts. 1-2, Vol. 6, Pt. 3, Vol. 7, Pt. 4, Vol. 8, Pts. 
1-2; Congressional Record, 61st Session, Pts. 1-5. 

Mrs. Frank S. Wesson: Murray, English Dramatic Companies, 
1558-1642, 2 vols. 

Mr. W. D. Westervelt: Main — A Demi God. 

Mrs. Westmore Willcox: Willcox, A Manual of Spiritual Fortifica- 
tions. 

Miss Mary A. Williams: International Council of Women, Report 
of Transactions, Vols. 1-2. 

Dr. Talcott Williams: California, Board of Railroad Commissioners, 
1880-81-82, 1883-86; Iowa, Board of Railroad Commissioners, Report, 
1882-86, 1897; Massachusetts, Railroad Commissioner, Annual Report, 
1872, 1875-77, 1884-87, 1892-93; Michigan, Railroad Commissioner, 
Report, 1875, 1877, 1878, 1880, 1884-93, 1895; New York, Railroad 
Commissioners, Report, 1883-86; Wisconsin, Railroad Commissioners, 
Report, 1875, 1877; U. S. Statistics Bureau, Treasury Department, Quar- 
terly Report, 1875-78, 1878-79, 1879-87; Beach, Centennial Celebra- 
tions of the State of New York; Heilprin, Explorations of the West Coast 
of Florida; Boynton, The National Military Park; Dieke, Problems of 
Greater Britain; Hunt, Fragments of Revolutionary History; Powell, 
Historic Towns of the Southern States; Dept. of Havana, Military Gover- 
norship of Havana, Annual Report, 1899; New York State Geologist, 
Annual Report, 1893, Vol. 1; Wiley, Roanoke; Calendar of the Corre- 
spondence Relating to the American Revolution; Stern, Jottings of Travel 
in China and Japan; Walton, and Brumbaugh, Stories of Pennsylvania; 
Porter, Commerce and Industries of Japan; New York, Public Service 
Commission, Annual Report, 1908; General Report on the Wages of the 
Manual Labour Classes of the United Kingdom, 1893; Great Britain, 
Report of the Strikes and Lockouts, 1889, 1890, 1891, 1893. 

Dr. Clarence C. Williamson: Official Directory, 61st Congress, 3d 
Session, January, 1911. 

Mrs. W. Hunter Workman: Workman and Workman, The Call 
of the Snowy Hispar. 

Dr. F. W. Wright: Lommel, The Nature of Light. 

Gifts and Exchanges from Institutions, Societies, Etc., 1910-11. 

Academy of Natural Sciences: Proceedings, Vol. 61, Pt. 3, Vol. 62, 
Pts. 1-3, Vol. 63, Pt. 1. 

American Association for Labor Legislation: Proceedings of the 4th 
Annual Meeting. 



36 

American Jewish Historical Society: Publications, Nos. 19-20. 

American Marathi Mission: Report, 1909, 1910. 

American Peace Society: Report of Proceedings of the Second Na- 
tional Peace Congress, Chicago, 1909. 

American Philosophical Society: Transactions, Vol. 22, New Series, 
Pt. 1. 

American Society for the Judicial Settlement of International Dis- 
putes: Baldwin, The New Era of International Courts, Judicial Settle- 
ment, No. 1. 

Argentine Republic: Stock-Breeding and Agriculture in 1908, Mono- 
graphs; Maps. 

Association for International Conciliation: Bulletin, October, 1910- 
September, 1911, Publications, 1910-11. 

Association of American Universities: Journal of Proceedings and 
Addresses, Nos. 3, 5, 12. 

Association of Collegiate Alumnae: Journal, Series 4, Nos. 1-4. 

Association of Life Insurance Presidents: Proceedings of Fourth 
Annual Meeting. 

Bodleian Library: Chancellor's Prize, Latin Verse; Newdigate 
Prize Poem; Gaisford Prize, Greek Verse; Gaisford Prize, Greek Prose; 
Savile, Holy Sepulchre. 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts: Annual Report, 1910; Bulletin, Nos. 
47-52. 

Bowdoin College: Bulletin, No. 22, Pt. 11; Early Days of Church 
and State in Maine; Address and Poem Read at Bowdoin College, June, 
1901. 

British School at Athens: Annual, No. 15. 

Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences: Science Bulletin, Vol. 1, 
No. 14; Index to Science Bulletin, Vol. 1. 

Brown University: Handbook of the John Hay Library in Brown 
University. 

Bryn Mawr Mathematical Journal Club: Papers, Vol. 11. 

California Academy of Sciences: Proceedings, Series 4, Vol. 3, pp. 
57-72; Vcl. 1, pp. 7-288. 

California, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Biennial Report, Vol. 14, 
1909-10. 

University of California: Publications — Pathology, Vol. 2, Nos. 
1-3; Philosophy, Vol. 2, No. 4; Physiology, Vol. 4, Nos. 2-7; Psychology, 
Vol. 1, No. 1; Zoology, Vol. 6, Nos. 12-15, Vol. 7, Nos. 2-8, Vol. 8, Nos. 
1-2, 4-7. 

Canada, Department of Agriculture: Inventory of the Military 
Documents in the Canadian Archives. 

Canada, Department of Mines: Publications, Nos. 59, 68, 1082, 
1093, 1101, 1143, 1006, 1009, 1110, 1137, 1139, 1170; Bulletin, Nos. 4-5; 
Preliminary Report on the Mineral Production of Canada; Annual Report 
on the Mineral Production of Canada, 1909; Mines Branch Bulletin, 
No. 69; Map, No. 9A. 



37 

Canada, Royal Society: Proceedings and Transactions, Series 3, 
Vol. 4. 

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: Annual 
Report, No. 5, 1910; Bulletin, No. 5. 

Carnegie Institution of Washington: Yearbook, No. 9; Publications, 
Vol. 3, Nos. 74, 119, 120, 128, 131-32, 134-39, 141-44, 156, Vol. 4, Nos. 
148, 149, 154; Index to Publications. 

Case Library: Autobiographies, Memoirs, Letters and Journals in 
Case Library. 

Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy: Bulletin, Nos. 6, 7, 12; 
Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy. 

Chicago, United Charities: Open Air Crusaders. 

College Settlements Association: Denison House Report, 1910. 

Colombo Museum: Spolia Zeylanica, Vol. 7, Pts. 24-27. 

Colorado College: Publications, Science Series, Vol. 12, No. 7; Gen- 
eral Series, Nos. 51-52. 

University of Colorado: Studies, Vol. 8, Nos. 1-4. 

Columbia University: Studies in Physiology, Reprints, 1907-09; 
Libraries of Columbia University; University Bibliography, 1910; Disser- 
tations. 

Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences: Transactions, April, 
1911; Memoirs, Vol. 2, July, 1910. 

Connecticut, Factory Inspector: Second Biennial Report, 1908-10. 

Connecticut, State Geological and Natural History Survey: Bulletin, 
No. 16. 

Connecticut, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Twenty-fourth Report, 
1909-10. 

Consumers' League of the City of New York: Report, 1910. 

Cornell University: 21 Dissertations. 

Co-Workers' Fraternity of Boston: Parsons, Legal Doctrine and 
Social Progress. 

Dante Society: Annual Report, No. 28, 1909. 

Daughters of the Revolution: 20th Annual Meeting, 1911. 

Delaware and Hudson Company: Insurance of Stocks and Bonds 
of American Railways, 

Deutsche Bank, Berlin: Annual Report, 1910. 

Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society: Church Calendar of the 
Year of Our Lord, 1911. 

Dublin, Royal Society: Economic Proceedings, Vol. 2, Nos. 1-2; 
Scientific Proceedings, Vol. 13, Nos. 1-10. 

First Church of Christ Scientist, Philadelphia: Wilbur, Life of Mary 
Baker Eddy; The Christian Science Monitor. 

Fidelity and Casualty Company: Memorial of George F. Seward; 
Bulletin, Vol. 16, Nos. 4-7. 

Georgetown University: Crosby, The Advisability of Inserting the 
Word Sex before the Word Race in the 15th Amendment to the Consti- 
tution of the U. S. 

4 



38 

Georgia, Geological Survey: Bulletin, Nos. 24-25. 

University of Georgia: Preliminary Bibliography of Georgia History. 

Ginn and Co. : Suttner, Memoirs of Bertha von Suttrjer, 2 vols. 

Goeteborgs Noegskolas: Aarsskrift, Bd. 15, 1909. 

Greenwich House: Annual Report, 1910. 

University of Groningen: Jaarboek, 1909-10; 7 Dissertations. 

Harvard University Library: Biographical Contributions, No. 59. 

High School Teachers' Association: Articulation of High School and 
College. 

Hudson-Fulton Celebration Committee: The, Hudson-Fulton Cele- 
bration, 1909, Vols. 1, 2. 

Illinois, Geological Survey: Bulletin, Nos. 15-16. 

Illinois, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Cherry Mine Disaster; Annual 
Coal Report, 1910; Annual Report of Free Employment Offices, No. 
11-12; Industrial Accidents, 4th Report. 

Illinois, State Historical Society: Journal, Vol. 3, Nos. 3, 4, Vol. 4, 
Nos. 1-2. 

Illinois, State Historical Library: Collections, Transactions, 1909, 
No. 14. 

Illinois, University: Studies, Vol. 4, No. 1. 

Indiana, University: Studies, Nos. 1-10. 

International Association for Promoting the Study of Quaternions 
and Allied Systems of Mathematics: Bulletin, October, 1910. 

Iowa, Bureau of Labor Statistics: 14th Report. 

Iowa, State Board of Education: First Biennial Report, 1910. 

University of Iowa : Bulletin, Contributions from the Physical Labora- 
tory, Vol. 1, No. 4. 

Japan, Minister of Finance: Financial and Economic Annual of 
Japan, 1908, 1909. 

Jena University: 261 Dissertations. 

John Crerar Library: A List of Books on the History of Science; 
Educational Opportunities in Chicago, 1911. 

Johns Hopkins University: 28 Dissertations. 

Kyoto Imperial University, College of Science and Engineering: 
Memoirs, Vol. 2, Nos. 12-13, 1910. 

Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian: Annual Meeting 
Proceedings, No. 28. 

Lake Mohonk Conference on International Arbitration: Report of 
Annual Meeting, No. 1, 1895, No. 16, 1910, No. 17, 1911. 

Liverpool Biological Society: Proceedings and Transactions, Vol. 24. 

Los Angeles, Report of Auditor for Year ending June 30, 1910. 

Louisiana, State University: Fleming, Ex-Slave Pension Frauds. 

University of Manchester: Publications, Economic Series, No. 13. 

Maryland, Bureau of Statistics: Annual Report, No. 19, 1910. 

Massachusetts, State Board of Charities: Annual Report, No. 32, 
1910. 



39 

Metropolitan Museum of Art: Annual Report, No. 37, 1906, No. 41, 
1910; Bulletin, Vol. 5, No. 10, Vol. 6, No. 10. 

Michigan, Geological and Biological Survey: Publication No. 1, 
Biological Series No. 1; Publication No. 2, Geological Series No. 1; Pub- 
lication No. 3, Geological Series No. 2. 

Michigan, Geological Survey: Annual Report, 1908; Biological 
Survey, 1908. 

Michigan, State Board of Health: Publications, Quarterly Report, 
Vol. 6, Nos. 1-2. 

Michigan, Department of Labor: 2d Annual Report. 

University of Michigan: Moliere, Le Malade Imaginaire; Michigan 
Academy of Science, 12th Report; Meader, Latin Philology; The Coeffi- 
cient of Expansion of Nickel near its Critical Temperature; The Halo of a 
Hundred Years (Feb., 1809-Feb., 1909); Variation in the Pollen Grain of 
Picea Excelsia; Pennington, The Effect of Longitudinal Compression upon 
the Production of Mechanical Tissue in Stems. 

Michigan, Association for the Prevention and Relief of Tuberculosis: 
Annual Report, Second and Third. 

Milwaukee, Bureau of Economy and Efficiency: Bulletin, Nos. 
1-2, 5. 

Missouri, Botanical Garden: Annual Pteport, Vol. 21, 1910. 

Missouri, Bureau of Geology and Mines : Biennial Report of the State 
Geologist. 

University of Missouri: Studies, Philosophy and Education Series, 
Vol. 1, No. 1. 

Munchen, Koniglich Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften: 
Abhandlungen, Mathematisch-physikalische Klasse, Bd. 25, Ab. 1-4; 
Sitzungsberichte, Mathematisch-physikalische Klasse, Jahrgang 1910, 
Ab. 1-4, 6-15, and Schlussheft; Abhandlungen, Philosophisch-philologische 
und historische Klasse, Bd. 25, Ab. 2; Sitzungsberichte, Philosophisch- 
philologische und historische Klasse, Jahrgang 1910, Ab. 1-14, and 
Schlussheft, Jahrgang 1911, Ab. 1-4; Hertling, Wissenschaftliche Richt- 
ungen und Philosophische Probleme ; Riezler, Die Kunstpflege der Wittels- 
bacher; Voigt, Gedachtnissrede von Otto Frank. 

National Arbitration and Peace Congress: Proceedings, 1909. 

National Irrigation Congress: Proceedings, 17-18th Congress. 

National League for the Civic Education of Women: Seawell, The 
Ladies' Battle; Barry, The Truth Concerning Four Women Suffrage 
States. 

University of Nebraska: Studies, Vol. 10, Nos. 1-4. 

University of Nevada: Studies, Vol. 3, No. 1. 

New England Society of the City of New York: 105th Anniversary 
Celebration, 1910. 

New Jersey, State Geologist: Annual Report, 1909. 

New Jersey, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Annual Report, 1910. 

New York, City Board of Education: Annual Report, 1909; Direc- 
tory of Teachers in Public Schools. 



40 

New York, State Education Department: Annual Report, 1910; 
Annual Report, 1910, Vol. 2, No. 474, Vol. 3, No. 478; Bulletin, Nos. 
483, 487. 

New York, State Historian: Minutes of the Executive Council of 
the Province of New York, Vols. 1-2. 

New York, State Hospital for the Care of Crippled and Deformed 
Children: Annual Report, No. 10. 

New York, State Commissioner of Labor: Annual Report, 1910. 

New York, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Annual Report, 1909, Vols. 
1-2. 

New York, State Department of Labor: State Labor Bulletin, Nos. 
45-47. 

New York University Library: Krause, Gerhart Hauptmann's 
Treatment of Blank Verse. 

North Carolina, University: Record, No. 86; Studies in Philology, 
Vols. 2, 6-8. 

North German Lloyd Steamship Co.: 6 Pamphlets; Bulletin, Vol. 
32, Nos. 1-2. 

Ohio, University: Legal History of the Ohio University. 

Oklahoma Geological Survey: Bulletin, Nos. 2-3, 5, 6, Pts. 1-2, 7; 
Circular, Nos. 2-3. 

State University of Oklahoma: Research Bulletin, No. 4. 

Paris, Faculte des Lettres: Bibliotheque; Vol. 27. 

Pennsylvania, Epileptic Hospital and Colony Farm: Fifteenth Annual 
Report, 1910. 

Pennsylvania Historical Society: Formal Opening of the New Fire- 
proof Building of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, April 6-7, 1910. 

Pennsylvania Prison Society: Philanthropy, January, 1902, 1909. 

Pennsylvania, State Library: Auditor General, Report, 1909; Factory 
Inspector, Annual Report, 1909; G. A. R. Encampment, Proceedings, 
Vol. 44; Board of Health, Report, 1908; Insurance Commissioner, Annual 
Report, 1909; Department of Mines, Report, 1909, Pt. 2; Board of Com- 
missioners of Public Charities, Annual Report, 1908; Department off 
Public Printing, Report, 1909; Railroad Commission, Annual Report, 
1909; Regimental Histories, Under the Maltese Cross — Campaigns of the 
155th Pennsylvania Regiment, History of the 101st Pennsylvania Regi- 
ment, History of the 103rd Pennsylvania Regiment; Commissioner of Sink- 
ing Fund, Report, 1909; State Highway Department, Report, 1908; State 
Library, Annual Report, 1908; Department of Internal Affairs, Report, 
1908-09; State Library, Statutes at Large, Vol. 4; Smull's Handbook, 
1910; Reports on the Resurvey of the Mason and Dixon Line, 4 Memorial 
Volumes. 

University of Pennsylvania: Giesecke, American Commercial Legis- 
lation Before 1789, The Museum Journal, Vol. 2, No. 1; Publications, 
Contributions from Botanical Laboratory, Vol. 4, No. 1; Publications, 
Series in Philology and Literature, Sembower, Life and Poetry of Chas. 
Cotton; Contributions from Zoological Laboratory, Vol. 16. 



41 

Peoples University: Rhead, Studio Pottery. 

Philadelphia, Parish Schools: Educational Briefs, No. 31. 

Pratt Institute Library: Technical Books of 1910. 

Princeton University Library: 5 Dissertations. 

Radcliffe College: Monographs, Buckingham, Division of Labor 
Among Ants. 

Sagamore Sociological Conference: Fourth Sagamore Sociological 
Conference, 1910. 

Seybert Institution for Poor Boys and Girls : Report, 1909-10. 

Standard Oil Co.: Oral Argument on Behalf of Appellants, 1910. 

Strassburg Universitat: 32 Dissertations. 

Testimony Publishing Co.: The Fundamentals, Vols. 3-5. 

University of Texas: Bulletin, Nos. 143, 145, 151-153, 164-167, 170. 

Thomas Brackett Reed Memorial Association: Thomas Brackett 
Reed. 

Ticonderoga Pulp and Paper Co. : A Memorial Tablet at Ticonderoga. 

United States Brewers' Association: Text Book of True Temperance, 
1911. 

University Club of New York: Annual, 1911-12. 

University of Washington: Bulletin, Inaugural Addresses, No. 2. 

Wellcome Chemical Research Laboratories: Papers, Nos. 108-125. 

Wisconsin, Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics: Biennial 
Report, Vol. 15. 

Wisconsin, Railroad Commission: Erickson, Regulation of Public 
Utilities; Roemer, Causes and Effects of a Public Utilities Commission. 

University of Wisconsin: Bulletin, General Series, Nos. 210, 270; 
Philology and Literature Series, Vol. 3, No. 4. 

World Peace Foundation: Sir Edward Grey on World Peace; Myers, 
List of Arbitration Treaties, Syndicates for War. 

Yale University Library: 22 Reprints; Woodbine, Four Thirteenth 
Century Law Tracts; WJieelock, On the Nature of the Ionization Product 
of A Rays. 

Periodicals, The Gift of Publishers. 

Advocate of Peace; California University Chronicle; City Club 
Bulletin; Columbia University Quarterly; Deaconess Advocate; Johns 
Hopkins University Circulars; Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific 
Society; Lantern; Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography; 
Southern Workman; Spirit of Missions; Technology Review; Tipyn o' 
Bob; Visiting Nurse Quarterly; Washington Chapel Chronicle; Woman's 
Missionary Friend. 



Report of the Director op 1 Athletics and Gymnastics. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to make the following report on the 
work of the department of gymnastics and athletics, and on 
such work of the Health Department as has been under my 
charge during the year 1910-11. 

Health and Physical Examinations. 

In October, 1910, 332 students were examined; of these 
12 were excused the full strength tests. In April, 1911, 328 
were re-examined; of these 20 were excused the full strength 
tests. These examinations gave the following averages: 



College Averages. 

r • u + Exp: 

leignt, chest. wtn iud. 

cm - cm. cm. kg 

62.63 5.62 5.94 311. 

Sem. II 57.59 162.80 5.94 6.28 330.73 187 



Che^^trkib. Strength, ^J^ 
cm. g ' cu. in. 

Sem. 1 57.17 162.63 5.62 5.94 311.62 185 



American average as stated by Dr. Dudley Sargent : 



Strength, cj^fty 
£• cu. in. 

235 132 



Class of 1911: 

Sem. 1 57.61 

Sem. II 56.87 

Class of 1912: 

Sem. 1 55.90 

Sem. II 56.28 

Class of 1913: 

Sem. 1 57.35 

Sem. II 58.61 

Class of 1914: 

Sem. 1 57.35 

Sem. II 58.60 



Class Averages. 








163.09 


5.88 


6.04 


323.86 


187 


162.98 


5.72 


6.18 


332.61 


186 


160.61 


5.27 


5.98 


317.09 


180 


160.72 


5.90 


6.16 


337.00 


182 


163.60 


5.66 


5.88 


306.32 


190 


163.97 


6.13 


6.56 


327.52 


194 


163.21 


5.68 


5.88 


299.22 


183 


163.52 


6.05 


6.19 


325.79 


186 



(42) 



43 



Strength Tests. 
Table showing numbers of students above and below the 
average in respect to strength tests at the first and second 
physical examinations, according to classes. 



Strength 
Test. 



October, 1910. 
1911 1912 



April, 1911. 



1913 1914 



1911 



1912 



1913 1914 



Above 400 kg. 4 


7 


2 


3 


10 


11 


7 


9 


375 ' 


4 


5 


4 


3 


7 


4 


6 


7 


350 ' 


13 


4 


9 


9 


5 


5 


8 


14 


325 ' 


8 


7 


12 


16 


6 
14 
10 


10 
17 
11 


18 
21 
10 


15 


Average 300 ' 


12 


10 


20 


15 


23 


275 ' 


10 


19 


17 


21 


22 


250 ' 


6 


9 


15 


29 


2 


3 


5 


10 


225 ' 


3 


4 


5 


11 


4 


4 


3 


2 


200 ' 


1 





2 


1 


1 





1 


1 



Lung Capacity. 
Table showing the numbers of students above and below 
the average in respect to lung capacity at the first and second 
physical examinations, according to classes. 







October, 1910. 






April, 


1911. 






Lung 
Capacity. 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


Above 


260 cu. in. 1 





2 





1 





2 


1 




240 " 


' 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 


3 







220 " 


' 4 





7 


7 


1 


4 


6 


7 




210 '• 


•' 3 


3 


7 


6 


7 


1 


7 


6 




200 " 


' 10 


7 


10 


13 


8 


8 


11 


11 




190 " 


' 10 


13 


10 


14 


7 

8 

10 


7 
14 
11 


14 
14 

7 


17 


Average 


; 180 " 


' 11 


9 


13 


18 


20 




170 " 


' 8 


6 


16 


18 


15 




160 " 


' 9 


10 


10 


18 


10 


6 


8 


14 




150 " 


' 3 


7 


4 


7 


1 


6 


4 


8 




140 " 


' 2 


5 


2 


5 


3 


4 


3 


3 


- 


130 " 


' 


1 


2 





2 








1 




120 " 


• 


1 





1 





1 










110 " 


' 














1 









The three highest and three lowest tests in strength and 
lung capacity were: 

Strength Tests. 

Highest, 



October, 1910. 



highest, 
kg. 


Class. 


Lowest, 
kg. 


Class. 


482.5 


1912 


223.5 


1914 


471.5 


1914 


218. 


1913 


438. 


1911 


209. 


1912 



April, 1911. 
Class. Lowest, 



557. 

506.5 

496.5 



1912 
1914 
1914 



224. 

210.5 

208.5 



Class. 

1911 
1914 
1913 



44 

Lung Capacity. 
Highest, Class Lowest, claas Highest, class Lowest, aaga 



, 1912 
274 1913 130 { and 

11913 
270 1914 128 1914 



1911 
280 1911 130 { and 

1914 
275 1913 129 1912 



269 1911 120 . 1912 270 1914 118 1912 

Defective Physical Conditions. 
Defective physical conditions noted during the October 
examinations and treated during the year by special exercises 
in addition to the required gymnastics : 

Condition. Number of Correc- Im- 

Cases. ted. proved. 

Scoliosis 112 28 15 

Lordosis 1 1 

Weak chest and lungs 12 . . 12 

Flat or pronated feet 25 18 7 

Cases treated by special exercises and massage by Miss 
Branson : 

o ,-,. Number of Correc- Im- 

Condition. Cases. ted. proved. 

Scoliosis 12 4 8 

Backache 5 3 

General debility 3 2 1 

Muscle laceration 2 2 

-rr • - _j- i treatment * 

Knee joint 1 changed 1 

Nervous prostration 1 . . 1 

Asymmetrical head and neck 1 . . 1 

Sacro-iliac joint, displacement 1 . . 1 

Defective physical and health conditions noted during the 
October examinations and under supervision or referred to 
physicians during the year: 

Condition. Number* 

General debility 28 

Nervousness 5 

Recovery from illnesses or operations 4 

Vaccination 4 

Anaemia 4 

Under home physicians 5 

Varicose veins 2 

Backache 3 

Enlarged thyroid 1 

Indigestion 3 

Constipation 6 

Erratic habits 6 



45 

Defective physical or health conditions noted during the 
year and referred to physicians or put under supervision: 

„ Number of 

Condition. Casea 

General debility 11 

Nervousness 1 

Recovery from illnesses or operations .' . 9 

Under home physicians 10 

Backache 2 

Indigestion 3 

The senior class is the first graduating class for whom 
health cards have been kept each year. These cards show the 
following health results: 

Class of 1911: 

Students leaving college with same health as entering. . . 38 

Students leaving college with health improved 20 

Students leaving college with health worse 3 

Medical Examinations. 
Three hundred and twenty-eight students were examined 
at the beginning of the year by the Visiting Physician of the 
College as to the condition of the heart and lungs, with the 
following; results : 



Normal 228 



No restrictions in athletics or 
gymnastics. 



Cardiac murmurs 19 

Slight cardiac irregularity ... 37 { Gymnastic and athletic work reg- 

General health only fair 43 ulated to suit condition. 

Bronchial trouble 1 J 

Oculist' s Examinations. 
One hundred and eighty-three undergraduates and seven 
graduates were examined by the Examining Oculist of the 
College, with the following results: 

Condition. NU G^!s.° f Treatment. 

Normal 34 

Glasses satisfactory 34 

Glasses needed readjusting. . 4 

Slight symptoms of eye-strain 19 
Further examination if symp- \ 16 re-examined and glasses pre- 

toms increased 31 / scribed or changed. 

Further examination and 

treatment necessary 68 J 



47 re-examined and treated. 



46 

Hygiene Lectures. 

Four lectures on practical, personal hygiene were given in 

November : 

I. Introductory, Digestive Organs, Circula- 
tion by C. M. K. Applebee. 

II. Lungs and Excretory Organs by C. M. K. Applebee. 

III. Muscular and Nervous System by C. M. K. Applebee. 

IV. The Racial Functions and Sex Hygiene ... by Dr. Lilian Welsh, of 

Goucher College, Baltimore, Md. 

These lectures were open to all students, attendance at the 
first three lectures was compulsory for freshmen, resident and 
non-resident. 

Gymnasium Report. 

Trial drills for freshmen and students not taking part in 
any athletics were held during November. The regular 
gymnastic season began November 28th and ended March 31st. 

Weekly classes were held as follows: 

rp Number of Number of 

lype - Classes. Students. 

Light gymnastics 6 267 

Apparatus work 6 249 

Special corrective work 3 14 

Fencing 3 33 

Classic dancing 4 111 

For graduate students only 1 21 

Students substituting corrective exercises or massage under 
Miss Branson, or entirely excused: 

r. Number of 

Cause - Students. 

Nervous prostration 1 

General debility 2 

Recovery from illnesses or operations 4 

During November and December the swimming pool was 
closed owing to the condition of the water, but was opened in 
January when swimming lessons began. 

Number of Students xr„mK ora Niimher 

authorized as expert *?£ £it Number still ^ing 

"irtcK" 2nTciass unable to sw,m. *££«_ 

203 73 50 35 

A gymnastic contest between the Sophomores and Fresh- 
men was held March 24th. 



47 



The championship shield was awarded to the Class of 1913. 



Events. 



Maximum 
Number 
of Points. 



Marching Tactics 30 

Indian Club Drill 30 

Wand Drill . 30 

Rope Climbing 45 

Parallel Bars 90 

Vaulting Horse 30 

Total 255 



Points, 
1913. 

24 
28 
28 
36 
67 
30 

213 



Points, 
1914. 

20 
23 
26 
40 
62 
23 

194 



The judges were Miss Adela Adams, Miss Stone, Dean 
Reilly. 

Three hundred and thirty-three students registered 
exercise; 155 students had no excuse from exercise, 178 had 
occasional excuses. 



Causes of Excuses 
from Exercise. 



Number of 
Students Excused. 



Causes of Excuses 
from Exercise. 



Number of 
Students Excused 



Abscesses 2 

Absent, at home 10 

Backache 3 

Biliousness 1 

Boils 3 

Breaking arches of feet 4 

Bronchitis 2 

Catarrh of stomach 1 

Chilblains 1 

Colds 29 

Diarrhoea 1 

Eyes, drops in 1 

Fatigue 16 

Fever 1 

Gastritis 1 

Glands, swollen 1 

Grip 23 

Headache 1 

Heart trouble 1 

Hemorrhoids 1 

Illness at home S 

Infected finger 1 

Jaundice 6 

Lumbago 1 

Lungs, weak 1 



Measles 6 

Mumps 1 

Nervous exhaustion 10 

Nervous indigestion 6 

Neuralgia 2 

Neuritis 5 

Operations — 

Appendicitis 3 

Nose and throat 1 

Tonsils and adenoids 4 

Pain in hip 1 

Paralysis, facial 1 

Pink eye 6 

Poisoning — 

Ivy 3 

Ptomaine 1 

Pyelitis 1 

Quarantine 4 

Recovery from — ■ 

Congestion of lungs 1 

Operations 1 

Typhoid 1 

Rheumatism 4 

Scarlet fever (3 in college, 1 at 

home) 4 



48 



Causes of Excuses 
from Exercise. 

Sore throat. . . . 

Tonsilitis 

Varicose veins . . 



Number of 
Students Excused. 



Causes of Excuses 
from Exercise. 



Number of 
Students Excused. 



Vaccine infection 4 

Wart on foot 4 

Weakness, general 1 



Table of Accidents, 
10 sprained ankles 



5 strained backs. 



6 injured knees. 



4 broken noses. 



1 severe burn, leg . . . 
1 front teeth broken. 
1 severe strain, neck. 

1 severe strain, wrist. 

2 bruised side 



1 water on toe . 



1910-11. 

Causes, 
basket ball, women's rules, 
basket ball, men's rules, 
fall down stairs, 
fall in room, 
riding, 
walking, 
fall from wall, 
diving. 

fall from horse, 
playing in gymnasium, 
at home. 

gymnasium class, 
playing in gymnasium. 
May Day. 
walking, 
basket ball, 
hockey, 
fall on chair, 
scalded in tea-pantry, 
fall on chair, 
running inside building, 
driving, 
tobogganing. 
Gymnasium, 
walking. 



Fines. 

Nine students failed to have their physical examinations 
within the required time. Twenty -five students failed to 
register the required number of gymnastic drills, fifteen failed 
to register the required number of periods of exercise. 

The fines imposed were as follows: 

Physical examinations $18.00 

Gymnastic drills 186.00 

Exercise 34.50 

Total $238.50 



49 

Athletics. 
Calendar of Athletics for the Year 1910-1911. 

October 6th First hockey practice. 

October 16th First Athletic Association meeting held. 

October 22d Hockey 'Varsity matches began. 

November 7th Class hockey matches began. 

January 14th •. . . .Swimming meet — Preliminaries. 

January 20th Swimming meet — Finals. 

February 13th Track practice began. 

March 3d Track meet — Preliminaries. 

March 6th Fencing tournament, 'Varsity vs. Alumnae. 

March 6th Inlaying plate in gymnasium to Class of 1912. 

March 10th Track meet— Finals. 

April 3d Basket-ball practice began. 

April 10th Water polo matches began. 

April 10th Inter-class tennis doubles. 

May 7th Basket-ball matches began. 

May 27th Tennis, 'Varsity vs. Merion Cricket Club. 

June 6th Tennis, 'Varsity vs. Alumnae. 

June 7th Basket-ball, 'Varsity vs. Alumnae. 

Athletic Statistics. 
Percentage of students taking part in athletics: 

B ^. et - Hockey, S«L d ^ater T ^ Tpack 

ball ' + per cent. Swimme + rs ' Pol< \ percent, percent, 
percent. ^ percent, percent. ' 

Class 1911 38 66 55 17 93 24 

1912 59 77 56 14 91 23 

1913 47 70 71 20 87 27 

1914 68 78 69 20 89 37 

College 53 73 63 18 90 28 

Percentage of students taking no part in athletics : 

Class 1911 3.5 

1912 3.3 

1913 2.5 

1914 1.0 

College 2.6 

Tennis. — The class championship was won by 1913. The 
college championship was won by 1913 also. The captains 
were: H. Henderson, 1911; E. Faries, 1912; A. Patterson, 
1913; E. Ayer, 1914. 



50 

Hockey. — The class championship was won by 1911. The 
captains were: H. Emerson, 1911; C. Chase, 1912; A. Hearne, 
1913; L. Cadbury, 1914. Each class had one first and one 
second team, with substitutes. From ninety-five to one 
.hundred students practiced daily during the season. 

Swimming. — The class championship was won by 1913. 
The captains were: D. Coffin, 1911; W. Scripture, 1912; Y. 
Stoddard, 1913; A. Miller, 1914. The events at the contest 
were as follows : 

68-foot swim on front 18-f seconds. 

68-foot swim on back 22 seconds. 

Plunge for distance 48 feet, 3|- inches. 

136-foot swim on front 41-f seconds. 

136-foot swim on back 534 seconds. 

Dive for form. 
Fancy dive. 
Class relay race. 

Two college records were broken : 

136-foot swim on front. 
Plunge for distance. 

Water Polo. — The class championship was won by 1914. 
The captains were: D. Coffin, 1911; W. Scripture, 1912; Y. 
Stoddard, 1913; A. Miller, 1914. Each class had one first 
team with substitutes. 

Track Athletics. — The class championship was won by 1911. 
The individual championship was won by H. Emerson, 1911. 
The captains were: A. Parker, 1911; F. Crenshaw, 1912; L. 
Haydock, 1913; E. Lee, 1914. The events at the contest were 
as follows: 

Hurdle race. 

Rope climb 12i seconds. 

Running vault 4 feet lOf inches. 

Running high jump 4 feet \ inch. 

Standing broad jump 6 feet 11 \ inches. 

Shot put 26 feet 10 inches. 

Three broad jumps 21 feet 4| inches. 

Tug of war. 

Standing hop, step, jump 21 feet. 

Class relay race. 



51 

One college record was broken: 
Running vault 4 feet 10;; inches. 

Thirty-four students entered the meet. 

Fencing. — The tournament — Varsity vs. Alumnae — was 
won by the Alumnae. 

Basket Ball. — The class championship was won by 1913. 
The captains were: L. Houghteling, 1911; A. Chambers, 1912; 
F. M. Dessau, 1913; E. Baker, 1914. Each class had one first 
and one second team with substitutes. From sixty to seventy 
students played daily during the season. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Constance M. K. Applebee, 
Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 



Report of the Physician in Chief of the College. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report of the 
cases I have attended at Bryn Mawr College from October 1, 
1910, to September 30, 1911. 

Two students became ill with typhoid fever in the begin- 
ning of the college year, having been infected before entering 
the college. They were transferred to the Bryn Mawr Hos- 
pital and made thorough recoveries, one being able to com- 
plete her college year. 

On March 15, it was deemed wise to close the college for 
a period of ten days, three cases of scarlet fever having appeared. 
A senior, a junior and a sophomore, having no work in common, 
developed symptoms of the disease within thirty-six hours of 
each other. The infection was presumably contracted in rail- 
road travel. 

Following the re-opening of the college, 3 cases of measles, 
3 cases of German measles, 2 cases of mumps, and 8 cases of 
infectious conjunctivitis developed in such rapid succession 
that the facilities for the care of the patients were entirely 
inadequate and pointed more clearly than ever before to the 
necessity of providing an infirmary with proper facilities and 
equipment. 

The surgical work has been minor and insignificant and no 
fatalities have resulted during the college year. 

/. Medical Cases. 

Anaemia 2 Chronic headache 2 

Appendicial colic 2 Exhaustion 2 

Bronchitis 17 Facial palsy 1 

Bilious attack 3 German measles 3 

Bronchiectasis with pleural effu- Gout 1 

sion 1 General colds 12 

Catarrhal jaundice 3 Influenza 22 

Conjunctivitis 2 Infectious conjunctivitis 8 

Coryza 2 Indigestion with rash 3 

Catarrhal bronchitis 3 Insomnia 2 

(52) 



Ivy poisoning 6 

Laryngitis 2 

Mumps 2 

Measles 3 

Neuralgia 1 

Neurasthenia from fatigue 6 

Neurasthenia with melancholia. 3 



Pyelitis... ,. 1 

Pleurisy 1 

Scarlet fever 3 

Typhoid fever 2 

Tonsilitis 11 

Total 132 



77. Surgical Cases. 



Burns of foot 1 

Boils on face 1 

Crush of finger, with stitches . . 1 

Curvature of spine 1 

Contusions of knee 2 

Contusions over left tibia 1 

Contusions, with slight symp- 
toms of concussion ] 

Detachment of rib 1 

Dislocation o